Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Step into our Paradise!

 Don’t get fooled by Mother nature, be cautious of planting annuals now and til the beginning of June & don’t worry about those perennials being slow -  gardening requires patience, …   but do get busy with your Garden’s clean-up to do list, turning and raking the soil, mixing in some good soil nutrients and mulch / compost.
 
STEP INSIDE our green house and you will be inspired by the display of flower colours & leaf textures. You will find your ole favourites & some new lovely annuals.   Get inspired to create your own containers by seeing what the greenhouse elves have been up to;  you can bring in your pots and plant them up in side our greenhouse or leave your pots with us and request a custom planting.  Our tabletops are full with hundreds of plants  and the walkways are lined with hanging pots and ground containers readily filled and waiting for your deck.    
 
 greenhouse, flowers, annuals, tropicals, succulents, hanging baskets
 
TRENDING …..   “Tropical plants & Grasses”;  for that a dramatic look (Thriller):   they can provide an immediate lush green to any entrance way & will thrive outdoors in our summers.  The tropical plants  can be brought into your house in fall but first must be sprayed for bugs.    
 
Eg:  Big elephant ears,  ivies, ferns, palm tree, succulents & catus, hibiscus, numerous grasses, cannas, climbing vines …..
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:59 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, January 17, 2013

Starting Seeds Indoors


Seeding both indoors and out can be challenging at the best of times, but, with a few tricks and tips, you can be most successful!

If you are starting some of your vegetable or flower seeds indoors, it is not necessary to have an expensive “Grow Light” set-up.  An ordinary cool white Fluorescent light bulb will do (or a sunny spot in the house}.  The secret is to keep your seeds and seedlings as close to the light as possible.  This will give you a firm and stocky seedling rather than a spindly one that looks like it has been stretched and is reaching for the light.  If you are using Fluorescent bulbs, give them about 15 hours a day under the bulbs.  A sunny window will also work well, but, be careful not to let the seeds dry out. Keeping your seeds too moist or too dry will deter germination.  Drop into the garden centre for a “soil-less” mix growing medium that mainly consists of peat moss, vermiculite and perlite.  It is light, fluffy and easy to work with.  It also helps the seedlings form an excellent root system for transplanting.  The first thing to do is pre-moisten the mix with hot water and then fill your container with soil.  I often use a plastic muffin container or strawberry container.  They have a lid attached so it creates a little greenhouse – perfect for germinating seeds. There are many different containers you can use for planting seeds.  An ordinary margarine or other container will do, just cover the top with a saran wrap after planting or put into a light see through plastic bag like you would put fruit and vegetables in when you buy from a food store, to create the same “greenhouse” effect.  Other seeds don’t like to be transplanted so sow them directly into little peat pots so they can be planted directly into the soil.  Some seeds are like dust (like Begonia seed), so just tap them onto the soil from your hand.  Gently firm the soil and then cover.  I remember a number of years ago planting Lisianthus seed for the first time with a friend.  We got the giggles and at the end of the planting, we weren’t sure if we had scattered the seed in the container or on the floor!
You can also save toilet paper rolls and by making about 3 or 4 one inch slits from the bottom, you can turn them into little containers for planting out.  They will break down in the moist soil, just as the peat pots do, and will allow the roots to grow through without problem. Some plants such as cucumber, celosia and sweet peas don’t like to be transplanted so sow them directly into the peat pots.  Other plants such as alyssum and lobelia can be grown in rows without being transplanted to larger containers. Simply pull them apart in little bunches and plant them outside in the soil or into containers when you are ready to plant.
Mix a product called “No-Damp in a spray bottle and spray on top of the seeded containers.  It is an anti-fungus and will prevent your seedlings from falling over after they have germinated. Some seeds germinate best in light and others best in darkness. If your seeds prefer darkness, cover the container loosely with tin foil or even some newspaper to keep the light out.  Other seeds germinate best when merely pressed into the top of the soil so they are exposed to light. Make note of this when you are reading about different plant varieties.
Some seeds will germinate better and faster with a little bottom heat. A few warm spots in the house would be in an oven with the light on; on top of a Fluorescent fixture on a light stand or beside a heat register.
Once you have had some success in germinating seeds indoors, you will wonder why you haven’t tried it before.
If you have some seeds that have been collecting dust around your house for years and you are wondering if they are still viable, place your seeds into a jar and half-fill the jar with warm water.  The seeds that float to the top are not good.  Another way to test seed is to take some of the seeds and put into a wet paper towel and put into a sealed plastic bag.  If they are good for planting, they will be sprouting in no time!
Most vegetables, except for the root crops (beets, carrots potatoes and parsnips), can be started inside for earlier crops.  Vegetables such as peppers, tomatoes, squash, cucumbers, pumpkins, melons, leeks and Spanish onions should be started indoors early to insure you will have crops later.  Corn needs heat to germinate so if you start seeds indoors in small peat pots a few weeks before planting outdoors, you will get a great jump on an early crop. You will also have much earlier Lettuce if you start seeds indoors and just a tip – Lettuce likes it cool so plant the seedlings outside early.  They can endure a lot of cold!
Drop into our Garden Centre and pick up a few packages of seeds to try!  Growing seeds indoors is a lot of fun!

Stay tuned next time to find out what to do once your seedlings
 Arlene Wheeler
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments