Tuesday, August 09, 2022

Cherry Trees

 
Cherry Trees now in stock! Grow your own food.

Cupid Cherry (tree form)
  $49.99 3 feet/$69.99  4-5 feet
                                                              
 
Height:  12 feet     Spread:  7 feet
 
Sunlight:  full sun 
 
Hardiness Zone:  2
 
Description: 
An early bloomer with large dark red to black cherries that are sweet and slightly astringent; fruit matures in late summer to early fall and excellent for fresh eating and processing; vigorous and hardy, pruned to a single stem.
 
Crimson Passion Cherry (tree form) $69.99 4-5 feet
 
Height:  12 feet     Spread:  8 feet
 
Sunlight:  full sun 
 
Hardiness Zone:  2
 
Description: 
A cross between the tart cherry and the Mongolian cherry produces a high sugar content which makes for excellent fresh eating; the fruit is large and dark red in color; pruned to a single trunk.
 
Juliet Cherry (tree form) $69.99 4-5 feet
 
Height:  12 feet     Spread:  7 feet
 
Sunlight:  full sun 
 
Hardiness Zone:  2
 
Description: 
An excellent small fruit tree with abundant beautiful dark red fruit in summer that is great for fresh eating; pruned to a single stem, this cultivar is vigorous, hardy, and is quite attractive in a landscape setting.
 
 
Romeo Cherry (tree form) $69.99 4-5 feet
 
Height:  12 feet
 
Spread:  7 feet
 
Sunlight:  full sun 
 
Hardiness Zone:  2
 
Description: 
A wonderful new introduction with fruit that is excellent for juicing and has good eating and processing qualities; a vigorous and hardy small tree that is lovely as a garden accent or focal point as well.
 
Evans Cherry (Tree form) $79.99 6-7 feet
 
Height:  15 feet
 
Spread:  10 feet
 
Sunlight:  full sun 
 
Hardiness Zone:  3
 
Other Names:  Sour Cherry
 
Description: 
A compact fruit tree, the ideal size for backyard orchards; showy white flowers in spring followed by loads of bright red sour cherries in mid summer, excellent for pies and jam; needs full sun and well-drained soil, self-pollinating; extremely hardy.
 
 Carmine Jewel Cherry (tree form) $69.99 4-5 feet
 
Height:  12 feet     Spread:  7 feet
 
Sunlight:  full sun 
 
Hardiness Zone:  2
 
evans cherry tree, jensen nursery, winnipeg
 
See more information on Cherry Trees - Jensen Nursey Cherry Trees
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:30 AM 1 Comments

Sunday, March 06, 2022

Starting Seeds Indoors

What  better thing to do on a snowy winter day, than to start some seeds! We have had such a long cold winter, we need to see some hint of spring.   
 
When: It’s a great time to start planning you vegetable garden and gathering your supplies to start seeding inside.  The best time to seed inside is Mid March to April. Refer to our Seed Starting Chart for the best time for seeding vegetables and herbs. For flower seeds, just check on the package how many weeks to seed before the last frost. Then you can count back from May 24th. 
 
Which Seed: Which seeds 
should I be starting you ask.  The best ones are Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Leeks, Kohlrabi, Peppers and tomatoes.  You can try other seeds but most will germinate and establish quite quickly when directly sown into the ground.  Most of your root vegetables won’t transplant well, thus they have t
o be sown directly.  Also let’s not forget fresh herbs.
 
Pots and Containers: Seeds are best planted in individual pots or trays with individual cells to make transplanting easy.  You can use plastic or peat pots, yogurt containers and egg cartons.  Almost any container will work but make sure there are drainage holes in the bottom.  Seeds and young seedlings don’t like to have we
t feet.  If you are reusing plastic pots be sure to soak them in warm water and bleach at a rate of 9 parts water to 1part bleach to kill any pathogens or bacteria that is present.
 
Soil Mixture: A nice sterilized peat mixture is a great soil to seed in.  Such as Terra Organic Potting Soil.  In a larger container, such as a rubber maid container place you soil and add water to moisten it.  You want it to be moist but not dripping wet.  Fill your containers to ¼” below the top and pat it down.  Place two or three seeds in each container and then cover with soil.  To water the seed I like to use a spray bottle.  A watering can be too forceful and wash the seeds out of the container.
 
Where and Watering: Place the pots in a sunny warm location.  On top of your fridge is an excellent warm spot.  Keep the soil moist.  As the seedling grows it is a good idea to let the top layer of soil dry out between watering.  This will help prevent the plants from rotting or damping off.
 
Thinning Out: Once the seedlings have started to grow it is best to thin them out so that you leave the strongest growing one in the container.
 
Hardening Off: As we approach the transplanting time, which is usually End of May beginning of June in Manitoba, you will need to harden your plants off.  To take them directly outside and plant into the garden would be shock for most plants.  Hardening off is quite easy.  A week before you plan to transplant the plants you need to move them outside into a sheltered spot of a little bit each day.  Start with a two hour period the first day and increase it one hour a day for the rest of the week.
 
Planting Out
: Make sure the plants are thoroughly moist a few hours before transplanting.  This will help the soil stay on the roots.  The best time to transplant is on a cloudy day, late in the afternoon.  This will allow the plants to get use to their surrounding before the hot sun is on them.  Gently tip the plants and take them out of their pots taking as much of the soil as you can.  Place them into a hole that is slightly larger than the pot.  Lightly pack the soil around them and water in.  Continue watering daily until new grow appears.  At this stage let the soil slightly dry between watering.
 
 
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:17 PM 0 Comments

Saturday, June 08, 2019

Cottage Gardens

 “Cottage Garden” style is relaxed, colorful, scented, fun and almost no rules should apply, whimsy.  The best thing about cottage gardens, .. there is always room to squeeze more plants in - use hanging baskets & window boxes.
 
Tips for Creating a Cottage Garden
 
Keep it small,  lol.
You need a good mix of plants, native plants  / sturdy plants / deer & rabbit resistance.
Avoid straight lines, gardens & paths should be winding.
Start by planting large clumps of like flowers/plants.  Tulips, daisies, allium, coneflowers, sage …
Repeat both plants and colors, to create a flow and harmony.
Tall plants add archetypal (spikes); scatter liberally through the borders; hollyhock, lupins, foxglove, wisteria, catmint, delphinium, phlox, grasses. 
Invest in Good Soil
Water source via soaker hose, rain barrels, ?   

The right plant in the right place -  aka full shade .. to full sun etc.,
Select sturdy garden plants, spring-flowering bulbs, purple coneflower, Irises, wild indigo,  Stella d’oro or happy returns daylilies, asters, Russian sage, an old fashion rose climber, peonies…, for foliage interest try blue fescue, lambs ear,
Don't forget scents, honeysuckles, roses, peonies, rosemary, mock-orange  and lavender.
 Create a special place to sit and enjoy the garden.  
Need help ASK US, … 
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:40 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, July 03, 2018

Shade Plants

 The beautiful thing about gardening is that your design constantly evolves. The level of sun or shade in your garden can change as well. 
 
You may live in a neighborhood dominated by huge shade trees,  or perhaps some spots shaded by buildings. 
 
With only two to three hours of sunlight, sun-lovers will struggle, but plants that like part shade will do well.
 
Usually, shade and part-shade plants will do best where they don’t get hot afternoon sun.
 
Here are some perennials to grow in lower light situations: astilbe, hosta, cranesbill, bleeding hearts, foxgloves, ferns, columbine, coral bells, goatsbeard, monkshood,

ajuga, and brunnera.  There are also shrubs that will thrive in shady areas such as:

select hydrangeas, viburnum, false spirea and euonymus.  
 
Remember that most perennial flowers and roses do best in full sun. That means at least six hours of full sun.
 
Drop in and we can help you find the right plant for the shady areas of your yard.
hydrangea, shade plants, Winnipeg garden centers
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 5:05 PM 0 Comments

Monday, June 25, 2018

Astilbes for the Shade Garden

 SHADE PLANT FEATURE:    Astible  
Astilbe is a tall, summertime bloomer that adds interest and texture to the garden even after the pink, white or red flowers have dried up and turned brown.  
 
Their leaf foliage is feathery and clumps at the base of the plant. 
 
The heights vary depending on kind,  15 inches to 30 inches.
 
Deer do not particularly like them.    
 
astilbe, shade plants, winnipeg garden centers
 






































Growing Tip:    Astibles benefit from a bit of protection to get them through the severe winters, a fine layer of mulch, such as chopped leaves or straw.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:41 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Long Weekend Flowers

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 Well, ..we are well under way both inside the greenhouse & outside @ Jensen’s Nursery, you can feel the excitement as many gardeners awaited their initial planting this May long weekend. Remember though it is early to plant annuals and most vegetables outside. There is still a chance of frost. Cold hardy onions, potatoes, and garlic bulbs could go in now for sure. If you a way to cover in case of frost or move containers into garages. Then plant away but watch the weather!
 
Our greenhouse is dazzling with many of our hanging baskets spilling over with colour and gardeners both new and old have been filling their shopping boxes with favourite plants.  A simple rule for planting pots is to have 3 different types of plants; the thriller being the focal or tallest plant in the container, the fillers should be of complimentary colours and shorter than the thriller, and last but not least, the spiller to add the dramatic draping of colour to your container.
 
The outside area has display tables of rows of perennials that will continue to change as they grow til  blooming and many display areas of shrubs and trees that are just now waking up as they fully leaf out.
 
Whether you have a shade spot or a sunny spot we have some great suggestions to help build your containers, gardens and landscaping.
Gardening can be a very rewarding activity. With a little time and effort, you can watch your creativity blossom and your ideal outdoor space flower.
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greenhouse, flowers, hanging baskets, coleus, basket stuffers, winnipegs best greenhouse
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:59 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Oh No My Evergreens look brown!

 As the snow recedes and we are spending more and more time outside we are starting to see what the winter has done to our yards.  One of the first signs of how tough the winter has been is the color of our evergreens.  A lot of the cedars, spruce and pines around the city are a lovely shade of brown.  Most people’s first reaction is that the plant is dead.  This is most likely not the case.  The buds for this years growth will still be alive, they are just waiting for some heat to start growing.  Once the new growth flushes out it will cover up the brown needles .  To help the process along you need to start fertilizing and watering your evergreens as soon as the snow is gone.   A fertilizer that is high in Nitrogen ( the first number on the formula) is the best.  Miracle Gro  water soluble Evergreen and Acid Loving Plant Food is an excellent source of nitrogen with a formula of 28-10-10.  In a typical watering can ( 2 gallon) you add 2 tablespoons of fertilizer.  Soak the soil that is around the plant to feed the roots.  For best results apply the fertilizer every two weeks throughout May and June.  As for watering, a deep watering every week unless it rains.

 

Susan Jensen Stubbe

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:02 PM 0 Comments