Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Long Weekend Flowers

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 Well, ..we are well under way both inside the greenhouse & outside @ Jensen’s Nursery, you can feel the excitement as many gardeners awaited their initial planting this May long weekend. Remember though it is early to plant annuals and most vegetables outside. There is still a chance of frost. Cold hardy onions, potatoes, and garlic bulbs could go in now for sure. If you a way to cover in case of frost or move containers into garages. Then plant away but watch the weather!
 
Our greenhouse is dazzling with many of our hanging baskets spilling over with colour and gardeners both new and old have been filling their shopping boxes with favourite plants.  A simple rule for planting pots is to have 3 different types of plants; the thriller being the focal or tallest plant in the container, the fillers should be of complimentary colours and shorter than the thriller, and last but not least, the spiller to add the dramatic draping of colour to your container.
 
The outside area has display tables of rows of perennials that will continue to change as they grow til  blooming and many display areas of shrubs and trees that are just now waking up as they fully leaf out.
 
Whether you have a shade spot or a sunny spot we have some great suggestions to help build your containers, gardens and landscaping.
Gardening can be a very rewarding activity. With a little time and effort, you can watch your creativity blossom and your ideal outdoor space flower.
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greenhouse, flowers, hanging baskets, coleus, basket stuffers, winnipegs best greenhouse
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:59 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, December 02, 2015

3 Weeks of Christmas!

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I love Christmas! We are very busy and there is lots to do. And we have Cookies! north pole, christmas shop, christmas tree shop, swags, wreaths, fresh greens, jensen nursery
It was nice to see some of our “regular” customers and great to see some newcustomers this past weekend.  
 
We have delivered quite a few Christmas trees already, so I thought it was time to give you some specific care instructions to keep your tree beautiful throughout the season.
 
If we have done a fresh cut at the bottom of your tree, it is important to get that tree into water within an hour. If we have just dropped your tree off at our house, you will need to get a saw and take an inch off the bottom of your tree. This allows the tree to draw up water from the stand, just like a fresh bouquet of flowers. In the first days, your tree will drink a lot of water, so you have to check a couple of times a day to replenish the water in the stand. This water intake will slow down so that you will only have to add water every day or two. Please think about closing hot air vents that are near the tree. This will help. We don’t recommend anything but plain water. No sugar, 7 up etc. The most important idea here is that you don’t let that fresh cut be above the water line. 
 
If you haven’t received your tree yet, this might be a good time to consider a new stand. We have some in the greenhouse, that are extremely easy to use and hold a lot of WATER!!!
 
We have another open house this weekend, so stop by and grab a Poinsettia, or a cup of Glog!!! And I am making some more Fresh wreaths.
 
 
Joyeux Noel,
Jenniferchristmas trees, free christmas tree delivery,  christmas trees, winnipeg
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:18 PM 0 Comments

Monday, September 15, 2014

FREE Seminars and Fall Planting Class!

FALL PLANTING CLASS - Wed Sept 17th 6:00 pm
We still have openings at our Fall Container Planting Class this Wednesday! Bring your own pot and you can make up a beautiful container for approx $20! 1 Fall Mum, 1 Fountain Grass and 2 trailing sedum all planted in your own pot would only be $21 plus tax! We also have some great planters on sale for 40% off the day of the class!
Call (204)488-5042 or email tammy@jensennursery.com to register.

FREE FALL SEMINARS - Sat Sept 20th 9:00-4:00
We still have some spots for the free seminars on Saturday September 20th! They start at 9:15 and end around 4. Free lunch is included. You can register for the day or just for individual seminars. I did send out a detail list of seminars last week. If you missed this email let me know and I can resend it to you.
Email tammy@jensennursery.com to register
fall mums, winnipeg garden centers, fall planting classes using fall mums, jensen nursery and garden center
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 3:16 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Oh No My Evergreens look brown!

 As the snow recedes and we are spending more and more time outside we are starting to see what the winter has done to our yards.  One of the first signs of how tough the winter has been is the color of our evergreens.  A lot of the cedars, spruce and pines around the city are a lovely shade of brown.  Most people’s first reaction is that the plant is dead.  This is most likely not the case.  The buds for this years growth will still be alive, they are just waiting for some heat to start growing.  Once the new growth flushes out it will cover up the brown needles .  To help the process along you need to start fertilizing and watering your evergreens as soon as the snow is gone.   A fertilizer that is high in Nitrogen ( the first number on the formula) is the best.  Miracle Gro  water soluble Evergreen and Acid Loving Plant Food is an excellent source of nitrogen with a formula of 28-10-10.  In a typical watering can ( 2 gallon) you add 2 tablespoons of fertilizer.  Soak the soil that is around the plant to feed the roots.  For best results apply the fertilizer every two weeks throughout May and June.  As for watering, a deep watering every week unless it rains.

 

Susan Jensen Stubbe

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:02 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Spring Fling Seminars

 Well..I think Spring has decided to show it's face finally! This Saturday April 12th we are having our annual Spring Fling Free Seminar Day! We have filled up most of the seats already! There might be a seat or two left! Feel free to drop in for any seminar...just please bring a lawn chair along! We also will be having a 35% off sale on all gnomes and dwarfs for the day! Praire Garden books will also be on special! We actually now have almost a complete collection, some as far back as the late 70's! They will be on sale for $3-$13 depending on the year! So stock up on a Gardening book written by Prairie Authors about gardening on the Prairies!
Everything else in our store and greenhouse will be on sale at 15% OFF for one day only! Any plants purchased MUST be taken home with you!
Here is the list of seminars we are offering!!!

9:15: Jan Pederson from Bylands Nursery – What’s New for 2014!

 Jan will talk about new trees, shrubs, perennials, and edibles for landscaping in Winnipeg. He will also talk about some not new, but very interesting varieties. To be followed by a question/answer session with Jan!

10:15: Grant Dunn – Eddi’s Wholesale products – Spring Lawn & Plant Care

After a long cold winter your yard will need a bit of help. Grant will talk about all the products you can use to help your lawn and yard.

11:15: Arlene Ortiz (Wheeler) and Susan Jensen Stubbe - Got Questions?

A great chance to get the answers to all your gardening questions. Bring a notepad with all your questions! This will be a casual, fun and informative session.

12:15: FREE LUNCH!!!

 1:30: Michael Allen, M.Sc.F, R.P.F. – All About Bugs!
Consulting Urban Forester, Tree Diagnostician and I.S.A. Certified Arborist - Viburnum Tree Experts

Michael is going to talk about what to do about all those creepy crawly bugs that affect our trees, shrubs and lawns.

2:30 Jennifer Fletcher and Arlene Ortiz – All about Hydrangeas!

Join us to learn about the three types of hydrangeas and how you can better care for them.  Find out what new types are coming in and why you will want to include them in your garden.  
gnomes, plants, fairy garden plants, gnomes on sale, giftware and plants on sale, garden centres in Winnipeg, Jensen Nursery and Garden center


Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:16 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, August 08, 2013

Is that it for summer?

Where did our summer go??? I hope it’s going to be coming out of hiding soon! I was sitting out on the balcony the other day thinking “what a great day for planting”. It’s a fine time to be planting trees, shrubs and perennials to be enjoyed next season. This is also the time of year to be thinking about what you would like to change in your yard or garden for next year. Maybe you already know of a few holes you would like to fill, or maybe you would like to extend a bed or create a new one. This is a great time to get those trees, shrubs or perennials planted and settled in nicely before frost. Check out our web-site for some wonderful information on trees, shrubs and perennials. If you haven’t had time to take a step back and make some notes on what you would like to change or keep in your garden or containers for next year, now is the time to do it while you can sit and look at it. Maybe that tree you planted in the back yard a few short years ago has grown more than you thought. All of a sudden, the sunny spot where you have had your roses or have always planted your sun-loving annuals is getting more shade than sun. Now is a great time to sit back and think about what you would like to enjoy in that spot instead. If you decide on what you would like to see in that spot, take advantage of our weather and the great prices at Jensen’s and get it done now! If you would rather Jensen’s planted for you, just give us a call. I took time a few days ago to sit down and make some notes. This spring in my containers I had planted an Intrigue Canna, mouth-watering salmon coloured begonias, coleus and Lismachia and I have decided that for next year, the begonias have got to go. I thought I would try the begonias (I couldn’t resist the colour), even though my balcony is hot and south facing, as I get a fair bit of shade from the balcony above; but, I found that I had to move my containers way too much to give my begonias enough shade and to keep my plants from leaning toward the light. I will be planting the canna again as I just love the colour of the leaves and I will also be planting a lot more Lismachia. I love the beautiful green colour and the way it flows gracefully over the edges and down the container. Now, I just have to decide on a flower to replace the begonia that will take full sun and a lot of wind. And, oh yes, more heliotrope for sure in my other container! I’m really enjoying the sweet smell of my heliotrope when I sit out on my balcony, especially in the evening. If you plant a vegetable garden, remember to rotate your crops. If you plant the same vegetable in the same spot every year, unless you really add a lot of compost or rejuvenate the soil, that vegetable will become poorer and poorer. It will be taking the same minerals out of the soil each year. Make a list of the vegetables you are wanting to plant. Take advantage of companion planting to make your life easier. Some plants will deter pests, while others may inhibit or support the growth of flowers or vegetables. Also, make the most of your garden by planting early maturing vegetables with slower growing, later maturing ones. This is one of the most enjoyable parts of gardening – planning for next year!!! It’s so much fun to plan and strive for perfection. So, don’t be kicking yourself in the middle of winter as you’re starting to think about what you’re going to be planting or changing in the garden. Make some notes now while your mind is fresh and while your garden is mature and in full bloom. Can you really rely on your memory??? Arlene
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 4:42 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Arlene’s Collection of Tips and Tricks - Part 3

1. To keep dried spices and herbs longer, store them in the freezer rather than in the cupboard. 2. If you have run out of rooting hormone while planting slips of plants, use cinnamon. 3. Have you ever tried freezing tomatoes? It’s an especially good trick in the middle of hot August when you’re inundated with a bumper crop. Freeze your whole tomatoes on baking sheets and then store them in plastic bags in the freezer. The skins will conveniently crack during freezing, making it easy to remove them once the tomatoes have thawed. 4. Boil cinnamon and cloves in water on the back of the stove to eliminate cooking odours and to freshen the air. 5. Keep charcoal briquettes in the refrigerator to sweeten the air. To refresh them, just heat the briquettes gently in a heavy pot, you’ll find that the odours they have absorbed will vanish into thin air. 6. Safe Pest Treatments for Houseplants – Spot treatment with alcohol will eliminate mealy bugs on houseplants. To control whiteflies, aphids and spider mite, add 1 Tablespoon of dish detergent to 1 cup of vegetable oil. Take no more than 1 – 2 tsp. of this solution and add it to 1 cup of water in a spray container. Shake well and spray on both sides of the plant’s leaves. 7. Here’s an efficient watering device for any garden plant. Take a plastic gallon jug and remove the cap, cut out the bottom, turn it upside down, and force the neck of the jug into the ground close to the plant. Then, fill the jug with water. It’s a good way to fertilize as well. 8. Cut the bottom of 2 litre plastic bottles and use over delicate plants as protection when planting your garden. 9. Pinch out new growth on plants to encourage bushiness. 10. Snails: Method 1 – Ammonia Spray: 1 part ammonia to 10 parts water, spray on slugs early in the morning. It does not hurt the plant; however, you should be careful not to spray everywhere as it will kill good bugs as well. 11. Snails: Method 2 – Barrier Method: Around the base of the plants under attack, right around the stem where it goes into the ground, sprinkle baby powder or talc which sticks to their gummy bodies so they will not go through it or, if they do, it will kill them eventually. An inch of sand, the coarser the better, like a moat around the plant, makes it unpleasant to impassable for most slugs. Copper bands cause a shock to the slugs. This can be bought in a tape form at many garden centres. 12. Snails: Method 3 – Boiling Water: In the very early spring, pour boiling water along any hard edge that is in contact with the soil of a flower bed. This would be like a sidewalk, fence or edging material including large stones or rocks in your garden. This will kill the eggs. Now, this can be challenging if like in most gardens you have huge spaces that fit this definition. Do it in areas where there is a lot of moisture or shade where you are having a serious snail colony problem. 13. Drainage for containers: Especially for large pots where you also want to reduce weight or if you move them around, use/recycle small plastic bottles or containers like pill bottles, empty hair spray or hand lotion bottles. Put a layer of those on the bottom and then add a layer of newspaper or landscape fabric before filling with earth and plants. You will only need about 8 – 12 inches for growing most annuals. 14. Caging sloppy plants: Cut tomato cages in half lengthwise, open them up and tuck under plants to hold them up. I often would cut the bottom section off and use for smaller plants. This is a great solution to keep your plants looking neat and upright. Arlene Ortiz (Wheeler)
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 4:19 PM 0 Comments

Saturday, July 27, 2013

Arlene’s Collection of Gardening Tips & Tricks - Part 2

1. For a healthier lawn, forget the crew cut! A trim is all it needs. Lawns that are cut too short are more susceptible to drought and disease. For a vigorous lawn that chokes out weeds, keep your grass about 2 -3 inches long and never mow off more than 1/3 of the height of the grass blade at one time. 2. Easy and quick to make – Safe-to-use Insect Spray. In a blender, mix 1 garlic bulb, 1 small onion, 1 Tablespoon of cayenne pepper and 1 litre of water. Let this mixture steep for about an hour. Then, stir in 1 tsp. of liquid, non-detergent soap. Spray on your plants. Use immediately or store in a tightly covered container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. 3. For the crunchiest cucumbers, soil calcium is essential. Expert cuke growers often side-dress their crops with a calcium source, such as bone meal, gypsum, rock phosphate or dolomite lime. Pick your cucumbers young, mature fruit isn’t crunchy. 4. Be sure your cucumbers get enough moisture. Drought can cause hollow fruit, unsuitable for pickling. 5. Rose growers successfully combat powdery mildew and other fungal diseases by spraying roses with a solution of 3 Tablespoons of baking soda in a gallon of water. 6. A Quick Fix for Acid Soil – Wood ashes take just a few weeks to neutralize soil acidity (limestone takes about 6 months to a year). For best results, thoroughly mix the ashes into the soil in the fall time, and then repeat the application every 3 – 4 years, if soil tests indicate a need. As a rule of thumb, use 1 ¼ pounds of ashes for each pound of limestone recommended. 7. Don’t water your lawn late in the evening. The grass will remain wet through the night, encouraging mold and fungus growth. The best time to water your lawn is in the morning or right after the sun goes down, so the water has a chance to reach the roots instead of evaporating. 8. Try planting pole beans between corn hills or rows. The beans will climb the corn and save you the bother of setting poles. 9. There’s a trick to getting more variety out of a small garden plot. Interplant (plant more than one variety within a block of space). Good combinations are fast-maturing varieties with slow-maturing ones. Harvest the quick-to-mature varieties before the other need to fill the space. Try planting: (a) lettuce with corn, peas, radishes, or tomatoes (b) beans with carrots, corn, cucumbers, onions or squash (c) radishes with carrots, melons, onions or peas 10. When drying herbs, hang them upside down in clean brown paper bags. The bags keep out light and catch any seeds or leaves that may fall off the stems. Cut a few holes in each bag to increase air circulation. 11. To speed the ripening of mature green tomatoes, store them with apples in a confined space. Tomatoes release ethylene gas as they ripen and so do apples. The extra “charge” from the apples will speed the tomatoes along. 12. The best time to gather herbs is in the morning as that is when the aromatic oils are the strongest.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 3:17 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Arlene's Collection of Gardening Tips & Tricks - Part 1

I was perusing my pile of gardening articles and information when I came across my collection of tips that I have collected over the years and I would like to share them with you. Enjoy! 1. To get rid of Aphids, mix 1 Tbsp liquid soap and 1 cup of vegetable oil together. Add 2 tsp. of the blend to 1 gallon of water. Spray the plants with the mixture and follow with a spray of water. Wait about 15 minutes and then repeat. Don’t use this on squash, cauliflower or cabbage as they can suffer leaf burn. 2. To test if seeds are viable, put them in a container of water. If they float to the top, they are not good. 3. Prolong the life of cut flowers by putting a couple of drops of bleach in the water. The stems in the vase will stay bacteria free. 4. Kill weeds and grass growing in sidewalk cracks by dousing them with undiluted bleach. 5. Plant mint between cabbages to discourage caterpillars and other pests. 6. Plant green beans next to eggplant and potatoes. The beans deter an eggplant and potato nemesis, the Colorado Potato Beetle. 7. Natural sweetening for Tomato Sauce: If the tomato sauce you’re making isn’t sweet enough, instead of adding sugar, grate in some carrots, they work wonders! 8. Keeping lettuce longer: Moisten a clean kitchen towel; then wrap it around a head of lettuce. Place the wrapped head in an open plastic bag and store it in the refrigerator. It will keep well for up to 2 weeks. (Don’t seal the bag, allow the air to circulate.) 9. To peel fresh tomatoes, plunge them briefly into boiling water, then into cold water. The skins will crack and slip off. You can peel peaches, plums and beets the same way. 10. Storing potatoes: Don’t store potatoes near apples as apples give off ethylene gas, which causes potatoes to sprout. 11. Allow water to come to room temperature before using it on seedlings you start indoors as cold water chills the seedling roots, significantly slowing growth. 12. If you have trouble getting your beet seeds to germinate, try spreading the seeds on a piece of wax paper and then, using a rolling pin, crush the outside husks. This gives the seeds a head start. 13. For weeds growing in the cracks of a sidewalk or patio, mix ¼ cup of salt, 1 litre of vinegar and 2 tsp. of dish soap. Spray on the weeds when they are actively growing. 14. To keep cats and dogs off your lawn, put 2 – 3 cloves of garlic and 3 -4 hot red peppers into a blender to grind them up. Then combine this mixture with about a gallon of water and a few drops of dishwashing soap. Mix well. Sprinkle this solution around the edges of your yard and garden and along sidewalks. Repeat often. Stay tuned for more! Arlene Ortiz (Wheeler)
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Arlene's Dill Pickle Recipe

Arlene’s Dill Pickle Recipe – Makes about 7 – 1 litre jars 18 cups of water (spring water works best, if possible) 1 cup of white vinegar 1 cup of coarse pickling salt ½ cup of white sugar cloves of garlic bay leaves fresh dill seed pickling cucumbers Wash cucumbers and prick them a couple of times with a fork to prevent them from exploding. Bring water, vinegar, salt & sugar to a boil to make the brine. Pack jars with cucumbers, 1 clove of garlic, 1 bay leaf and a sprig of dill. Fill brine to the top of the jar. Seal. Store for 2 weeks before use. I found using spring water makes them last longer and they’re clearer and crisper. Store in a cool spot.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Friday, July 19, 2013

Are you that Gardener That Used to be on Breakfast TV?

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Are You the Gardener That Used to be on Breakfast TV Last Year? I was on my balcony a few days ago enjoying the sweet perfume of my Heliotrope and reading a book when I heard someone calling “Are you the gardener that used to be on Breakfast Television last year”? “I wonder if you can help me”. One of my neighbours on a balcony above was trying to get my attention. She was having some problems with her tomatoes. She showed me one of the tomatoes and it had a blackened end. After explaining to her that her tomatoes were lacking in calcium, I was thinking that she is probably not alone. If your tomatoes are starting to ripen and you notice a brown/black end on your tomato, you have Blossom End Rot, which is a calcium deficiency. Give your tomato plants some calcium in the form of bone meal, Dolomite Lime or even milk powder. Mix it into the soil around the plant. Apply every couple of weeks. Save your egg shells as well, although they take some time to break down. Crush them and break them down as best as you can and then work them into the soil around the plant. Make sure you give your tomatoes enough water to allow the plant to uptake the calcium from the soil, but, never water overtop of your tomatoes, only around the root area. .I used Orgunique 4-3-7 Tomato and Vegetable Fertilizer last year and I swear by it. I was so late in planting my tomatoes, I didn’t expect to be eating tomatoes in July, but, by using Orgunique’s Tomato and Vegetable Fertilizer, I was enjoying large, tasty tomatoes in no time. It is 100% organic and contains all the nutrients needed for tomatoes and other vegetables. Applied monthly, it promotes strong stems, flower and fruit set. It contains added calcium which discourages Blossom End Rot and kelp which stimulates growth in all stages of plant development. Read my blog on Tomatoes for more Tomato tips and tricks. Arlene Ortiz (Wheeler)
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Seeding Your Lawn and Laying Sod by Arlene

Arlene’s Tips on Seeding Your Lawn and Laying Sod

Fall time is an optimum time for laying sod or seeding your lawn as the weather is not too hot, precipitation is prevalent and the conditions are ideal for establishing turf.

The fall is the best time to over-seed your lawn as well, so as in the spring, the new grass will help choke out any weeds.

If you are seeding a new lawn or laying sod, as in everything else in the garden, preparation is the key. Prepare the ground.
TIP - In our clay soil, work in some organic matter such as peat moss. Do not add sand as it will pack harder and become like concrete.
Slope the soil away from the house. Remove rocks, weeds and any other debris that could prevent good contact with the soil. Till to a depth of 4 – 6 inches and insure all big clumps are broken up. You may want to add a good quality top soil, 3-way mix or just plain peat moss.
TIP - If you are using peat moss, mix it in a large muck bucket with water to prevent it from blowing away to your neighbours before applying it to the lawn.
Rake the soil to an even level. Water the soil, purchase a good quality grass seed and apply it according to directions. Push a lawn roller over the seed or tamp it down to help it make better contact with the soil. Unless it makes contact with the soil, it will not germinate. Keep it moist but not drenched and don’t water it so heavily, the seed washes away. Don’t let the seed dry out! The seed needs soil, water, warm temperature and nutrients to germinate.

The same preparation as above is needed if you are laying sod.
TIP - If you are unable to lay the sod as soon as it is delivered, lay the sod pieces out in a shady area and do not leave the sod stacked in piles.
Start laying the sod against a straight edge like a sidewalk or driveway and lay the sod so the rows are perpendicular to your house. Unroll the first piece of sod, keeping it tight against the straight edge as you go. Butt the second piece tightly against the first, without stretching either piece and keep in mind that sod pieces will shrink as they dry out. Start the second row with a partial piece of sod as the seams between the end of one strip and the beginning of the next should be offset like brickwork. After completion, use a roller to compress the sod slightly to help the roots make contact with the soil.
TIP – Don’t let the sod dry out. Begin watering the sod within about thirty minutes after installing to encourage rooting and preventing it from drying out.
Keep the sod moist after installation but don’t soak the area. Water in the morning, if possible, so the grass has a chance to dry before nightfall. Leaving grass wet overnight, encourages disease. Newly laid sod requires about 1 inch of water every 2 – 3 days, depending on the soil temperature and rainfall. Once established, 1 inch of water every 4 – 7 days is sufficient. Allow the grass to grow for a couple of weeks and then mow to about 2 inches. Never remove over 1/3 of the leaf blade when mowing.
TIP – Over time, decrease watering to encourage deeper root growth.
Try to keep children and pets off the area until your new lawn is established and until after the second mowing.

Watch Arlene on Breakfast TV Thursday mornings - Check out one of her segments!

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:06 AM 1 Comments

Friday, July 06, 2012

Arlene’s Tips for Aphids, Spider Mite and Fungus

Arlene’s Tips for Aphids, Spider Mite and Fungus

1. Aphids – To get rid of Aphids, mix 15ml (1 Tbsp) of liquid soap and 240ml ( 1 cup of Vegetable Oil) together.  Add 2 tsp. of the blend to 3.81 (.83) gal) of water, but don’t use it on squash, cauliflower, or cabbage, which can suffer leaf burn.  Spray the plants with the mixture and follow with a spray of water.  Wait about 15 minutes and then repeat.  If the infestation has just started, this will do the trick, otherwise, you may have to resort to using chemical control.
2. Spider Mite – When it is hot and dry – the spider mite is about!  You may see very time holes in the leaves.  Cucumber is susceptible to the Spider Mite.  Spider Mites do not like cold water so spray down with the hose.  A good test for Spider Mite is to put a white sheet of paper under the branch.  Tap the branch and if you see tiny red dots on the paper, you have a Spider Mite problem.
3. Fungus – Fungus is usually a result of poor air circulation or cold nights when there is moisture on the plant. My home-made solution to fungus is to spray the plant with a solution of 3 Tablespoons of baking soda to a gallon of water.  This must be done on a regular basis.  Never spray your plants when they are dry or when the sun is shining on them, always do it in the early morning, if possible.

Always keep your plants and trees well watered, especially during hot weather and keep them well fertilized.  Never water at night.  If the leaves are wet over-night, this will attract both insects and disease!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 11:38 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Thanks for attending our Spring Seminars

I want to thank everyone who attended our Spring seminar day April14th, 2012. We had over 50 people over the course of the day! We all enjoyed the day very much!
Jennifer gave her first seminar - Gardening for Dummies! It was fun, humerous, and informative! Way to go Jennifer! We definitely will have to repeat that seminar!
Sue had a interesting discussion panel on all those nasty critters that lurk in your yards waiting to eat your plants!! Critter's Anomynous was a great success! Grant Dunn came and introduced some great new products. He went over all the products we carry for different garden concerns. Thanks Grant! We look forward to staff training next week. And Bill Dowie our resident Master Gardener gave 2 interesting seminars on 3D and 4D gardening.
 

ca.linkedin.com/in/williamdowie -Check our Bill's Profile

Now that the seminars are done we will be out setting up our tree, shrub, perennial, and display gardens outside. New stock starts arriving April 18th! With this weather we already have a waiting list going for trees as they come in the door! It is going to be a exciting spring! Drop by and check out what is new at Jensen's this spring!
Tammy
 
3D and 4D as presented by Bill Dowie -

William (Bill) Dowie BA, MCPM, LEED-AP (O+M)
Independent Environmental Consultant
Master Gardener Program Graduate
Guest Design Consultant

 3-D Gardening Designing to maximize all the Space in your yard and garden Many gardeners have the knowledge and skills to move vertically in their garden;

3-D gardening is so much more. Inter-spaces, nooks and crannies, cracks, edges, layers... these are key concepts to make your garden beautiful while increasing the amount of usable space – so you can plant all those varieties of flowers and vegetables you’ve been eyeing. Think you have run out of room? Wondering how to increase bio-diversity in your small yard? This first of two seminars will introduce you to spatial concepts of the space-time continuum you may have not have thought about.
Concepts Discussed…

shapes in space = x-y flat | z-vertical | beyond simple planar vertical
small cracks and openings have large volumes behind / under them
raised beds (bonus = 4-D benefits)
polar coordinates – vectors and angles in space
tree limbs and pruning – how you want the tree to grow in 20 years = where
micro-spaces in your yard (frost movement | solar gain | nooks and coziness)
plant size (intra / inter)
landscape ecology and edge
wildlife & naturalization – from the sub-basement to the penthouse
the underground world – The Douglas Fir = Mother Tree (“Smarty Plants” – NoT, CBC)
Jensen’s Nursery Spring Seminar Series


http://ca.linkedin.com/in/williamdowie
cwcdesigngroup@yahoo.ca
204-888-8012
Residential Walkabouts | Urban-scape Enhancements | Landscape Design-Build
www.jensennursery.com/blog/post.cfm?Title=Free_Spring_Gardening_Seminars_-_April_14,_2012
William (Bill) Dowie BA, MCPM, LEED-AP (O+M)
Independent Environmental Consultant
Master Gardener Program Graduate
Guest Design Consultant

 4-D Gardening Thinking about the aspects of Time for your short and long-term garden plans Time is fleeting. As humans, we are caught in a linear perception of time passing second by second, year by year. In Nature, the concept of time is irrelevant. Nature is dictated by cycles – ebbs and flows of matter and energy. So how do we reconcile such philosophical ideas to make a beautiful garden? This seminar will explore the themes of legacy planting, time-framing your designs, plant succession, and the young-to-old transition of your human and animal visitors to your yard (that rabbit seems like it is 20 years old!). This second of two seminars will introduce you to the temporal concepts of the space-time continuum you may have not have thought about.

Concepts Discussed
time and space sometimes is the same thing (for us humans and social insects)
natural cycles v. human calendar (the time honored battle)
legacy – what stage in life are you at? Stakeholder needs and alignment
time scale – shifts with weather & climate (from seconds to centuries)
maintenance time scales = mowing | watering | weeding | dividing | pruning
intra / inter-seasonality | dormancy | active growing
critical timings – veggies and growth | blooming periods
when to plant / transplant
succession – from lawn to natural prairie to forest (if that’s what you want)
garden philosophy – time and space – just have fun (please)!
Jensen’s Nursery Spring Seminar Series
April 14th, 2012 (live, on location)
Welcome to the space-time continuum of gardening... What? This sounds like science fiction - something you would hear on The Big Bang Theory... but yes, even gardeners have to know about the multi-dimensions of the universe to make their gardens beautiful and sustainable... Intrigued?

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:58 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

Free Spring Gardening Seminars - April 14, 2012

Wow this weather is feeling alot like spring!  If you go into our greenhouse it feels like summer. We have planted 100's of beautiful hanging baskets! Exciting new perenials will start arriving this week! We even are planning to rearrange the greenhouse to accommodate weekly Free Container Gardening Seminars! Subscribe to our webmail to get up to date times of these seminars. There will be limited space so don't miss out. Bring in your empty pot and go home with a beautiful pot of flowers. The best part is you leave the mess with us! If you need a new pot we have a great selection of containers available to purchase.
 
This year we are holding FREE SPRING GARDENING SEMINARS ON SATURDAY APRIL 14, 2012! We will suppling a FREE LUNCH to everyone who registers! Seating is limited to register early at tammy@jensennursery.com .


FREE SPRING GARDENING SEMINARS AT JENSEN NURSERY AND GARDEN CENTER

10:00 AM Gardening  for Dummies – By Jennifer Fletcher
Gardening advice presented in a simple easy to understand format

Healthy, happy and hardy.  Pampered, pretty and pruned.  These will be the words you use to describe the plants in your yard after you have attended this informative seminar.

11:00 AM 3-D Gardening – By Bill Dowie
Designing to maximize all the Space in your yard and garden
 
Some adventurous gardeners may have the knowledge and skills to move vertically in their garden, but 3-D gardening is so much more.  Inter-spaces, nooks and crannies, cracks, edges, layers... these are key concepts to make your garden beautiful while increasing the amount of usable space you can plant all your flowers and vegetables.  Think you have run out of room?  Wondering how to increase bio-diversity in your small yard?  This first of two seminars will introduce you to spacial concepts of the space-time continuum you may have not thought about.

12:00 NOON FREE LUNCH

 12:30 PM Critters Anomynous – By Susan Jensen Stubbe and Tammy Jensen
 An Open Panel Discussion on how to keep wildlife from eating your trees and plants

Does wildlife affect your plant’s health? An open panel discussion on methods both natural and chemical to keep your yard wildlife free. Audience participation appreciated!  Instead of waiting till it is too late be proactive and prevent the damage that can happen. Help others with any solutions you may have. Enjoy a healthy happy yard – not one ravaged by squirrels, voles, deers, and rabbits!

1:30 PM 4-D Gardening – By Bill Dowie
Thinking about the aspects of Time for your short and long-term garden plans
 
Time is fleeting and as humans we are caught in a linear perception of time passing second by second, year by year.  In Nature, the concept of time is irrelevant.  Nature is dictated by cycles and ebbs and flows of matter and energy.  So how do we reconcile such philosophical ideas to make a beautiful garden?  This seminar will explore the themes of legacy planting, time-framing your designs, plant succession, and the young-to-old transition of your human and animal visitors to your yard (that rabbit seems like it's 20 years old!).  This second of two seminars will introduce you to temporal concepts of the space-time continuum you may have not thought about.

Email tammy@jensennursery.com to register. Specify the seminars you wish to attend and if you will be joining us for lunch. Limited seating so register early

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 1:31 PM 1 Comments