Saturday, June 30, 2018

Purple Coneflowers

  DROUGHT TOLERANT & PERENNIAL :   Purple Coneflower      
 
This coneflower is the original native form, single purple-pink petals surrounding a dark center, which has a long bloom time.
 
Coneflowers are very resilient.
 
Coneflowers now come in many different varieties (single, double, or triple types) and colours (white, raspberry, orange, red  and yellow) .
 
Coneflowers generally grow 2 to 3 feet tall with a spread of 2 feet. 
 
They bloom from early summer until fall.
 
They’re a favorite with butterflies and bees.
 
They make excellent cut flowers for indoor bouquets. 
Prefers full to part sun with average to dry, well-drained soil. 
 
The roots, leaves, and flowers are medicinal,  
 
Self sows if seed heads are left to overwinter.
 
 purple coneflower, drought tolerant flowers, drought tolerant perennials, winnipeg garden centers, perennials winnipeg, purple perennials
 
 
 
 















Growing Tip: Single-flowering forms often live longer than the double or triple types.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:41 AM 0 Comments

Sunday, June 24, 2018

Peonies

 BEST & EASIEST PERENNIALS:
Peony  
Talk about dependable!
 
Peonies last for years with very little help from you.
 
Peonies form pretty, 3-foot tall mounds of foliage that burst into bloom in mid-spring; May to June.
 
The plants are available in single, double, or semi-double forms, and flowers range in colors and bi-colors.
 
Peony blooms can be highly fragrant and make extraordinary spring bouquets for weddings or graduations.
 
They require a sunny garden spot that’s well drained—they don’t like heavy, mucky soil.
 
 peony, jensen nursery, winnipeg garden centres, flowers to plant
 
 
 
 
 









Growing Tip:    Peonies require a period of cold and darkness to bloom well.
 
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:42 AM 0 Comments

Monday, April 16, 2018

Spring and your evergreens

 One of the first signs of how tough the winter has been is the color of our evergreens.  A lot of the cedars, spruce and pines around the city are a lovely shade of brown.  Most people’s first reaction is that the plant is dead.  This is most likely not the case.  The buds for this years growth will still be alive, they are just waiting for some heat to start growing.  Once the new growth flushes out it will cover up the brown needles.  To help the process along you need to start fertilizing and watering your evergreens as soon as the snow is gone.   A fertilizer that is high in Nitrogen (the first number on the formula) is the best.  An Evergreen Food with the formula 30-10-10 is an excellent source of nitrogen.  Soak the soil that is around the plant to feed the roots.  For best results apply the fertilizer every two weeks throughout May and June.  As an extra boost you can also spray the foliage with Organique’s Biofish.  This should be done once the ground has thawed.  As for watering, a deep watering every week unless it rains.
 
 
Susan Jensen Stubbe
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:10 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, April 03, 2018

Free Spring Gardening Seminars

FREE SPRING SEMINARS

Saturday April 14th 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
 
Free Lunch - Deals - Draws - Grand Prize Draw
 
9:00-10:00     Grant Dunn   "Spring Yard Care"
 
Spring may not be here yet but it is coming! Are you ready for all the challenges your yard may bring you? Lawn not looking good? Shrubs looking rough? Worried about insects, fungus, rabbits or deer? Grant has a solution for almost everything! Grant has a wealth of knowledge about garden products that can help beautify and protect your yard and garden.
 
"Growing a Cutting Garden in Manitoba"
 lilystone gardens, growing a cut flower garden, wedding flowers, jensen nursery
Lily Stone Gardens is a year round floral design shop and seasonal cut flower farm located about 35 minutes south of Winnipeg just outside of Rosenort, MB. We have been growing flowers at Lily Stone for 7 years now. We started our business by growing flowers for farmers markets in Winnipeg but have now shifted the business in a slightly different direction and currently supply flowers for my own flower shop, weddings, and multiple other florists in Manitoba with locally grown flowers during our seasonal months. We grow flowers on approximately 1.5 cultivated garden acres and grow over 20 - 30 varieties of cut flowers. A large part of our business is designing for weddings. We currently design weddings for around 50 - 60 couples per year as well as offer bulk flowers for DIY weddings. It has become a strong passion of mine to also supply high quality, strongly demanded cut flower varieties to Manitoba Florists. This year we plan to expand our business by offering a CSA subscription and multiple workshops on growing cut flowers on a small scale as well design workshops.
 




 
11:30-12:30 FREE LUNCH
 
12:45-1:45 Tiffany Grenkow   
"Working smarter not harder in your garden"
 
Bio - Owner of Winnipeg Sweet Potato Tiffany Grenkow cultivates specialty produce for local restaurants and markets. Rarely turning down more gardens, she is also an orchard steward at Sustainable South Osborne community commons/food forest and garden club instructor.
An urban farmer shares simple tricks employed by micro farms to best utilize your space, time and available resources. Learn innovative strategies that enrich gardens with less effort and strain on the system. Whether you tend a food or flower garden anyone will benefit from a sustainable regenerative approach. Working in step with the environment and mimicking natures plan tends to waste less money, require less physical labour and burn fewer fossil fuels. Whether it's retaining moisture, suppressing weeds or restoring the health of your soil- gardening need not be so much work.
 
 2:00-3:00     Susan Jensen Stubbe 
" 2018 New Plants & Favorite Plants"
 
Susan will do a slide show of some of our new and exciting plants for 2018. She will also present on some of her all time favorites! 
Invincibelle Mini Mauvette Hydrangea, new hydrangea, jensen nursery, flowering plants










 






 
 
succulents, planting workshops, plant succulents, jensen nursery

3:15-4:15    Planting Workshop  
 
 
Plant up a pot of spring!    Bring a pot or buy a pot! Free Soil with miniature gardens, small terrariums, succulents and cacti.
  
 












PLEASE REGISTER AT tammy@jensennursery.com with the following information: 
Name:
Phone #:
Are you attending the full day or individual seminars?
List seminars if not attending the full day.
Are you attending the Planting Workshop?
 
We will having a Free Draw including a Grand Prize featuring some of our favorite local Winnipeg businesses!
This prize will include a 1 hour float from Winnipeg's Best Float Spa!
Check them out at Jellyfish Float Spa!
Watch more details on this Grand Prize!
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:29 PM 0 Comments

Monday, September 19, 2016

Gardening Seminar Links

Wow did we ever have a lot of people out for our Fall Fiesta Seminars this year!
Thank you to our presenters...Bill Dowie, Susan Jensen Stubbe & Colleen Zacharias!
Thank you to everyone who came out to enjoy the day!
If you missed the day - no worries - here are links to some of the seminars you missed. I will be adding more to this list later.

Pruning - with Susan Jensen Stubbe
Dividing Perennials & Fall Care - with Susan Jensen Stubbe
Food for Thought - will Bill Dowie
Fall Bulbs - with Colleen Zacharias

Here are some more great fall gardening tips for you as well!

 

Fall Yard Care

Fall Composting

Fall Gardening Advice

Overwintering Bulbs

Tulips and Fall Bulbs


gardening seminars, seminars, garden advice, jensen nursery and garden centre, winnipeg garden centres
Full house at our Fall Fiesta Seminar Day on September 17, 2016
full

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:33 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, October 01, 2015

Fall Yard & Garden Care

Download Attachment...
 FALL HAS ARRIVED!
TIME TO PREPARE YOUR YARD FOR THE WINTER (BRRR!) AHEAD!

DEER, RABBITS & VOLE PROTECTION
Soon the deer, rabbits and small critters like mice and voles will be looking for new sources of food. Once the leaves are gone and the grass is covered by snow these animals will turn to the next closest source. Which is usually our valued trees and shrubs. So before the snow comes you need to protect your plants. Here are some options to help protect your yard.
 
SKOOT - APPLY WHEN SHRUBS & TREES ARE DORMANT
Applying skoot is one of the best methods to protect your plants. Skoot is a repellent that was developed to taste bad to the animals, after one taste they won't come back for more. It is can be applied once the trees and shrubs are dormant. But before it gets below zero during the day time.
 
You can apply Skoot by painting the undiluted product directly on the bark or by diluting it with equal parts of water and spraying it on the plants using a pump sprayer. This is the easiest way by far. For shrubs, you want to apply a light spray of Skoot starting at the base of the plant and going approximately four to five feet high. You have to picture how high up can a rabbit reach when it is sitting on top of the snow in mid winter. 
 
For trees you want a light spray on all sides of the trunk and on the lower branches again in the 4-5 ft range. Make sure that you get all sides of the trunk.
 
DOKTOR DOOM - NO BITE - APPLY ANYTIME
NEW! No Bite Animal Repellant
 
New from the Doktor Doom line of products is No Bite, a long lasting animal repellant for both wild and domestic animals. Works for both wild and domestic animals and works on a wide variety of animals; deer, cats & dogs, porcupines, mice & voles and more. Even works on some species of birds. With just two applications the plant will deter pests for up to one whole year. Active ingredient is denatonium benzoate - the bitterest compound known. Unlike blood based/fear repellants, No Bite contains Cedar Oil. The addition of this fragrance means it can be used near patios and sitting areas. The pressurized container makes it very easy to apply, sprays in any direction. Can be applied to both plant material and hard surfaces such as fences.
 
 
PLANTSKYDD - Can be sprayed on trees and shrubs to prevent deer and rabbits from eating your plants over the fall season. It will not last all winter so it would have to be reapplied mid winter by using warm water in the sprayer. It can also be sprayed over a lawn after you have done your final cut. This will prevent voles from wrecking your lawn. It is a great product to dip your tulips in before you plant. This will stop the squirells from digging them up!

GARDENS AND BEDS
 
Dig up and discard annuals, and vegetable plants to put in your compost pile. Dig up and discard any weeds in the garbage. Rake up any fallen leaves and debris in your flower beds. Fallen leaves can hold diseases that may overwinter.If you did have fungus on your plants work garden sulphur into the soil to prevent fungus from recurring in that spot next year. Remove summer bulbs and store in peat moss or vermiculite indoors for the winter. Apply Granual Gypsum to your flowers beds, and gardens.This can be tilled into the soil. It is a soil conditioner that will soften hard and clay soils. It also improves soil drainage and helps maintain a healthy balance of nutrients for the plants. Get your beds ready for fall planting or spring gardening. Add organic matter such as peat moss, Turkey Trot, coco, compost, or manure.This can help improve aeration and drainage, as well as supply nutrients. This can be done in addition to granular gypsum to give the soil a really good boost for next year. Plant your tulips using bulb food and fresh garden soil. Soak the bulbs in Plantskydd prior to planting to prevent squirrels from digging them up! Plant shrubs, evergreens, and perennials. FALL SALE ON -  20% OFF ALL PLANTS AND WEEKLY HALF PRICE DEALS! Early fall planting gives new plants enough time to get their roots established before winter. Use a growth supplement such as Myke to help stimulate healthy roots, and prevent transplant shock.
 
SHRUBS, TREES, PERENNIALS
 
Put down fertilizer spikes in late October ( 3 spikes for every 2" of trunk at chest height) When spring arrives, the fertilizer spikes will break down early with the heat and moisture and will give your tree an early boost! We have "Evergreen Spikes" "Tree Spikes" and "Fruit Tree Spikes" available!
 
A treatment of Myke can be given to any shrubs or trees that have been stressed or not growing well. This is done by putting holes in the ground around the root ball of the shrub or tree. The Myke is poured down the holes, then watered in.
If your plants have had problems with fungus, mold, mildew, blight, or insects Dormant Oil will prevent these from wintering over. It can be applied once the leaves have dropped if the temperature is above 5 degrees Celcius. It also can be applied in early spring when the buds on the plants are swollen, but before they leaf out. Perennials can be moved or split safely now. Use a growth supplement such as Myke to stimulate new root growth. Spring flowering perennials can be cut back. Fall flowering perennials can be left to enjoy over the winter. At the end of October peat moss can be mounded around sensitive plants and perennials to protect over winter.
Water regularly till the ground is frozen.

EVERGREEN AND CEDAR CARE
 
Fertilize with Evergreen Spikes in late October.
If evergreens have been stressed over the summer a treatment of Myke around the roots will help it repair any root damage that may have occurred.
Throughout September and October water evergreens weekly so they can build up their water stores until spring. The moisture is important to help them through our harsh winters. Any cedars that are in a sunny location can be sprayed with an antitranspirant Wilt-Pruf to protect against spring moisture loss. Any newly planted cedars can be protected with burlap and a frame made with wooden stakes. It is very important that the burlap does not touch the cedars.

FALL LAWN CARE

1. APPLY FALL FERTILIZER NOW, IF NOT OVERSEEDING YOUR LAWN.
 
2. APPLY PLANTSKYDD TO PREVENT VOLE DAMAGE
 
3. IF OVERSEEDING - MOW GRASS TO ABOUT 1 ½ " OVERSEEDING IS SEEDING OVER EXISTING GRASS TO FILL IN BARE PATCHES AND THICKEN UP THE GRASS TO CHOKE OUT WEEDS.
 
4. BAG OR RAKE UP ALL THE GRASS CLIPPINGS.
 
5. DO A CORE AERATION - JUST PUT ON YOUR GOLF SHOES AND WALK OVER THE LAWN!!!
 
6. SPREAD ABOUT ¼ " OF SCREENED TOPSOIL OR PEAT MOSS AND RAKE IT IN. I LIKE USING PEAT MOSS AS IT HAS NO WEEDS. WHEN USING PEAT MOSS, PUT IT IN A WHEELBARROW OR MUCK BUCKET AND ADD WATER UNTIL IT BECOMES LIKE A THICK SOUP. THEN APPLY IT TO YOUR LAWN AND RAKE IT IN.
 
7.CHOOSE A GOOD QUALITY OF GRASS SEED PREFERABLY WITH A LOT OF DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF FESCUE, RYE AND KENTUCKY BLUE GRASS.
 
8.BROADCAST THE SEED WITH A GRASS OR FERTILIZER SPREADER.
 
9.. USE A ROLLER OR TAMP THE GRASS SEED DOWN WITH YOUR RAKE. IT MUST COME IN CONTACT WITH THE SOIL TO GERMINATE.
 
10. WATER.
 
11. DORMANT SEEDING IS DONE MID TO LATE OCTOBER, JUST BEFORE THE FIRST SNOW. SEEDS WILL LAY DORMANT UNDER THE SOIL AND GERMINATE IN EARLY SPRING WITH THE HEAT AND MOISTURE.
 
12. IN EARLY SPRING THE SEEDS WILL GERMINATE WITH THE HEAT AND MOISTURE AND CHOKE OUT THE WEEDS!
 
13. ENJOY A BEAUTIFUL GREEN, THICK LAWN!
 
 
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 4:40 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Starting Seeds Indoors

 Starting Seeds Indoors 
 
Ah the snow is finally melting; the streets and cars are full on grime.  Everyone is walking a little lighter, smiling a little more and the neighbours are emerging from their dens.  In the cold of winter it seems our greetings become a quick wave or grunt in passing.  Now I look up and down or street and there are little gatherings of people talking about the spring.   
 
When: It’s a great time to start planning you vegetable garden and gathering your supplies to start seeding inside.  The best time to seed inside is the end of March to mid April. seedlings, planting seeds indoors, seeding in winnipeg, seeds for sale in winnipeg
 
Which Seed: Which seeds should I be starting you ask.  The best ones are Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Leeks, Kohlrabi,  Peppers and Tomatoes.  You can try other seeds but most will germinate and establish quite quickly when directly sown into the ground.  Most of your root vegetables won’t transplant well, thus they have to be sown directly.  Also let’s not forget fresh herbs. 
 
Pots and Containers: Seeds are best planted in individual pots or trays with individual cells to make transplanting easy.  You can use plastic or peat pots, yogurt containers and egg cartons.  Almost any container will work but make sure there are drainage holes in the bottom.  Seeds and young seedlings don’t like to have wet feet.  If you are reusing plastic pots be sure to soak them in warm water and bleach at a rate of 9 parts water to 1part bleach to kill any pathogens or bacteria that is present. 
 
Soil Mixture: A nice sterilized peat mixture is a great soil to seed in.  Such as Premier Pro Mix Potting and Seeding Mix.  In a larger container, such as a rubber maid container place you soil and add water to moisten it.  You want it to be moist but not dripping wet.  Fill your containers to ¼” below the top and pat it down.  Place two or three seeds in each container and then cover with soil.  To water the seed I like to use a spray bottle.  A watering can be too forceful and wash the seeds out of the container. 
 
Where and Watering: Place the pots in a sunny warm location.  On top of your fridge is an excellent warm spot.  Keep the soil 
moist.  As the seedling grows it is a good idea to let the top layer of soil dry out between watering.  This will help prevent the plants from rotting or damping off. 
 
Thinning Out: Once the seedlings have started to grow it is best to thin them out so that you leave the strongest growing one in the container. 
 
Hardening Off: As we approach the transplanting time, which is usually End of May beginning of June in Manitoba, you will need to harden your plants off.  To take them directly outside and plant into the garden would be shock for most plants.  Hardening off is quite easy.  A week before you plan to transplant the plants you need to move them outside into a sheltered spot of a little bit each day.  Start with a two hour period the first day and increase it one hour a day for the rest of the week. 
 
Planting Out: Make sure the plants are thoroughly moist a few hours before transplanting.  This will help the soil stay on the roots.  The best time to transplant is on a cloudy day, late in the afternoon.  This will allow the plants to get use to their surrounding before the hot sun is on them.  Gently tip the plants and take them out of their pots taking as much of the soil as you can.  Place them into a hole that is slightly larger than the pot.  Lightly pack the soil around them and water in.  Continue watering daily until new grow appears.  At this stage let the soil slightly dry between watering. 
 
Susan Jensen Stubbe 
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:38 AM 0 Comments

Monday, October 06, 2014

The Creatures of Fall

 Well it’s that time of year again.  The leaves have turned and are starting to fall off the trees.  As my family and I walked thru
Bois-des-esprits Forest (At  St.Annes and Shorehill Rd)to visit the spirit tree, we see a family of deer running thru the forest. 
Soon the deer, rabbits and small critters like mice and voles will be looking for new sources of food.  Once the leaves are gone 
and the grass is covered by snow these animals will turn to the next closest source.  Which is usually our valued trees and shrubs.  
So before the snow comes you need to protect your plants.  Applying skoot is one of the best methods to protect your plants.
Skoot is a repellent that was developed to taste bad to the animals, after one taste they won't come back for more.  It is can be 
applied  once the trees and shrubs are dormant.  But before it gets below zero during the day time.
 
You can apply Skoot by painting the undiluted product directly on the bark or by diluting it with equal parts of water and 
spraying it on the plants using a pump sprayer.  This is the easiest way by far.
For shrubs, you want to apply a light spray of Skoot starting at the base of the plant and going approximately four to five feet high.
You have to picture how high up can a rabbit reach when it is sitting on top of the snow in mid winter.  
 
For trees you want a light spray on all sides of the trunk and on the lower branches again in the 4-5 ft range.  Make sure that you get 
all sides of the trunk.  
 
SKOOT Repellent for Rabbits, Mice and Deer concentrate when applied, will protect on an 
average the following number of plants, according to size: 
 
 Age Approx. Height Trees/litre 
 
 1yr. 0.3-0.5 metres 250-400 
 2yr. 0.5-1.0 metres 125-200 
 3yr. 1.0-2.0 metres 60-100 
 4yr. 1.0-2.5 metres 40-60 
 5yr. 2.0-4.0 metres 20-40
 
 Drop by the garden centre and we can help you with all your fall gardening questions.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:08 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Tomato School

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 TOMATO SCHOOL
 
There are two kinds of tomato plants: determinate and indeterminate.  Determinate plants grow well in a cage and do not need pruning.  Indeterminate plants need to be pruned, staked and usually have heavier yields.  
 
Tomatoes are heavy feeders - a spike or granular fertilizer at the time of planting with a small amount of water soluble fertilizer at each watering.  The fertilizer should have a low first number - nitrogen.  You should provide consistent deep watering at the roots, rather than the foliage.  It is best to cage a tomato plant to allow for better ripening, use of space and to keep the plant off the ground.  
 
Only prune indeterminate plants by pinching small suckers above the leaf branch.  You will do this only once.  You can also pinch off some of the flowers to let the plant grow bigger, riper tomatoes.  
 
 
 
To ripen green tomatoes, layer singly between sheets of newspaper in a dark box or place inside a bag with an apple.  The apple releases ethylene gas which enhances ripening.
 
There can be some problems when growing tomatoes.  Cracking can be caused by fast growth and can be controlled by consistent watering.  Blossom end rot can be caused by irregular or inadequate watering and a calcium deficiency.  Use a low nitrogen fertilizer to help the plant absorb calcium.  Lots of nitrogen in the soil will draw the calcium away from the plant.
 
Lois Hole suggests the following tomatoes:  Big Beef, Super Fantastic and Early Girl (Indeterminate) and Celebrity and Tumbler (Determinate).
 
Jennifer
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments