Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Christmas Open House Saturday and Sunday!

you are invited.....
To Our Christmas Open House
SATURDAY NOVEMBER 24 - 9-5
SUNDAY NOVEMBER 25 - 12-5

COME AND JOIN THE FUN!
25% OFF CHRISTMAS GIFTWARE THIS WEEKEND!
free santa pictures, jensen nursery

COME SEE SANTA ON SUN NOV 25 , AND DEC 2TH !

DANISH SNACKS, COFFEE, GLOGG, AND HOT CHOCOLATE
HONEY SAMPLES
SPECIALS!
FREE CHRISTMAS TREE DELIVERY SERVICE IN WINNIPEG
CHRISTMAS GIFTWARE
GARDENING GIFTS & BOOKS
FRESH WREATHS, GARLAND, SWAGS, CENTERPIECES, BOUGH
OUTDOOR CONTAINERS

FRESH CUT TREES - JUST PICK ONE AND WE WILL BRING IT HOME FOR YOU. PICK YOUR TREE AND WE WILL DELIVER IT WHEN YOU ARE READY FOR IT! WE GIVE IT A FRESH CUT, SUPPLY A TREE BAG, AND DELIVER IT IN WINNIPEG AT NO EXTRA CHARGE!!


HELP SUPPORTWINNIPEG HARVEST DROP OFF FOOD DONATIONS TODAY!
$2 FROM EVERY TREE SOLD GOES TO PENNIES FROM HEAVEN
$1 FROM EVERY WREATH AND CENTERPIECE SOLD GOES TO PENNIES FROM HEAVEN!

CHRISTMAS HOURS   ( NOTE - CHRISTMAS HOURS START SATURDAY OPEN 10-5 THIS WEEK MON TO FRI)
MON - TUES 10-5
WED - FRI 10-8
SAT 9-5
SUN 12-5



JENSEN NURSERY AND GARDEN CENTER

2550 McGillivray Blvd.
P.O. Box 12
Fort Whyte, Winnipeg, MB
R3Y 1G5
Tel: (204) 488-5042
Fax: (204) 488-5062

Email: info@jensennursery.com

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Arlene's Information on Garden Clubs and Societies in Manitoba

ARLENE’S INFORMATION ON GARDEN CLUBS AND SOCIETIES IN MANITOBA

I encourage all gardeners out there to hunt down a Garden Club or Society in your area and get out and enjoy the different programs available.  Over the winter months it’s so nice to get together with people that share your love of gardening.  Many of the Clubs offer workshops, seminars, junior gardener programs, garden tours, many knowledgeable and interesting speakers, and more.  I was with the East Kildonan Garden Club for many years and developed some great friendships with some wonderful, experienced gardeners willing to share their vast gardening expertise.  Gardeners are a special group of people. They always want to share and help all gardeners, especially those new to the gardening scene, that feel they know nothing when it comes to gardening.  The experienced gardener recognizes that they knew little when they started out.  Being involved with the Garden Club really added to my gardening knowledge and added much enjoyment in my life.

Some Clubs operate under the umbrella of the Manitoba Horticultural Association (M.H.A.) Other Clubs and Societies stand on their own. The M.H.A., a non-profit organization, established in 1895, promotes interest in horticulture and acts as a source of information to Association members and to the general public. The M.H.A. is holding their 115th Annual Convention in Brandon, January 17th, 18th and 19th, 2013 (a great winter retreat for gardeners).  They are offering some very interesting speakers and topics. Stefan Fediuk, Landscape Architect from the City of Windsor and formerly of the City of Winnipeg, will be speaking on Creating a Personal Paradise in the Garden; Lew and Tammy Wallace from Minnesota will be doing a demonstration on Arranging with Glads. They do a fabulous job.  Many of you will have seen their work displayed at St Vital Mall over the years, with the Glad and Dahlia flower show.  There are many other great guest speakers and topics such as Container Gardening With Herbs, Cacti and Succulents, Growing Tropicals in your Garden, Iris – the Median Alternative by the very experienced Barb Jackson.  Everyone will be wanting to here from Duayne Friesen from Ball Superior on “What’s New for 2013”.  There are many other interesting speakers as well.  Registration is on the Thursday with guest speakers continuing throughout the day on the Friday and Saturday. There will be a Banquet and Gardeners Auction on the Friday that is always a lot of fun. The cost is very reasonable and is a nice get-away in the middle of January. 
Check out the I Can Garden Website, www.icangarden.com/clubs/mha for more information on the Convention and a garden club near you or you can email the M.H.A. directly at www.m.h.a.@shaw.ca. There are 23 Garden Clubs and Societies under the M.H.A..

Following is a list of clubs that are not under the umbrella of the M.H.A.:

Steinbach & Area Garden Club
Gimli Garden Club
Friends of Gardens Manitoba (formerly Friends of the Conservatory)

Herb Society of Manitoba
Manitoba Orchid Society
The Manitoba Regional Lily Society
Bonsai Society of Winnipeg
Friends of the Beausejour Daylily Gardens
Landscape Manitoba
Manitoba Forage Seed Association
Manitoba People and Plants
Swan Valley Garden Club
Tent Town Garden Club

A lot of the club information can be found on the events calendar on the I Can Garden Web-site.

The Master Gardeners site also has club information, www.mgmanitoba.com/resources/garden-clubs-news.

If all else fails and you still need information on finding a club, please email me at  info@jensens.com and I will put you in touch with a great club near you!

Don’t forget to check out the Jensen Web-site for information on Gardening Seminars and Christmas Craft Classes in the up-coming months!



Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:41 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Arlene’s Houseplant Tips



Now that you have put your garden to sleep, it’s time to enjoy some indoor gardening.  With our efforts concentrated on our outdoor gardens in summer, most of us tend to neglect our houseplants.
Indoor plants can provide us with colour during the drab days of winter and also do a great job of cleaning our air.  Larger plants soften and blend with groups of furniture, while smaller plants enhance and adorn our tables and windowsills. Knowing your plant’s requirements and paying close attention to your plants will substitute for a “Green Thumb”.  Most foliage plants are native to tropical areas and enjoy a humid atmosphere with indirect light. If your plant does not receive enough light, it will soon let you know with yellowing leaves that will soon die.  A great way to increase humidity is to group your plants together or set them on trays filled with pebbles and water.  Avoid spraying your plants to increase humidity as this is only an invitation to insects and disease. 
Plants will sense the natural shortening of daylight hours and may go into dormancy as they would in their natural habitat. This is a period of inactivity where the plant remains alive but doesn’t grow.  This is a time when the amount of water and light should be decreased.  Most of our indoor plants die off because we water them too much.  Water only when the soil becomes dry to the touch about an inch below the surface.  Never allow the plant to sit in water as this will promote root rot.

Following are some of my houseplant tips.

1. Cut back on feeding houseplants.  This is the time of year the plants need a rest.  The best time to fertilize houseplants is from late January until the beginning of October.
2. Now is NOT the time to re-pot houseplants unless they are root-bound, that is, if the roots of your plant are coming through the drain holes; or if your plant has definitely outgrown its container, otherwise, the best time is in the spring.
3. Healthy houseplants require good air circulation, so it’s important to avoid over-crowding.
4. Wash the leaves of your plants several times a year.  Not only is dust unsightly on plants, it clogs the pores of plants leaves and filters sunlight before it reaches the plant.  Dust and grime can also harbor insects. With a soft cloth, wipe the leaves with lukewarm water with a bit of mild dishwashing soap or insecticidal soap added to it


5. Check your plants weekly for insects and disease.  If you didn’t isolate and spray your outdoor plants before introducing them into the house, you may have brought in some insects and disease.  Check the underside of the leaves as this is where most insects gather.  If you are checking your plants on a regular basis, you will catch a lot of the insects before your plant becomes infested.
6. Mealy bug – If your plant is a looking a little bit wilted and losing colour, your plant may have Mealy bug.  Their bodies are up to ¼” long and are covered in a white powdery wax.  They gather on the underneath part of the leaves and at the base of leaf stems.  Mealy bug is one of the hardest insects to rid your plant of.  Isolate your plant and spray it with an insecticidal spray or use a cotton swab with rubbing alcohol and remove them.  You may have to do this a number of times.
7. Aphids are another popular houseplant insect.  They are usually light or dark green, are very tiny, about 1/6th inch long and also cluster on stems and underneath leaves.  They will literally suck the life out of your plant and can also cause premature bud drop.  Use an insecticidal spray to control them, as well.
8. Scale looks like little bumps that collect along stems and at the base of leaves.  They cause a reddening of tissue wherever they feed.  The stems usually lose vigor and die.  They are controlled by using an insecticidal spray.
9. Whitefly – If your leaves are looking a little yellow, dry and dropping, your plant may be infested with Whitefly.  They are about 1/16th inch long and are white in colour.  If they are disturbed, they flutter about the plant. An insecticidal spray provides effective control, as do sticky tapes.
10. Keep your plants away from heat registers, hot or cool drafts and from warm appliances.  High room temperatures make the plant spindly; may cause blooming plants to drop buds or finish blooming prematurely and make them less resistant to insects and disease.









Following is a list of houseplants that are easy to care for and are great plants for a beginner:

1. Cactus (Cactaceae Family) – It loves the sun and seldom needs watering.
2. Dragon Tree – (Dracaena marginata) – It loves a bright location and good drainage.  (Don’t let its feet stand in water.)
3. Heartleaf Philodendron – (Philodendron scandens) – The Sweetheart is the most popular of the Philodendrons as it remains fairly small and drought tolerant.
4. Jade Plant (Crassula ovata) – This is a succulent foliage plant that’s happy in indirect sun and little water.
5. Mother-in-Laws Tongue or Snake Plant- (Sansevieria) – This plant has beautiful sword-shaped leaves, thrives in full sun or part shade, prefers dry air and soil and rarely needs repotting.
6. Ponytail Palm – (Beaucarnea recurvata) – This plant, which is often mistaken for a Palm, is actually a succulent.  It stores water in its swollen base so the occasional lack of water will do no harm.
7. Pothos or Devil’s Ivy – (Epipremnum aureum) – This plant is well known for its long, trailing stems that can grow to 8 feet or more.  If you forget to water every once in awhile, it is very forgiving; however, it doesn’t like to be waterlogged.  Cut it back a few times a year to make it bushy.
8. Spider Plant – Chlorophytum comosum) – This is a very dependable plant.  The stems produce little white flowers and are soon weighted down with little plantlets.  It prefers bright, indirect light.
9. Wandering Jew – (Zebrina pendula) – This is a beautiful plant with purple and green leaves and is a great one to add to your outdoor containers. It likes moist soil.  Pinch it often to keep it from getting leggy.
10. ZZ Plant – (Zamioculclas zamiifolia) – This is an easy going houseplant that thrives on neglect.  It tolerates low light, rarely needs fertilizing and is very forgiving if you forget to water.



Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:10 AM 0 Comments