Friday, August 30, 2013

Wasps bothering you?

Are you being bothered by Wasps?

I was in to the greenhouse the other day when I spotted a few things that we carry to rid your outdoor patio area and yard of wasps. The wasps are starting to appear already and never at an opportune moment. Just when we’re about to sit down for a nice meal on the patio or enjoy a drink outside, there they are. Many people are allergic to yellowjacket stings so must always be on guard.
Jensen’s carries Doktor Doom that will kill wasps, mosquitoes, house flies and many other insects as well as ants and bed bugs! I understand it has also proven effective on the dreaded Lily Beetle.
We carry yellowjacket traps that are non-toxic. They come complete with an attractant. You just add water and hang. There are no killing agents, the insects die naturally. The traps catch ten yellowjacket species, but will not trap beneficial honeybees.
We also carry the Waspinator, a durable, weatherproof device that resembles a wasp nest. It acts like a scarecrow for wasps – other wasps see it as an enemy nest and avoid the area. It can be left out year-round in any weather. No harmful chemicals, no dead wasps to clean up, no maintenance, and no more wasps!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 2:20 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Arlene's Late Summer Gardening Tips

1. Thinking of over-wintering some of your plants? Start taking your plants in before the nights start dropping to below 10 degrees. Water them well and spray with an insecticidal soap or product to rid the plants of any insects and disease. Isolate the plants for a couple of weeks before introducing them to the house and near houseplants.
2. Collecting seeds or cuttings? Let the seeds mature, turn brown and dry on the plant. If you collect them too early, they will not germinate. Seeds such as tomatoes should be collected, fermented for about a week in a jar filled with a little bit of water and then dried and stored. Collect cuttings now while the plant is still strong and healthy and before the temperature at night starts falling.
3. High humidity causing mildew and fungus? Mix 1 – 2 T. of baking soda into 1 litre of water. Shake well and spray on plants that are susceptible or are suffering. Spray weekly. If your plant has become entirely covered with mildew, you may need something stronger. Drop into Jensens to pick up a cure. Sulphur Dust is a great product to use if a number of your plants have been suffering. Fungus is a cause of not enough air circulation and high humidity. You may want to give the infected plants a bit of fertilizer to help it through its stress.
4. Are you still fertilizing? Continue fertilizing all of your annuals, but, now is the time to stop fertilizing your trees, shrubs and perennials, unless they are suffering. Let them start preparing for winter rather than start producing more tender foliage that may be susceptible to damage from an early frost. Roses have to prepare for winter. Stop fertilizing and deadheading as you want them to start forming rose-hips. Fertilizer stakes for your trees, fruit trees and shrubs are great to put down just before the ground starts freezing so they will get a boost with the warmer temperatures of spring.
5. Harvesting herbs? Gather herbs early in the morning when the aromatic oils are the strongest. Hang them upside down in a clean brown paper bag to dry. The bags keep out the light and catch any seeds or leaves that may fall off the stems. Cut a few holes in each bag to increase air circulation. To keep spices and herbs longer, store them in the freezer rather than the cupboard.
6. Growing tomatoes? Now is the time to cut the tops off your tomato plants so the strength will go into the fruit. To peel fresh tomatoes, plunge them briefly into boiling water, then into cold water. The skins will crack and slip off. You can peel peaches and plums the same way.
7. Bumper crop of Tomatoes? Freeze whole tomatoes on baking sheets and then store them in plastic bags until ready to use. Use them in soups, stews, casseroles or chili.
OR
Think of our friends at Winnipeg Harvest and bring them some of your excess tomatoes and vegetables!!!

Arlene Ortiz (Wheeler)


Posted by Tammy Jensen at 3:42 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, August 08, 2013

Is that it for summer?

Where did our summer go??? I hope it’s going to be coming out of hiding soon! I was sitting out on the balcony the other day thinking “what a great day for planting”. It’s a fine time to be planting trees, shrubs and perennials to be enjoyed next season. This is also the time of year to be thinking about what you would like to change in your yard or garden for next year. Maybe you already know of a few holes you would like to fill, or maybe you would like to extend a bed or create a new one. This is a great time to get those trees, shrubs or perennials planted and settled in nicely before frost. Check out our web-site for some wonderful information on trees, shrubs and perennials. If you haven’t had time to take a step back and make some notes on what you would like to change or keep in your garden or containers for next year, now is the time to do it while you can sit and look at it. Maybe that tree you planted in the back yard a few short years ago has grown more than you thought. All of a sudden, the sunny spot where you have had your roses or have always planted your sun-loving annuals is getting more shade than sun. Now is a great time to sit back and think about what you would like to enjoy in that spot instead. If you decide on what you would like to see in that spot, take advantage of our weather and the great prices at Jensen’s and get it done now! If you would rather Jensen’s planted for you, just give us a call. I took time a few days ago to sit down and make some notes. This spring in my containers I had planted an Intrigue Canna, mouth-watering salmon coloured begonias, coleus and Lismachia and I have decided that for next year, the begonias have got to go. I thought I would try the begonias (I couldn’t resist the colour), even though my balcony is hot and south facing, as I get a fair bit of shade from the balcony above; but, I found that I had to move my containers way too much to give my begonias enough shade and to keep my plants from leaning toward the light. I will be planting the canna again as I just love the colour of the leaves and I will also be planting a lot more Lismachia. I love the beautiful green colour and the way it flows gracefully over the edges and down the container. Now, I just have to decide on a flower to replace the begonia that will take full sun and a lot of wind. And, oh yes, more heliotrope for sure in my other container! I’m really enjoying the sweet smell of my heliotrope when I sit out on my balcony, especially in the evening. If you plant a vegetable garden, remember to rotate your crops. If you plant the same vegetable in the same spot every year, unless you really add a lot of compost or rejuvenate the soil, that vegetable will become poorer and poorer. It will be taking the same minerals out of the soil each year. Make a list of the vegetables you are wanting to plant. Take advantage of companion planting to make your life easier. Some plants will deter pests, while others may inhibit or support the growth of flowers or vegetables. Also, make the most of your garden by planting early maturing vegetables with slower growing, later maturing ones. This is one of the most enjoyable parts of gardening – planning for next year!!! It’s so much fun to plan and strive for perfection. So, don’t be kicking yourself in the middle of winter as you’re starting to think about what you’re going to be planting or changing in the garden. Make some notes now while your mind is fresh and while your garden is mature and in full bloom. Can you really rely on your memory??? Arlene
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 4:42 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Arlene’s Collection of Tips and Tricks - Part 3

1. To keep dried spices and herbs longer, store them in the freezer rather than in the cupboard. 2. If you have run out of rooting hormone while planting slips of plants, use cinnamon. 3. Have you ever tried freezing tomatoes? It’s an especially good trick in the middle of hot August when you’re inundated with a bumper crop. Freeze your whole tomatoes on baking sheets and then store them in plastic bags in the freezer. The skins will conveniently crack during freezing, making it easy to remove them once the tomatoes have thawed. 4. Boil cinnamon and cloves in water on the back of the stove to eliminate cooking odours and to freshen the air. 5. Keep charcoal briquettes in the refrigerator to sweeten the air. To refresh them, just heat the briquettes gently in a heavy pot, you’ll find that the odours they have absorbed will vanish into thin air. 6. Safe Pest Treatments for Houseplants – Spot treatment with alcohol will eliminate mealy bugs on houseplants. To control whiteflies, aphids and spider mite, add 1 Tablespoon of dish detergent to 1 cup of vegetable oil. Take no more than 1 – 2 tsp. of this solution and add it to 1 cup of water in a spray container. Shake well and spray on both sides of the plant’s leaves. 7. Here’s an efficient watering device for any garden plant. Take a plastic gallon jug and remove the cap, cut out the bottom, turn it upside down, and force the neck of the jug into the ground close to the plant. Then, fill the jug with water. It’s a good way to fertilize as well. 8. Cut the bottom of 2 litre plastic bottles and use over delicate plants as protection when planting your garden. 9. Pinch out new growth on plants to encourage bushiness. 10. Snails: Method 1 – Ammonia Spray: 1 part ammonia to 10 parts water, spray on slugs early in the morning. It does not hurt the plant; however, you should be careful not to spray everywhere as it will kill good bugs as well. 11. Snails: Method 2 – Barrier Method: Around the base of the plants under attack, right around the stem where it goes into the ground, sprinkle baby powder or talc which sticks to their gummy bodies so they will not go through it or, if they do, it will kill them eventually. An inch of sand, the coarser the better, like a moat around the plant, makes it unpleasant to impassable for most slugs. Copper bands cause a shock to the slugs. This can be bought in a tape form at many garden centres. 12. Snails: Method 3 – Boiling Water: In the very early spring, pour boiling water along any hard edge that is in contact with the soil of a flower bed. This would be like a sidewalk, fence or edging material including large stones or rocks in your garden. This will kill the eggs. Now, this can be challenging if like in most gardens you have huge spaces that fit this definition. Do it in areas where there is a lot of moisture or shade where you are having a serious snail colony problem. 13. Drainage for containers: Especially for large pots where you also want to reduce weight or if you move them around, use/recycle small plastic bottles or containers like pill bottles, empty hair spray or hand lotion bottles. Put a layer of those on the bottom and then add a layer of newspaper or landscape fabric before filling with earth and plants. You will only need about 8 – 12 inches for growing most annuals. 14. Caging sloppy plants: Cut tomato cages in half lengthwise, open them up and tuck under plants to hold them up. I often would cut the bottom section off and use for smaller plants. This is a great solution to keep your plants looking neat and upright. Arlene Ortiz (Wheeler)
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 4:19 PM 0 Comments