Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Miniature Gardening

 The desire to create a miniature world  is why we have dollhouses, train sets, collections of tiny objects.    
 
So tiny garden worlds, Fairy gardens are making a trend.
 
Deciding on what kind of vessel or where to build this and what plants to use seem to be secondary to the tiny stuff, like tiny patio furniture, trellises, garden tools, and little castles or huts for the fairies to live in.
 
Do you want to create and setup on the ground in the very front corner of the perennial bed, only to realize you may have to weed and cleanup the area regularly.
 
Perhaps build a box, brightly paint it & setup on an old side table, add about 4 -5 inches of potting soil… The fact that the entire set up is about waist high can make the process of designing and planting much easier. 
 
Decorate with at least three plants with very tiny leaves: example a thyme with a reddish cast, a coleus and Irish moss which has tiny white flowers for about three weeks.
 
Adding things like fairies, a solar something and make a beach stone walkway (made from tiny pebbles ), adding a cute little wrought iron bistro set, even a little bridge, a trellis, an acorn mailbox,   tiny terra cotta pots, and maybe wind chime.
 
To save money, repurpose items you find in the house or inexpensive items from the toy or gardening aisles, especially remember to check at your dollar stores.
 
Your little garden will always bring a smile;  Children, especially little girls, are enchanted with the idea but know you can adapt for boys by adding a small dinosaur and some Hot Wheels to the mix.
 
Fairy Gardening is just an off shoot of dish gardens and terrariums. In fact I see the fairy garden trend morphing into terrariums as large as 300 gallon aquariums.

For more information on planting workshops at Jensen's follow these links -

PLANTING WORKSHOP - ALL AGES

KID'S GARDENING - KIDS ONLY

MINIATURE GARDENING, FAIRY GARDENING, GARDENING FOR SENIORS, GARDENING FOR ALL AGES, WORKSHOPS, JENSEN NURSERY, WINNIPEG
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:53 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Happy 150th Canada!!

 

Happy 150th Canada!! 

 

Around my acreage this time of year, .. I see that my  daffodils, tulips  & crocuses have bloomed and now are dyeing back.  While the lilacs,  lupines, peonies, alliums and roses are coming into their own.   The trees and bushes are looking healthy and green, ? but the gardening continues with weeding, applying fertilizer and mulch to help protect and beautify.  

 

Most communities across the country will host organized celebrations for Canada Day, typically outdoor public events, such as parades, carnivals, festivals, barbecues, air and maritime shows, fireworks, and free musical concerts.,

 

Fly your Canadian flag, .. wear your red and white and be humble, kind and thankful; you were born or live now in the most beautiful and safest place in the world.    Celebrate how lucky you are to call Canada home.

 

I ? Canada !! 

 

 

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:33 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Long Weekend Flowers

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 Well, ..we are well under way both inside the greenhouse & outside @ Jensen’s Nursery, you can feel the excitement as many gardeners awaited their initial planting this May long weekend. Remember though it is early to plant annuals and most vegetables outside. There is still a chance of frost. Cold hardy onions, potatoes, and garlic bulbs could go in now for sure. If you a way to cover in case of frost or move containers into garages. Then plant away but watch the weather!
 
Our greenhouse is dazzling with many of our hanging baskets spilling over with colour and gardeners both new and old have been filling their shopping boxes with favourite plants.  A simple rule for planting pots is to have 3 different types of plants; the thriller being the focal or tallest plant in the container, the fillers should be of complimentary colours and shorter than the thriller, and last but not least, the spiller to add the dramatic draping of colour to your container.
 
The outside area has display tables of rows of perennials that will continue to change as they grow til  blooming and many display areas of shrubs and trees that are just now waking up as they fully leaf out.
 
Whether you have a shade spot or a sunny spot we have some great suggestions to help build your containers, gardens and landscaping.
Gardening can be a very rewarding activity. With a little time and effort, you can watch your creativity blossom and your ideal outdoor space flower.
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greenhouse, flowers, hanging baskets, coleus, basket stuffers, winnipegs best greenhouse
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:59 PM 0 Comments

Monday, September 12, 2016

FREE FALL SEMINARS - REGISTER NOW!

2016 FALL FIESTA DAY -SEPTEMBER 17TH

FREE SEMINARS - FREE LUNCH - SPOTS STILL LEFT!

REGISTER AT tammy@jensennursery.com or call (204)488-5042

SPECIAL DEALS ALL DAY - FREE DRAWS

9:15 - 10:30 Fall Yard Care - Grant Dunn  BOOKED - STANDING ROOM ONLY
(10:00 - 10:30) Q & A Grant Dunn and Susan Jensen Stubbe

Do you have an unsightly lawn, bugs in your shrubs, mildew or spots on your leaves, caterpillars eating your trees, deer or rabbits in your garden, or one of many other gardening problems? Grant has a solution for all your gardening woes!! Get your yard looking good and ready for the long winter ahead!! We will have a quick break at 10 and then Susan will join Grant for a question/answer session! Write down all your questions and come prepared!

11:00 Ready, Split, Go! Splitting perennials - Susan Jensen Stubbe - BOOKED STANDING ROOM ONLY
Are your perennials looking a bit overgrown with all the rain this year? Maybe it is time to split them this fall. We will do a live demonstration on how to split a perennial! Can my perennial be split? Does it prefer the spring or the fall? How can I help my newly split perennials thrive? Is there more than one way to split a perennial? Sue will give you the answers to all these questions and more!

12:00 - 12:45 FREE LUNCH

12:45 - 1:45 Pruning Shrubs & Small Trees - Susan Jensen Stubbe - LIMITED SPOTS LEFT
With all the rain this year your shrubs and trees may need a pruning. You may not be able to get out and prune that 40' high tree in your yard, but shrubs and smaller trees can easily be done! Susan will demonstrate how to prune roses, shrubs & smaller manageable trees! Which shrubs should be pruned in the fall? How much should I prune? Which hydrangeas need pruning? How do I care for a shrub or tree after I prune? Sue will answer these and other questions you may have.

2:00 - 3:00 
Bill Dowie, BA, MCPM, LEED-AP O+M B  - LIMITED SPOTS LEFT
Botanically Speaking Getting to know the food we eat everyday

Bill is a green building accredited professional, and is a certified permaculture designer, and master gardener. He is a former Instructor in Prairie Horticulture, and still coaches homeowners as an independent Ecological Landscaper. 

Food is a wondrous life-giving thing. However, you may be surprised about how many parts of a plant we humans are actual consuming. You will see a short pictorial lecture on leaves, tubers, roots, stems, flowers, fruit, seeds, and more - all botanically related back to what we are actually eating on our dinner plate.

3:15 - 4:15 Colleen Zacharias Fall Bulb Planting & Master Gardener LIMITED SPOTS LEFT
Plant bulbs now for a beautiful spring display. Colleen Zacharias, Winnipeg Free Press Homes gardening columnist will talk about varieties to consider and how-to tips. Ever dream of becoming a Master Gardener? Colleen will also be discussing the Master Gardener Program Orientation Night which is coming up on September 27, 2016.


Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:12 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Rain, Rain Go Away!

 Rain, Rain Go Away
By Susan Jensen Stubbe
There is something great about the fresh smell in the air after a good rain. The birds seem to chirp louder, the animals frolic about and the trees, shrubs and plants seem to stand at attention and glow with lush new growth. But then it keeps raining two or three times a week, never really drying out in between rains. Our established trees and shrubs still look ok but our newly planted trees are starting to turn yellow and the leaves are wilting. How can the leaves actually be wilting with all this water. The reason they are wilting is the excess water is actually damaging the roots systems. The plant’s roots need oxygen to be healthy and grow. As the water fills the pores in the soil it pushes the oxygen out. If the plant’s roots cannot get the required amount of oxygen they start dying causing the leaves to wilt and turn yellow. The plants do not have to be surrounded by standing water for this root damage to occur they just need to have continuous wetness.
Once these roots are damaged the plant can’t take up the require moisture and nutrients and it will stop growing or if the damage is extensive they will eventually died.
To help your plants thru the stressful time you should lightly aerated the soil around the drip line with a garden fork. You want to loosen the soil but not break the roots.
Make sure you are not adding water when it is not needed. A newly planted tree needs moisture but it also need to slightly dry between watering. I like to do what I call a squeeze test to see if the soil requires moisture. To do this you collect a handful of soil from the base of the plant and squeeze it in your hand. If the soil holds the shape of your hand and does not crumble easily then there is enough moisture present. If the soil crumbles easily then the tree required moisture.
Generally trees require approximately 5 gallons of water per inch to trunk per week. This water should be applied at a slow rate so it does not run off. For a newly planted tree or shrub apply this water on top of the root ball as well as to the soil surrounding the edge of the root ball. This will encourage the tree to expand its roots.
Planting a tree to deep can also cause the roots to die from lack of oxygen. A plant should be planted so that the root ball is level with the surrounding grade or slightly higher.
excessive rainfall and plants, overwatering trees, jensen nursery



DogwoodDo


Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:51 AM 0 Comments

Friday, June 17, 2016

Canada's Garden Days! June 17- 19th, 2016

 http://login.greatbignews.com/UserFiles/303/GardenDays.htm
It's Canada's Garden Days this weekend!
Our special deals for this event start today!!


All 1 gallon size perennials are $1 OFF.
3 1/2" perennials & annuals regular price $4.39 each – 10/$38. 
All Gardening Giftware is on sale 25% OFF! 
Includes great Father's Day ideas - inukshuks, birdfeeders, birdhouses, unique garden animals, miniature supplies, empty containers, wall art, garden gnomes, empty containers and more!
Lot's of great teacher gift ideas at 25% OFF!
15% all Prairie Garden Books
15% OFF Made in Manitoba Skin & Body care!
10% OFF Coal and Canary Made in Manitoba Candles! 
50% OFF Flower bulbs and onion sets
roses, winnipeg, jensen nursery
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 11:08 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Jennifer's Home Garden Consultations

 A Personal Stylist?

Why would you hire a personal stylist for clothing or home decor?  Probably to save time and money?  Expertise?  Booking a Home Garden consultation with Jensen Nursery is like having a personal stylist for your yard.

We will come to your home for an hour (or two) to have a look at your garden spaces and plants.  Consideration will be given to sunand soil conditions and your personal preferences for plant type or leaf and bloom colour.  You can ask questions about plant problems like insects, diseases, pruning and overall health.  We have many favourite plants and would be happy to share them with you.  

Sometimes you have to clean out your closet and sometimes your garden as well.  Some plants would prefer a sunnier or shadier location.  Or some plants just need to be removed altogether.

We know all about the newest plants in the market and can suggest which ones you might like to try in your garden.  Sometimes we have already tried them at home.  

Just like a personal stylist we want to help your garden look its best!

Check out this link for details: HOME CONSULTATION SERVICE


Jennifer
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:48 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Gardening Saturday 2016

The first sign of spring in Winnipeg is Gardening Saturday! It is a bit early this year but so is spring! 

The ninth annual Gardening Saturday will be held at the Victoria Inn Hotel and Conference Centre on Saturday, March 19, 2016  from 9am – 3pm.  Join gardeners of all knowledge levels and skills, explore the tradeshow floor featuring a variety of leaders in the home and garden industry, and learn from your fellow enthusiasts! 
gardening saturday 2016, garden show, home and garden show


What’s in store for 2016?
Keynote Speaker Zachary Weiss
Trade Show featuring various home and garden vendors
Food Market featuring fresh and local fare
Fun, hands on activities in our new Hobby Lobby
Over 15 Workshops & Educational Sessions

We will be at booth #801 which is the second booth as you walk in the main entrance.
We will have an assortment of spring bulbs, succulents, herbs, heritage seeds and garden decor!
Pick up our 2016 Shrub & Tree Catalogue and our 2016 Perennial Catalogue. The first 1000 people in the doors will receive a FREE TOTE bag with lots of goodies in it. If you do not get a tote bag drop our booth and we will give you the special coupon that we put in the tote bag. 
We look forward to seeing you!

Here are some links for more information - 
2016 SPRING BULBS
KEYNOTE SPEAKER
WORKSHOP INFORMATION & REGISTRATION
HOBBY LOBBY - FREE DEMONSTRATIONS
VENDORS

Jensen Nursery and Garden Centre
Booth 801 - Main aisle - second booth on the right hand side
Saturday March 19th - 9 am - 3 pm
Victoria Inn and Conference Centre - 1808 Wellington Ave Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 4:07 PM 0 Comments

Friday, January 22, 2016

Val's Christmas Tree in January! Bird Haven!

 Happy New Year!
Here’s a picture of what I did with my Jensens christmas tree ( a 6 foot premium frasier this
year) ­ yes I know ­ not exactly as enviromentally friendly as turning it into mulch ­ but so very
much more entertaining!
I decorated it with pine cones dipped in peanut butter then rolled in black oil seeds, unshelled
peanuts, and some leftover baked goods .The sparrows also enjoy leftover porridge as well
especially if it has cranberries in it­ which I also included .
My visitors include many different species of sparrows, chickadees and bluejays
I have not seen the woodpecker on there but I know he is around!
christmas tree, bird feeders, feed the birds, jensen nursery
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 11:35 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, December 17, 2015

1 Week of Christmas!

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Wow....Snow!

All of our gardens will be much happier with their new cozy white blanket.

We have had a very busy holiday season this year, and we would like to extend our thanks to all our customers. Without your support we would not be a successful local business. We try to alwalys give friendly, helpful advice and the very best service all year long!

Thank you and see you in the Spring!

And to all a good night,
Jennifer

ps...last day open in Monday December 21st!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 3:36 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, December 10, 2015

2 Weeks of Christmas!

fresh centerpiece, jensen nursery
Christmas is coming fast this year, and as I write this I see some snow outside. Finally…all our gardens need it!
 
Come in soon to pick out your Christmas tree if you haven’t already. Our stock is getting low Remember our free delivery.
 
AND…
 
Every year we have donated to Pennies from Heaven. For every Christmas tree we sell we give $2 and for every poinsettia we give $1. It is now called “Miracle on Mountain” because we don’t have pennies anymore. The money raised helps the Christmas Cheer Board.
 
AND…
 
We are collecting food for Winnipeg Harvest. The bins are right at our front door. They have told us that they especially need baby formula. 
 
We are here until December 21 st. We have fresh wreaths, Christmas trees, poinsettias and giftware. We can make a custom centrepiece for your holiday table as well.
 
Glaedelig Jul,
Jennifer
outdoor christmas container, fresh greens, christmas decor, winnipeg, jensen nursery
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:47 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, December 02, 2015

3 Weeks of Christmas!

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I love Christmas! We are very busy and there is lots to do. And we have Cookies! north pole, christmas shop, christmas tree shop, swags, wreaths, fresh greens, jensen nursery
It was nice to see some of our “regular” customers and great to see some newcustomers this past weekend.  
 
We have delivered quite a few Christmas trees already, so I thought it was time to give you some specific care instructions to keep your tree beautiful throughout the season.
 
If we have done a fresh cut at the bottom of your tree, it is important to get that tree into water within an hour. If we have just dropped your tree off at our house, you will need to get a saw and take an inch off the bottom of your tree. This allows the tree to draw up water from the stand, just like a fresh bouquet of flowers. In the first days, your tree will drink a lot of water, so you have to check a couple of times a day to replenish the water in the stand. This water intake will slow down so that you will only have to add water every day or two. Please think about closing hot air vents that are near the tree. This will help. We don’t recommend anything but plain water. No sugar, 7 up etc. The most important idea here is that you don’t let that fresh cut be above the water line. 
 
If you haven’t received your tree yet, this might be a good time to consider a new stand. We have some in the greenhouse, that are extremely easy to use and hold a lot of WATER!!!
 
We have another open house this weekend, so stop by and grab a Poinsettia, or a cup of Glog!!! And I am making some more Fresh wreaths.
 
 
Joyeux Noel,
Jenniferchristmas trees, free christmas tree delivery,  christmas trees, winnipeg
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:18 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, November 26, 2015

4 Weeks of Christmas

 winter wonderland, christmas trees, greens, christmas shop, winnpeg

And we're off! We have already delivered our first Christmas tree, had our first craft class, sold the first Poinsettia, and wished our first :Happy Holidays! We can't wait to see our "regular" customers and we would like to welcome new ones.

Come to our first open house this weekend - where you can pick your Christmas tree, buy a fresh wreath, order an outdoor container and have some refreshments. Our "WInter Wonderland" is ready!

Please check out the links below for more information.

Merry Christmas,
Jennifer

 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 5:44 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Red Lily Beetle

 
 
Lily Beetle
 
It’s amazing how Mother Nature can contain such beautiful but destructive things. Take the Red Lily Beetle for example. This bright red beetle that some would admire for its beauty but in a matter of a few days it can eat a garden full of lily leaves. It is now on Gardener’s most watched list. The beetle will feed on the leaves of the lily in the larvae stage as well as in the adult stages.
 
Life Cycle
 
The adults emerge from the ground in late April or early May and lay their eggs on the underside of the newly emerging leaves of the lily. These eggs will hatch into larva in 7-10 days and will feed for 16-24 days. These larva cover themselves in their own feces to discourage predators. Once the larva’s feeding stage is over they will drop to the soil and encase themselves in a cocoon for 2 to 3 weeks. Then they will emerge in adult form and crawl up the lily and continue feeding. As adults they fly, infecting new stands of lilies with each cycle. In late September or early October they will go into the ground to over winter. The beetle can have two or more cycles per season and can lay up to 450 eggs per season.
 
Identification
 
The adult beetle is easy to id by it’s bright red body and black legs, head and antenna. The eggs are reddish orange or light brown in color and are laid on the underside of the leaves in irregular rows. The larva are light brown covered with a black goo (their own feces) making them look like black blobs on the leaves.
 
Biological Control
 
The best time to start controlling the beetle is first thing in spring when they are mating. Handpick them from the leaves and squish them before they get a chance to lay their eggs. It’s a good idea to place a white cloth around the bottom of the lily to catch any that get away. They tend to drop as a defense mechanism when disturbed.
 
Because they beetle can have more than one cycle it is important to check the plants throughout the spring, summer and fall months.
 
Chemical Controls
 
For an infestation that is out of control a chemical intervention may be necessary. There are a number of products that we carry that will help control the adults and the larva. Using products containing pyrethrum or permethrin will kill the lily beetle. Pyrethrum is a natural chemical that is produced from certain chrysanthemum flowers. It breaks down quite quickly thus it is considered to have a low toxicity. Permethrin is a man made insecticide whose chemistry is based on the natural pyrethrum. The synthetic version is more stable in sunlight thus it will last a little longer in the environment. You will get good control with the Pyrethrum and better control with the permethrin. Both can be harmful to beneficial insects such as lady beetles or bees. Thus they should be applied directly to the insects or infected plants.
 
What we stock...
 
Pyrethum Based
 
Eco Sense Bug –b-Gone
 
Safer’s End All
 
Permethrin Based
 
Ambush
 
Dr. Doom
 
Please see our staff for Application Rates
 
Susan Jensen Stubbe
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:39 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Got Critters? Protecting your yard from deer, rabbits, squirrels and more!

 Deer and rabbits can eat your destroy your garden, flower gardens, shrubs and trees. Our warranty does not cover animal damage. Protect your plants if you have rabbits or deers in your yard. We have an assortment of products available to help protect your yard. 

Squirrels and chipmunks steal bird seed. Squirrels chew through materials like siding and woods to access shelter, while chipmunks dig burrows and can damage building foundations.

CRITTER RIDDER - Repels Raccoons, Skunks, Dogs, Cats, Squirrels, Groundhogs and Chipmunks
 
Critter Ridder® is a patented blend of ingredients derived from hot peppers that immediately irritates an animal’s senses of smell, taste and touch upon encounter. This overwhelming irritation sensation repels critters, and after a couple of unwelcome visits, they learn to stay away from your yard
 
• OMRI listed and USDA approved for use in organic gardening
•Won't damage soil or vegetation
•Lasts up to 30 days 

Critter Ridder® RTU (ready-to-use) liquid is perfect for multi-surface application. An ideal animal repellent, this can be used to prevent cats, dogs, raccoons, squirrels, groundhogs and skunks digging in your lawn, garden, or landscaped areas. 
It also helps keep animals from damaging ornamental/landscape planting and discourages squirrels from bird feeders. (When using on bird feeders especially wooden feeders, test-spray in an inconspicuous area to avoid staining.) The formula can reduce the frequent tearing of garbage bags by dogs, cats, squirrels and raccoons.

Critter Ridder Granual
Sprinkle granules on the ground around perimeters or across entry ways to deter animals from accessing protected areas. Use Critter Ridder® granules to keep animals out of gardens and flower beds and out from underneath porches and sheds. 
 
Squirrels - 
To repel a squirrel, a repellent with a mode of action that works via irritation or is a taste-based repellent is best. Additionally, because squirrels are so tenacious, it is strongly recommended to use both liquid and granular repellents to make your yard as uninviting as possible.
Spray CRITTER RIDDER onto surfaces like bird feeders, bulbs, and trees to keep squirrels off and prevent gnawing.
Sprinkle granular CRITTER RIDDER around the perimeter of structures, plants and gardens to prevent entry.
 
 

PLANTSKYDD          Repels Deer, Rabbit, Squireels, Chipmunks and Voles

Plantskydd® Repellents are considered the most cost-effective, and environmentally safe, animal repellents available. An odor based animal repellent made from porcine hemoglobin, vegetable oil and water.

EFFECTIVE against: deer, rabbits, voles, chipmunks & squirrels
•Safe for people, pets and the environment
•RAIN-RESISTANT—no need to re-apply after every rainfall. 
•SAFE for use in vegetable gardens, on fruit trees and food crops. (Do not apply to edibles within 1 month of harvest)
•ORGANIC—first animal repellent OMRI Listed by the Organic Materials Review Institute for food production.
•BONUS—built in fertilizer results in bigger, healthier plants!
What makes it so effective??
 
Plantskydd works by emitting an odor that animals associate with predator activity. It also stimulates a fear-based response which results in animals looking elsewhere to dine. Animals with avoid plants before they bite not after!
 
 
Applications
•For best protection, treat plants before browse begins, in spring or fall.
•Plantskydd liquid formulation lasts 3- 4 months during the active
growing season. APPLY MORE OFTEN DURING GROWING SEASON
•IMPORTANT—spray on dry plants—allow to dry for 24 hours.
•Ideally, spray in the morning or late afternoon, when the sun is not as strong. 
•Spray a fine mist directly onto plant material 
•Reddish-brown color dissipates within 48-72 hours 
•Apply when temperatures are above freezing
•Apply to dry plants and allow 24 hours to dry 
 
BOBBEX - click here for website -
repels Deer and Rabbits
Bobbex is a all natural safe product made with dried eggs, other proteins, fish meal, fish oil, meat meal, garlic and castor oils. It is safe on plants and has been proven effective to repel deer from shrubs, trees and ornamentals. Not recommended for use on edibles.
•Environmentally-safe
•Harmless to wildlife including aquatic species
•Harmless to humans and pets
•Contain no petrochemical or synthetic components
•Made from all-natural and recycled ingredients
•Will not wash off will last through several heavy rains
•Works by smell and taste aversion
•Will last through several heavy rains
•Dries clear with slight odor that will dissipate after 24 hours 
Applications - allow 6 hours to dry before rain or watering
Spray when temperature outside is between 2 degrees and 30 degrees During Spring & Summer growing season spray every 10-14 days 
During Fall & Winter spray monthly
For more information on applications - click on this link
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 1:48 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

It's time to apply your Dormant Oil!

Dormant Oil Kits contain Horticultural Oil and Lime Sulphur that are combined and sprayed on most Deciduous Trees and Shrubs.  These oils help clean up any overwintering eggs or fungi on your trees and shrubs. It is an excellent and environmentally friendly way to get ahead of insect and disease problems on your Fruit trees, Ornamental Trees, Cranberry, Roses, Dogwoods and many other trees and shrubs.
It's time to apply your Dormant Oil !  Dormant Oil Kits contain Horticultural Oil and Lime Sulphur that are combined and sprayed on most Deciduous Trees and Shrubs.  These oils help clean up any overwintering eggs or fungi on your trees and shrubs. It is an excellent and environmentally friendly way to get ahead of insect and disease problems on your Fruit trees, Ornamental Trees, Cranberry, Roses, Dogwoods and many other trees and shrubs.  Dormant Oil must be sprayed before the leaves emerge and when the buds are just beginning to swell.  Spray in early morning to allow sufficient time to dry before nightfall.  You want to pick a day that there is no rain in the forecast and the temperature will stay above 4°C.   Dormant Oils will help control scale insects, mites(maple gall Mites), aphids, apple scab, powdery mildew, and anthracnose.  It is an excellent general clean up for any garden. gall mite on maple, disease, dormant oil, jenesn nurseryoyster shell scale, dormant oil, jensen nursery
                    Black spot on roses                                                  Gall mite on Maple tree                                         oyster shell scale
 
Dormant Oil must be sprayed before the leaves emerge and when the buds are just beginning to swell.  Spray in early morning to allow sufficient time to dry before nightfall.  You want to pick a day that there is no rain in the forecast and the temperature will stay above 4°C. 
 
Dormant Oils will help control scale insects, mites(maple gall Mites), aphids, apple scab, powdery mildew, and anthracnose.  It is an excellent general clean up for any garden.

dormant oit kit, disease plants, dormant oil, horticulture oil, jensen nursery
                    Powdery mildew                                                 Dormant Oil Spray Kit
 
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:45 AM 0 Comments

Monday, March 24, 2014

Gardening Saturday at CMU Saturday March 29th, 2014

It's time for Gardening Saturday again! Jensen Nursery will be there with a huge selection of spring bulbs available at special show pricing. We will also have Mumm's Sprouting seeds, Organique products, and a selection of 2014 Garden Giftware items at sale prices. Drop by and talk to us about our Landscape Design and Garden Consultation Service. We will also be handing out coupons that can be redeemed at our garden centre at 2550 McGillivray Blvd. 
 
                                                               7th Annual
                                             Gardening Saturday 2014
                                             Tradeshow & Educational Symposium
                                     March 29th, 2014       9:00am -4:00pm
                                 
                                                                
          Demonstrations    Workshops      Tradeshow      Food Market 
 
               $7.00 General Admission includes Tradeshow Area & Food Market
                                   
Gardening Saturday takes place between 9:00am – 4:00pm at Canadian Mennonite
University North Campus,  500 Shaftesbury Blvd.
         
Join us! With more than 80+ exhibitors,  demonstrations, hands-on workshops and a
delectable food market, this one day event is sure to please everyone. Gardening Saturday
2013 attracted  2200 gardening enthusiasts.
         
 

gardening saturday, winnipeg gardening show, jensen nursery, bulbs for sale


 

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 1:26 PM 0 Comments

Friday, November 22, 2013

Join us this Saturday and Sunday for our Christmas Open House!

  You’re invited to our......

CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE

November 23rd & 24th           November 30th & December 1st           December 7th & 8th  

Come and see Santa on Sunday Dec 1st & 8th

·        Christmas trees – many varieties & sizes

·        High quality tree stands

·        We support “PENNIES FROM HEAVEN” we donate for all trees & wreaths sold!

·        Bring a “Tin for the Bin” “MANITOBA HARVEST”

·        Fresh Wreaths,, Centerpieces, Outdoor Containers and Garland to decorate your home

·        Evergreen Boughs, Branches, Holly and Speciality Christmas Greens

·        Christmas Craft Supplies at great prices!

·        Unique Giftware for all seasons

·        Gifts for the Gardener, or Bird Lover in your house

·        Christmas Decor

·        Unique Garden Gifts and Metal Wall Art

·        Fresh Honey

 

Shop indoors with a hot drink and stay warm!

Free Christmas Tree Delivery to your door in Winnipeg!

Christmas Hours

Mon & Tuesday 10-6      Wed-Fri 10-8      Sat 9-5       Sun 11-5

 

                      Jensen Nursery & Landscaping Ltd

2550 McGillivray Blvd (at Brady Rd)     (204)488-5042

                                     Jensennursery.com

 

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:02 PM 0 Comments

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Gardening Saturday 2013

Download Attachment...
It's Gardening Saturday time again!! We will be there with a large triple booth this year. We will have a complete Organic line with us as well as a huge selection of spring bulbs! We look forward to seeing you all there. If you are one of the first 800 in the door you will get a gift bag! ( I am putting a coupon for $10 free plants in ther- which more than cover your admission cost!)
Here is a little information I received on the event I thought I would pass on.......

Did you know that Gardening Saturday is Manitoba's largest gardening symposium and trade show? To date, Gardening Saturday 2012 was our most successful event with an estimated 2000 gardening enthusiasts who attended the trade show area and hundreds more who participated in the workshops.

 

Now it's time for Gardening Saturday 2013 on March 23rd from 9:00am - 4:00pm at the Canadian Mennonite University and we look forward to seeing you.

 

Be the first to get the latest gardening trends for 2013! Visit over 70 garden related displays and meet with horticultural related businesses, professionals and information booths. We will have a bustling food market, floral displays and educational demonstrations.



Do your garden projects include a water feature this year? Or a new retaining wall? Would you like to learn more about composting, vines, vegetable gardening, preserving or container gardening? Register for one of the 15 information packed workshops presented by local gardening experts.



One of the many highlights for Gardening Saturday 2013 will be Keynote Speaker Beckie Fox, Editor-in-chief for Garden Making magazine who will present on Container Gardening. We are also pleased to announce that our special guest speaker will be Sara Williams, noted author and Prairie Horticulturalist. Featured topic: Low Maintenance Gardening. 



For further information, please visit our Gardens Manitoba website www.gardensmanitoba.com. Registration form will be posted to the workshop page soon. Payment can be made via online (available end of January), mail-in (see address below) or phone (204-895-4560). Visa and Mastercard accepted.

Early bird registrants will receive a tote bag, compliments of Ball Hort, filled with goodies: catalogues, handy information guides, discount offers to your favourite garden centres, and more!



Presented by the Friends of Gardens Manitoba



Got questions? Contact Richard Baschak,

Executive Director Friends of Gardens Manitoba at:

Richard.Baschak@gardensmanitoba.com





CULTIVATING OUR GARDENING COMMUNITY
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 11:21 AM 0 Comments

Friday, January 18, 2013

My Seeds Are Sprouting – What Do I Do Now??????

I hope you have had some success in getting your seeds to sprout!
Once the seeds have sprouted, remove the cover.  When the seedlings are young, you may want to re-cover them for a few hours a day to keep them from drying out.
Over many years of growing my own plants, one thing that really helped me out was using a turkey baster to water the young seedlings.  I found I had better control over the amount of water I gave them, as opposed to using a watering can.  I often would use a spray bottle filled with water, however, in many instances, the young seedlings would be bowled over with the spray.  Always use warm water, NOT cool.
This is also the time to start fertilizing.  Use a water soluble fertilizer such as a 10-52-10. Add fertilizer to tepid water, as directed, and fertilize about every third watering.  A high middle number (phosphorous) will encourage a good root system; a high first number (nitrogen) will encourage too much leaf growth and the third number (potassium) will allow for better uptake of food and water from the soil and is good for the over-all health of the plant.  At this point, don’t over-fertilize and don’t over-water. 
Put the seedlings as close to your light source as possible to prevent the seedlings from “stretching”.  If you are using Fluorescent lights, keep your lights on for about 15 – 16 hours a day.  If you have them in a sunny spot in the house, make sure they don’t dry out from the heat of the sun.  You will also have to turn them every few days to encourage the stems to grow straight and prevent stretching.
Once the seedlings appear to be over-crowded, or have developed their second set of leaves, it is time to separate them and transplant them into little containers of their own, (about 1 ½” – 2”) large. Pick the plants up by the leaves, not the stem or roots when you are transplanting.  Make sure the containers you are using have holes for good drainage.  Peat pots are excellent ones to use as they allow the water to pass through and you won’t have to remove your plant when planting out into the soil as the peat pot will break down in the moist soil.  If you transplant seedlings into a container that is too large, you won’t see much new top-growth, however, the plant will be busy growing roots to fill the container.  At this point, you may want to switch to an all-purpose fertilizer (20-20-20).  I like using a very weak strength of fertilizer with every watering.
Almost all seedlings will grow into better, bushier plants if you pinch off their top growth after they’ve grown their second or third set of leaves.  Never pinch tuberous begonia or celosia.  As the seedlings grow, you may want to transplant them again into a container that is a little larger. You may also want to add some soil to your soil-less mix to train the roots to work their way through soil.  They will have a better time once they are finally planted into the garden.  You will then have some healthy, large plants to transplant outside once the weather warms (usually around May 24th).
As your seedlings grow, use a fan on them for a few hours a day to stress them a little.  Also, allow them to dry out a bit by missing a watering and a fertilizing once a week and put them in a cool spot at night. Your plants will be a lot stronger and more able to survive better on their own outside. 
Always harden off your plants before planting them outside by gradually getting them used to the conditions in which they are going to grow.  A plant that has been pampered with a lot of water, fertilizer heat and humidity will grow lush, green, tender foliage but will be the first to go into shock and keel over in our Manitoba sun and wind.  Always put your tender plants into a shady, sheltered spot for the first couple of days and then gradually introduce them out into the wind and sun. If your plants become withered or start showing signs of too much sun (white leaves), give them a good watering and put them back into the sheltered shade.  Your plants will soon become used to the conditions and be less likely to succumb to the harsh conditions of the outside.  A good rule to follow when planting is to plant your sun plants out first and then your shade plants.  Usually the shade plants are more tender and planting out too early (impatiens or begonia) will set them back or you may lose them if the nights dip down to below 10 degrees.
Many plants such as petunias, verbena, alyssum, dianthus, foxglove (foxy), snapdragons, gazanias, centaurea (batchelor button), rudbeckia (gloriosa daisy), sweet peas, chrysanthemum, cosmos and pansies can take a little cold and frost, but, be prepared to cover them if the risk of frost occurs soon after planting out.  Use newspaper, cardboard or sheets to cover.  Never use plastic as this draws the cold.
About a week after your plants have been planted outside, give them a good fertilizing (like a Miracle Gro 15-30-15 for all your blooming plants and an all-purpost 20-20-20) for all your leafy plants.  Continue to do so, according to directions, throughout the summer and you will have strong, healthy plants right through the season. 
Stay tuned for some more planting tips and tricks!
Arlene Wheeler
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Monday, December 03, 2012

Christmas Urns with Fresh Evergreen Boughs!

Big Urn, Little Urn, Urn with lot's of Bling,
Urn with natural pinecones!
If you can vision it we can build it!
Christmas Outdoor Containers to make your neighbours jealous!!!!

All of our crafts supplies are here for you to choose your custom design. Come by today and order a beautiful outdoor container custom made to your taste! You can pick out pinecones, branches, berries, wheat , or one of our many christmas picks! Or buy the  boughs and craft supplies and take them home to make it yourself! We are here to make your home beautiful for Christmas inside and out!
evergreen urns, outdoor decoratinve containers, jensen Nursery
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 2:00 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Arlene’s Houseplant Tips



Now that you have put your garden to sleep, it’s time to enjoy some indoor gardening.  With our efforts concentrated on our outdoor gardens in summer, most of us tend to neglect our houseplants.
Indoor plants can provide us with colour during the drab days of winter and also do a great job of cleaning our air.  Larger plants soften and blend with groups of furniture, while smaller plants enhance and adorn our tables and windowsills. Knowing your plant’s requirements and paying close attention to your plants will substitute for a “Green Thumb”.  Most foliage plants are native to tropical areas and enjoy a humid atmosphere with indirect light. If your plant does not receive enough light, it will soon let you know with yellowing leaves that will soon die.  A great way to increase humidity is to group your plants together or set them on trays filled with pebbles and water.  Avoid spraying your plants to increase humidity as this is only an invitation to insects and disease. 
Plants will sense the natural shortening of daylight hours and may go into dormancy as they would in their natural habitat. This is a period of inactivity where the plant remains alive but doesn’t grow.  This is a time when the amount of water and light should be decreased.  Most of our indoor plants die off because we water them too much.  Water only when the soil becomes dry to the touch about an inch below the surface.  Never allow the plant to sit in water as this will promote root rot.

Following are some of my houseplant tips.

1. Cut back on feeding houseplants.  This is the time of year the plants need a rest.  The best time to fertilize houseplants is from late January until the beginning of October.
2. Now is NOT the time to re-pot houseplants unless they are root-bound, that is, if the roots of your plant are coming through the drain holes; or if your plant has definitely outgrown its container, otherwise, the best time is in the spring.
3. Healthy houseplants require good air circulation, so it’s important to avoid over-crowding.
4. Wash the leaves of your plants several times a year.  Not only is dust unsightly on plants, it clogs the pores of plants leaves and filters sunlight before it reaches the plant.  Dust and grime can also harbor insects. With a soft cloth, wipe the leaves with lukewarm water with a bit of mild dishwashing soap or insecticidal soap added to it


5. Check your plants weekly for insects and disease.  If you didn’t isolate and spray your outdoor plants before introducing them into the house, you may have brought in some insects and disease.  Check the underside of the leaves as this is where most insects gather.  If you are checking your plants on a regular basis, you will catch a lot of the insects before your plant becomes infested.
6. Mealy bug – If your plant is a looking a little bit wilted and losing colour, your plant may have Mealy bug.  Their bodies are up to ¼” long and are covered in a white powdery wax.  They gather on the underneath part of the leaves and at the base of leaf stems.  Mealy bug is one of the hardest insects to rid your plant of.  Isolate your plant and spray it with an insecticidal spray or use a cotton swab with rubbing alcohol and remove them.  You may have to do this a number of times.
7. Aphids are another popular houseplant insect.  They are usually light or dark green, are very tiny, about 1/6th inch long and also cluster on stems and underneath leaves.  They will literally suck the life out of your plant and can also cause premature bud drop.  Use an insecticidal spray to control them, as well.
8. Scale looks like little bumps that collect along stems and at the base of leaves.  They cause a reddening of tissue wherever they feed.  The stems usually lose vigor and die.  They are controlled by using an insecticidal spray.
9. Whitefly – If your leaves are looking a little yellow, dry and dropping, your plant may be infested with Whitefly.  They are about 1/16th inch long and are white in colour.  If they are disturbed, they flutter about the plant. An insecticidal spray provides effective control, as do sticky tapes.
10. Keep your plants away from heat registers, hot or cool drafts and from warm appliances.  High room temperatures make the plant spindly; may cause blooming plants to drop buds or finish blooming prematurely and make them less resistant to insects and disease.









Following is a list of houseplants that are easy to care for and are great plants for a beginner:

1. Cactus (Cactaceae Family) – It loves the sun and seldom needs watering.
2. Dragon Tree – (Dracaena marginata) – It loves a bright location and good drainage.  (Don’t let its feet stand in water.)
3. Heartleaf Philodendron – (Philodendron scandens) – The Sweetheart is the most popular of the Philodendrons as it remains fairly small and drought tolerant.
4. Jade Plant (Crassula ovata) – This is a succulent foliage plant that’s happy in indirect sun and little water.
5. Mother-in-Laws Tongue or Snake Plant- (Sansevieria) – This plant has beautiful sword-shaped leaves, thrives in full sun or part shade, prefers dry air and soil and rarely needs repotting.
6. Ponytail Palm – (Beaucarnea recurvata) – This plant, which is often mistaken for a Palm, is actually a succulent.  It stores water in its swollen base so the occasional lack of water will do no harm.
7. Pothos or Devil’s Ivy – (Epipremnum aureum) – This plant is well known for its long, trailing stems that can grow to 8 feet or more.  If you forget to water every once in awhile, it is very forgiving; however, it doesn’t like to be waterlogged.  Cut it back a few times a year to make it bushy.
8. Spider Plant – Chlorophytum comosum) – This is a very dependable plant.  The stems produce little white flowers and are soon weighted down with little plantlets.  It prefers bright, indirect light.
9. Wandering Jew – (Zebrina pendula) – This is a beautiful plant with purple and green leaves and is a great one to add to your outdoor containers. It likes moist soil.  Pinch it often to keep it from getting leggy.
10. ZZ Plant – (Zamioculclas zamiifolia) – This is an easy going houseplant that thrives on neglect.  It tolerates low light, rarely needs fertilizing and is very forgiving if you forget to water.



Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:10 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

ARLENE’S FALL COMPOSTING TIPS


1. TILL THE ANNUALS IN. MOST ANNUALS THAT HAVE FINISHED FRUITING CAN BE TILLED INTO THE GARDEN. THE LARGER BODIED PLANTS SUCH AS TOMATOES, BROCCOLI AND DAHLIAS CAN BE CHOPPED UP INTO SMALLER PIECES TO MAKE IT EASIER TO COMPOST.

2. LET THE PERENNIALS GET BLACKENED BY FROST & LEAVE IN THE GROUND TO PROVIDE HOMES FOR THE GOOD BUGS LIKE THE LADY BUG OR CUT THE FOLIAGE AND TILL BACK INTO THE GARDEN OR SAVE IN BAGS TO BE ADDED TO YOUR COMPOST PILE.

3. MOW THE LEAVES BACK INTO THE LAWN, USING A MULCHER OR THE HIGHEST SETTING ON YOUR LAWNMOWER.

4. LEAF COMPOSTING  -  LEAVE UNDER TREES & SHRUBS TO COMPOST NATURALLY
- USE ONLY DECIDUOUS LEAVES THAT ARE CHEMICAL FREE & FUNGUS FREE.
- MAKE A LEAF PILE 4’ IN DIAMETER & 3’ HIGH.  INCLUDE A LAYER OF SOIL BETWEEN EVERY FOOT OF LEAVES; MOISTEN BUT NOT SATURATE THE PILE.  PUT A PLASTIC SHEET OVER TOP OF THE PILE TO KEEP IT FROM GETTING WATER-LOGGED.  WEIGHT THE EDGES DOWN WITH ROCKS. THE PILE WILL COMPOST ITSELF IN ABOUT 4 – 6 MONTHS.  THE LEAF COMPOST IS BEST USED AS A SOIL AMMENDMENT RATHER THAN A FERTILIZER AS IT IS LOW IN NUTRIENTS.

5. OAK LEAVES BREAK DOWN SLOWLY AERATING OUR CLAY SOIL, MAKING THE SOIL LIGHTER AND HELPING WITH RETAINING MOISTURE.  SPREAD THE LEAVES OVER THE GARDEN.

6. LEAVES ARE RICH IN CARBON SO ARE EASILY INCORPORATED INTO THE COMPOST BIN.
     -  YOU NEED 2/3 CARBONS (BROWN) - (LEAVES, TWIGS, STRAW, SHRUB PRUNINGS, DRIED GARDEN WASTE) AND 1/3 NITROGEN (GREEN) - (GRASS CLIPPINGS, KITCHEN SCRAPS, FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PEELINGS, COFFEE GROUNDS & OTHER FRESH MATERIALS.
BROWN – ACCELERATES THE COMPOSTING, ELIMINATES ODOUR & HELPS TO PRODUCE A LIGHT, FLUFFY COMPOST.
- DO NOT USE DAIRY OR MEAT!

7. BAG EXTRA LEAVES TO BE USED FOR THE COMPOST PILE IN THE SPRING AND THROUGH THE SUMMER.

8. USE COMPOST ACCELERATOR (WE HAVE AN EXCELLENT COMPOST ACCELERATOR BY ORGUNIQUE THAT WORKS VERY WELL).

9. SAVE WOOD ASH TO SPRINKLE IN THE COMPOST PILE.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:44 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

ARLENE’S FALL GARDENING TIPS ABOUT MULCH

ARLENE’S FALL GARDENING TIPS ABOUT MULCH

APPLY ORGANIC MULCH SUCH AS SHREDDED LEAVES, SHREDDED BARK, FLAX STRAW, COMPOSTED WOOD CHIPS OR COCOA HULLS ABOUT 2 – 4” DEEP AROUND TREES AND SHRUBS AND OVER YOUR PERENNIAL GARDEN.  NEVER PILE UP THE MULCH AROUND THE BASE OF TREES AND SHRUBS. LEAVE ABOUT 8 “ OF SPACE AROUND TREES AND 4 – 6” AROUND SHRUBS.

1. HELPS MAINTAIN MOISTURE

2. HELPS REDUCE GERMINATION & GROWTH OF WEEDS

3. SERVES AS NATURE’S INSULATING BLANKET, KEEPING THE SOIL WARMER IN WINTER & COOLER IN SUMMER

4. REDUCES WINTER INJURY BY MINIMIZING TEMPERATURE VARIATION THAT CAUSES THE CROWN AND ROOTS TO BE EXPOSED

5. IMPROVES SOIL AERATION, STRUCTURE AND DRAINAGE OVER TIME

6. IMPROVES SOIL FERTILITY

7. HELPS INHIBIT CERTAIN PLANT DISEASES

8. REDUCES SOIL EROSION FROM WIND AND WATER

9. IT HELPS IN CATCHING THE SNOW, PROVIDING GREATER INSULATION FOR THE ROOT SYSTEM.

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 3:09 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, October 11, 2012

ARLENE’S TIPS ON FALL ROSE CARE

ARLENE’S TIPS ON FALL ROSE CARE

1. DON’T PRUNE ROSES IN THE FALL IN OUR ZONE – LET THE ROSES
FORM ROSEHIPS AND PREPARE FOR WINTER.
2. FOR HARDY ROSES – YOU REALLY DON’T HAVE TO DO ANYTHING, AS THEY ARE HARDY FOR OUR ZONE AND SHOULD SURVIVE THE WINTER, WITHOUT EXTRA PROTECTION.  
       IF YOU ARE CONCERNED ABOUT A NEWLY PLANTED ROSE, USE
      FLAX STRAW TO COVER IT AFTER THEY IT HAS GONE INTO
      DORMANCY.
3. FOR CLIMBING ROSES – TIE THE CANES WITH SOMETHING SUCH AS
      PANTY HOSE TO KEEP THEM FROM WHIPPING AROUND IN THE
      WIND.
4.  FOR TEA ROSES
a. THESE ARE THE ONLY ONES YOU SHOULD PRUNE IN THE FALL OR
    BEND THE CANES AND COVER, IN OUR ZONE.

b. DON’T PRUNE AND COVER, JUST TO GET IT DONE, UNTIL THE 
    COLD WEATHER HAS REALLY SET IN.

c. AFTER PRUNING BACK TO ABOUT 12 INCHES, SPRAY WITH A
    FUNGICIDE/INSECTICIDE OR SPRINKLE WITH GARDEN SULPHUR.

d. COVER THE ROSE WITH 6 – 8 INCHES OF DRY SOIL OR LEAVES.

e. PROTECT IT WITH A ROSE CONE, CARDBOARD BOX OR CONTAINER
   (NOT PLASTIC AS PLASTIC DRAWS THE COLD).  PROTECT IT FROM
    THE SUN, AS SOON AS THE FROST HAS GOT AT IT AND BEFORE IT
    HAS A CHANCE TO THAW OUT.  IT’S THE FREEZING AND THAWING
    THAT DOES THE MOST HARM.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:46 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, October 11, 2012

ARLENE’S TIPS ON OVER-WINTERING CALLA LILIES

ARLENE’S TIPS ON OVER-WINTERING CALLA LILIES

1. CALLA LILIES ARE NOT LILIUM SUCH AS THE ASIATIC LILIES, THEY ARE ZANTEDESCHIA.

2. THEY WILL NOT SURVIVE IN THE GROUND.  THEY MUST BE TAKEN INSIDE OVER THE WINTER.

3. FOR THE COLOURED CALLAS, DIG THEM UP WHEN THE FOLIAGE IS STARTING TO YELLOW.

4. LET THEM DRY FOR A FEW DAYS, REMOVE THE FOLIAGE AND PULL OFF THE DRY ROOTS.

5. STORE THEM IN A CARDBOARD BOX IN A COOL SPOT, AROUND 50 DEGREES.

6. THEY DON’T HAVE TO BE STORED IN SOIL OR PEAT MOSS.  THEY ENJOY A GOOD AIR FLOW TO KEEP THEM DRY.

7. THE WHITE CALLAS - DIG THEM UP, RE-POT THEM AND SPRAY THEM WITH AN INSECTICIDE.

8. GROW THEM ON INDOORS, KEEPING THEM ON THE DRY SIDE.

9. THEY MAY SURPRISE YOU WITH FLOWERS IN FEBRUARY.

10. PLANT THEM OUTSIDE AGAIN THE BEGINNING OF JUNE AFTER THE CHANCE OF FROST.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:11 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, October 04, 2012

ARLENE’S TIPS FOR OVERWINTERING GERANIUMS

THERE ARE A NUMBER OF WAYS TO OVERWINTER YOUR GERANIUMS

METHOD 1 - GROW THEM ON AS HOUSEPLANTS

1. GROW THEM AS HOUSEPLANTS OVER THE WINTER, SUPPLYING THEM WITH SIMILAR CONDITIONS TO WHAT THEY WERE GROWING IN OUTDOORS.
2. DIG THEM UP AND PLACE THEM IN A POT THAT CAN COMFORTABLY FIT THEIR ROOTBALL. PRUNE THEM BACK BY ABOUT 1/3.
3. SPRAY THEM FOR INSECTS AND ISOLATE THEM FOR A FEW WEEKS BEFORE EXPOSING THEM TO YOUR OTHER PLANTS.
4. KEEP THEM AWAY FROM HEAT SOURCES IN THE HOUSE.
5. TRY TO PROVIDE THEM WITH AS MUCH LIGHT AND HUMIDITY AS POSSIBLE AT A TEMPERATURE BETWEEN 60 -70 DEGREES.
6. IN EARLY MARCH, IF THEY HAVE BECOME LEGGY, TRIM THEM BACK BY ABOUT 1/3 TO MAKE THEM BUSH OUT.

METHOD 2 - TAKE CUTTINGS FROM HEALTHY PLANTS THAT HAVE BEEN KEPT RATHER DRY FOR A COUPLE OF WEEKS. (ALTHOUGH TECHNICALLY THIS IS NOT AN OVERWINTERING METHOD)

1. TAKE A CLEAN SHARP KNIFE AND MAKE A CUTTING ABOUT 3 -4 INCHES FROM THE GROWING TIP.
2. TRIM OFF THE LOWER LEAVES AND STICK THE CUTTING INTO VERMICULITE OR A COURSE SANDY MEDIUM, IN SMALL POTS OR FLATS THAT HAVE GOOD DRAINAGE.
3. WATER THEM WELL AND PLACE THE POTS INTO A CLEAR PLASTIC BAG IN A WARM SPOT AWAY FROM DIRECT LIGHT. OPEN THE BAG EVERY FEW DAYS TO ALLOW AIR IN.
4. DON’T LET THEM DRY OUT BUT DON’T OVERWATER THEM SO THEY GET ROOT ROT!
5. IN ABOUT 6 WEEKS AFTER THEY HAVE ROOTED, REPOT THEM INTO SOIL AND MOVE THE NEW PLANTS INTO A WARM SUNNY SPOT.
6. FERTILIZE WITH A WEAKENED SOLUTION OF ALL PURPOSE FERTILIZER EVERY 2 WEEKS.
7. WATER SPARINGLY UNTIL THEY CAN BE PLANTED OUTSIDE AGAIN IN THE SPRING.

METHOD 3 - MAKE THEM GO INTO DORMANCY UNTIL SPRING

1. DIG UP THE PLANT AND GENTLY REMOVE THE SOIL FROM THE ROOTS.
2. THE ROOTS SHOULDN’T BE CLEAN BUT SHOULD BE FREE FROM CLODS OF DIRT.
3. HANG THE PLANTS UPSIDE DOWN IN A SPOT WHERE THE TEMPERATURE IS ABOUT 50 DEGREES.
4. ONCE A MONTH, SOAK THE ROOTS IN WARM WATER FOR ABOUT AN HOUR AND THEN RE-HANG THE PLANT.
5. THE GERANIUM WILL LOSE ALL ITS LEAVES BUT THE STEMS WILL REMAIN ALIVE.
6. IN EARLY MARCH, REPLANT THE STEMS IN SOIL IN POTS AND THEY WILL SPRING TO LIFE.


GERANIUMS ARE ALSO EASILY GROWN FROM SEED!

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:59 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, October 04, 2012

ARLENE’S TIPS FOR DIVIDING PERENNIALS

Most perennials can and should be divided to rejuvenate, maintaining good health and peak bloom.  My favourite time of year is to divide in late fall.  The soil is still warm; the plant gets settled in quickly and comes up in the spring looking refreshed.  Most perennials, when really needing to be divided, tend to die out from the centre or produce smaller leaves and smaller and fewer flowers.  Many times over the years, I have found that I should have really divided the perennial at the end of the season of the year the plant is in its peak form, as, more often than not, the next year it’s starting to split in the centre or there are fewer blooms than the previous year.
Here are some tips when dividing:

1. Water the plant well the day before you intend to divide the plant to put less stress on the plant when you start digging.
2. Dig up the entire plant, starting at the drip line.  If the plant is huge, you may have to slice down the centre of the plant, using a sharp spade.  Then slice the other way down the centre again. The plant will now be in four parts and make it a lot easier to lift it out of the ground.
3. Once the plant has been lifted out of the ground, tangled, fibrous roots can be separated by hand or by using a garden fork, while tough dense roots like a peony will need to be cut apart with a sharp knife or spade.
4. Discard the woody centres of plants and any parts that have soft, rotted roots. Each new division must have two or three new shoots and a good bunch of healthy roots.  You will find a lot of the younger roots and offshoots that grow at the edge of the clump will likely produce stronger, healthier new plants.
5. Before replanting, replenish the area with organic matter to renew the soil.
6. Plant the new divisions as soon as possible otherwise they will soon start to dry out.  If they have dried out while on hold, soak them in a bucket of water for about an hour before replanting.
7. Plant the new plants at the same depth that the old plant was growing.
8. Use a rooting hormone, such as Root Booster or Myke, to get the roots settled quickly and then water the plant well.  Keep the soil moist for several weeks while the new roots are forming.

Plants that should be divided in late summer of early fall:

Asiatic Lily (Lilium) - (Dig deep and replant the bulbs). For an attractive display, plant the bulbs in groups of three on a mound of soil.  Also put sand at the bottom of the hole to provide good drainage.
Bearded Iris – Allow part of the corms to show above ground.  If they are planted too deeply, they may rot or they may not bloom.
*Daylily (Hemerocallis), *Jacob’s Ladder, *Peony (divide infrequently), *Tall Phlox (Phlox paniculata), *Siberian Iris and *Hosta
*Can also be divided in early spring.

Plants to divide in early spring: (Every 1 – 3 years)

Aster Garden Mums
Beardtongue Obedient Plant
Beebalm Painted Daisy
Carnation Shasta Daisy
Common Sundrops Spiderwort
Coralbells Tickseed
Cornflower Yarrow
Delphinium
Fernleaf Bleeding Heart
Foamflower

Plants to divide in early spring: (Every 3 – 5 years)

Astilbe Gooseneck
Bellflower Mallow
Blanketflower Sea Thrift
Catmint Speedwell
Coneflower Daylily (Hemerocallis)
Gay Feather Liatris

Plants to divide in early spring: (Every 5 – 10 years)

Cranesbill Geranium Lungwort
Goatsbeard Meadow Rue
Hosta Meadowsweet
Japanese Anemone Oxeye
Lady’s Mantle Siberian Iris
Plants to divide only to propagate:

Bugbane Yucca
Globeflower

DO NOT DIVIDE THE FOLLOWING PLANTS:

Baby’s Breath (Gypsophila) False Indigo (Baptisia)
Balloon Flower (Platycodon) Flax (Linum)
Bugbane (Cimicifuga) Gentian
Butterfly Weed (Asclepias) Foxgloves (Digitalis)
Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) Lupine
Clematis Monkshood (Aconitum)
Evening Primrose (Oenothera missourienis)
Russian Sage (Perovskia) Sea Hollies (Eryngium spp.)

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:56 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

Arlene's Tips for Over-Wintering Dahlia Tubers

ARLENE’S TIPS FOR OVER-WINTERING DAHLIA TUBERS

1. ALLOW THE DAHLIA TO BE BLACKENED BY FROST.
2. CUT DOWN TO ABOUT 4 INCHES FROM THE GROUND.
3. LIFT THE TUBERS WITH A GARDEN FORK SO AS NOT TO CUT THE TUBER.
4. ALLOW THE TUBERS TO CURE (DRY) A FEW DAYS ON THE GROUND.  MAKE SURE THERE IS NO FROST IN THE FORECAST OR YOUR TUBERS WILL TURN TO MUSH.
5. SHAKE OFF THE MUD AND DUST THE TUBERS WITH GARDEN SULPHUR.
6. YOU CAN DIVIDE THE TUBERS NOW WITH A SHARP KNIFE, ENSURING THERE IS ONE EYE ON THE TUBER OR YOU CAN WAIT UNTIL SPRING TO DIVIDE.
7. PUT THE TUBERS INTO A CARDBOARD BOX OR CRATE WITH DAMPENED PEAT MOSS (NOT TOO WET OR THE TUBERS WILL ROT).
8. STORE IN A COOL SPOT IN THE BASEMENT UNTIL MARCH.
9. POT UP IN EARLY MARCH AND YOU WILL HAVE BEAUTIFUL DAHLIAS AGAIN NEXT YEAR!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 5:24 PM 0 Comments

Friday, September 28, 2012

FALL LAWN CARE

FALL LAWN CARE

1. APPLY FALL FERTILIZER NOW, IF NOT OVERSEEDING YOUR LAWN.
2. IF OVERSEEDING – MOW GRASS TO ABOUT 1 ½” – OVERSEEDING IS SEEDING OVER EXISTING GRASS TO FILL IN BARE PATCHES AND THICKEN UP THE GRASS TO CHOKE OUT WEEDS.
3. BAG OR RAKE UP ALL THE GRASS CLIPPINGS.
4. DO A CORE AERATION – DON’T JUST PUT ON YOUR GOLF SHOES AND WALK OVER THE LAWN!!!
5. SPREAD ABOUT ¼” OF SCREENED TOPSOIL OR PEAT MOSS AND RAKE IT IN. I LIKE USING PEAT MOSS AS IT HAS NO WEEDS.  WHEN USING PEAT MOSS, PUT IT IN A WHEELBARROW OR MUCK BUCKET AND ADD WATER UNTIL IT BECOMES LIKE A THICK SOUP.  THEN APPLY IT TO YOUR LAWN AND RAKE IT IN.
6. CHOOSE A GOOD QUALITY OF GRASS SEED PREFERABLY WITH A LOT OF DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF FESCUE, RYE AND KENTUCKY BLUE GRASS.
7. BROADCAST THE SEED WITH A GRASS OR FERTILIZER SPREADER.
8. USE A ROLLER OR TAMP THE GRASS SEED DOWN WITH YOUR RAKE.   IT MUST COME IN CONTACT WITH THE SOIL TO GERMINATE.
9. WATER.
10. DORMANT SEEDING IS DONE MID TO LATE OCTOBER, JUST BEFORE THE FIRST SNOW.    SEEDS WILL LAY DORMANT UNDER THE SOIL AND GERMINATE IN EARLY SPRING WITH THE HEAT AND MOISTURE.
11. IN EARLY SPRING THE SEEDS WILL GERMINATE WITH THE HEAT AND MOISTURE AND CHOKE OUT THE WEEDS!
12. ENJOY A BEAUTIFUL GREEN, THICK LAWN!


Jensen Nursery and Garden Center
2550 McGillivray Blvd
Winnipeg, Manitoba
(204)488-5042

Jensennursery.com
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:59 PM 1 Comments

Thursday, September 06, 2012

Arlene’s Homemade Squirrel Repellent



Fill a 1 ½  - 2 qt. saucepan with water and heat to boiling.  Peel and chop an onion and two jalapeno peppers into small pieces and add to boiling water.  Add 1 Tablespoon each of paprika and cayenne pepper to the mix. Stir and simmer for 15 – 25 minutes.  Let the mixture cool.  Pour the mixture through a strainer into a bowl.  Pour the strained mixture into a spray bottle.  Spray the plant or the area where you have planted the bulbs.  Re-spray after a rain. As an added deterrent, sprinkle cayenne pepper and paprika over the area.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:20 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Container Gardening by Arlene


Arlene’s Container Gardening Tips

Container gardening can be a lot of fun and very rewarding. Here are some tips I’ve gathered through the years to be successful:

Choosing the right container

SIZE MATTERS!!!

TIP - Choose a container that is at least 12” in diameter. Smaller containers dry out very quickly in hot weather. The container must also have drainage holes to allow for moisture to drain out if over-watering occurs or if they are out in rain.

There are many different containers to choose from to hang or place on the ground. There are wire baskets with a coco liner or lined with sphagnum moss; plastic, fiberglass, self-watering; glazed, terra cotta, metal and wooden containers.
TIP - When using clay or terra cotta, soak the container in a tub of water until the air bubbles subside before you pot them up, to avoid drying out the soil. Also, place a saucer of water underneath to keep them moist.
TIP – When using baskets lined with either a coco liner or sphagnum, put a plastic liner punched with holes, over-top of the coco or sphagnum liner and then plant your plants. The basket will not dry out so quickly.

Darker coloured containers attract the heat more than lighter coloured ones, so keep that in mind if you plan on spending weekends away. Use light coloured containers for the sunny spots.

Choosing the right soil

A peat based soil less mix dries out more quickly than a quality potting soil. Choose a quality potting soil specific for containers or hanging baskets that contain key nutrients. Consider using a product such as Soil Moist that contains water crystals that hold water and release it into the soil as it dries. Soil Moist is added to the soil before you plant. Add compost to enrich your soil.
TIP – Don’t use soil from the garden as it will compact, be heavy and may contain insect or disease.

Choosing the right plants

Choose the right plants for the conditions (sun or shade). If you get away on the weekends and have your hanging baskets or containers in hot dry sun, choose annuals such as Geraniums, Strawflower, Portulaca, Million bells, Osteospermum, Cosmos, Lantana. Scaevola, Marigolds, Heliotrope, Salvia, Celosia, Verbena, Gazania, Ice Plant, or Castor Bean, to name a few, that will tolerate a lot of hot and dry.

Keeping your plants healthy

Fertilizing
Add compost to enrich the soil before you plant or use a slow release fertilizer that breaks down with heat and moisture.  Some slow release fertilizers last for up to four months.  If you haven’t improved the soil, you may also want to use a water soluble fertilizer or an organic fertilizer such as sea weed or fish emulsion to supplement until the slow release fertilizer starts breaking down.

Deadheading
Remove the spent flowers by removing the flower head right back to the stem to keep the plant from going to seed.

Checking for insects and disease
Check for insects and disease regularly and deal with the problem immediately before the plants gets stressed or destroyed.

Watering
Water your hanging baskets or containers slowly to insure the entire container is moist.  For hanging baskets, you may want to submerge the basket in a bucket of water until air bubbles subside. This way you know the basket is very well watered.
TIP – The feeder roots will gravitate to the outside of the container so make sure the soil at the edges of the container is well watered.
Water bulbs are available to fill and leave in your container when you are away.  I have also filled 2 litre plastic bottles, punched a few holes in them and turned them upside down in a large to container to drip water slowly into the soil when I am away for a few days.

Mulching
The use of mulch in containers also helps keep in moisture and keep the soil cool.

TIP – if you are going to be away for a number of days and are not able to have someone come in to water while you are away, you might consider moving smaller baskets and containers inside or into a shady, sheltered area outside to keep them from drying out in the hot sun.

TIP – If you have planted perennials or shrubs in containers for the summer, make sure you remove them from the container and get them planted into the ground by the middle to the end of September to insure they settle in before winter.

These are some tips that I have used over the years to keep my hanging baskets and containers looking in top shape all summer long!  If you keep your plants healthy, they will be able to survive on their own through periods of both drought and a lot of rain!

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 1:24 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, August 02, 2012

Arlene’s Mid-Summer Tomato Tips

Arlene’s Mid-Summer Tomato Tips

This is the time of year we should be starting to enjoy some tasty, home-grown tomatoes.

Here are some tips:

Don’t forget – Tomatoes are calcium lovers, so save your eggshells to work in around your plants or add bonemeal to prevent the Blossom End Rot (the black end on the tomato).

Water the soil around the tomato plant and not overtop.

If you are a smoker, wash your hands with soap and water thoroughly before handling the tomato plants to prevent the Tomato Mosaic Virus.  This virus produces distorted leaves and blotches on the fruit.

Remove all the suckers (the stems that grow out between the main and side shoots).

Once the tomato plant has set fruit, remove all the stems underneath the fruit.

Fertilize with an organic fertilizer made by Bio Fert Manufacturing in B.C..  It is made up of plant extracts, alfalfa, kelp and soy bean mulch, natural potash, blood meal and fish emulsion (without the smell!!!).

You will have a rich tasting, larger tomato with a longer shelf life!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 4:21 PM 0 Comments

Friday, July 20, 2012

Arlene’s Favourite Gardening Poem!


Taken from the 2003 Prairie Garden Booklet
When I first read this poem in the 2003 Prairie Garden Booklet, I laughed myself silly as I could so relate!  It’s called My Wife The Gardener. Jensen’s carries the Praire Garden!

She dug the plot on Monday
The soil was rich and fine
She forgot to thaw out dinner
So we went out to dine.

She planted roses Tuesday
She says they are a must
They really are quite lovely
But she forgot to dust.

On Wednesday it was daisies
They opened with the sun
All white and pinks and yellows
But the laundry wasn’t done.

The poppies came on Thursday
A bright and cheery red
I guess she really was engrossed,
but, never made the bed.

It was Dahlias on Friday
In colours she adores
It never bothered her at all
All the crumbs upon the floors

I hired a maid on Saturday
My week was now complete
My wife can garden all she wants
The house will still be neat.

It’s nearly lunchtime Sunday
And, I can’t find the maid
Oh no!  I don’t believe it
She’s out there with a spade!!!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 2:09 PM 1 Comments

Monday, April 30, 2012

Spring Gardening Tips

Spring Gardening Tips

If you have covered your perennials or roses with leaves or flax straw (which is a great winter protection for your plants), now is the time to be taking it away.  Do it slowly.  Remove it from the area directly around your plants to allow the plants to breathe.  Don’t put it too far out of reach as you may have to bring it back as protection if our temperatures drop too far below zero at night.  The emerging perennials will be able to endure a lot of cold but remember it’s still too early to be planting out newly purchased perennials. Jensen’s carries some beautiful perennials very hardy to our area. Keep in mind if you really like a perennial, that requires sun, and you have no room left in a sunny spot, all perennials will grow in the shade.  They may not grow as large and they may not flower the way they would in sun, or have smaller blooms, but, they WILL grow.  Don’t deprive yourself of a “Must-Have” perennial.  Give it a try.  You may be pleasantly surprised!
Also, if there are areas of your garden where the soil needs amending, now is the time to enhance the soil to get the area ready for planting.  Drop in for a soil tester to find out if your soil is too acidic or alkaline.  In our clay soil, peat moss is a good product to use as to increase the acidity level in our alkaline soil and it also improves the texture and provides for improved drainage.  Clay soil tends to be very compact and makes it difficult for roots to grow.  Empty the peat moss into a wheelbarrow or muck bucket and add water.  Mix it until it is thick and resembles soil and then dig it into the area.  It is much easier to work with and it won’t be flying away to your neighbours when you start to dig it in. Compost, mushroom manure and sheep manure are also excellent products to use for soil amendment.  If you have an area where your perennials require a lot of acid in the soil and you have evergreens in the yard, save your evergreen clippings and place them around that area.
If your soil is too acid, use a Dolomite Lime to increase the alkaline level.  It is more finely ground and will break down faster in the soil.
Also, if you have recently removed an evergreen tree from the yard, that area will need a Lime to enable grass to grow. This is the perfect time of year to get the area ready for seeding as most lawns prefer a soil that is nearly neutral; in the range of a PH level of 6.5 – 7.2 (PH 7.0 is neutral).
The majority of plants grow best in a PH level of 6.5 – 7.2 as well.
Tomatoes enjoy a handful of Dolomite Lime when planting and periodically throughout the grow season to discourage Blossom End Rot (the black end on the Tomato).
Stay tuned next time for more “Spring Gardening Tips”

Arlene Wheeler

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:32 PM 1 Comments

Friday, April 20, 2012

Slippery, Slimy Slugs, Yuck!

This is the time of year our hearts and minds turn to gardening and the great outdoors!  We live in Winnipeg, wait 5 minutes and the weather will change! 

Think of some of the problem areas of your garden instead and this is the time of year to deal with them.

Slugs are slimy creatures resembling snails that come up from the ground at night and make holes in your beautiful plants (they really love hosta), leaving a slimy white trail in their wake.
If you have had a problem with slugs in a particular area of your garden, now is the time to get out the fan rake and lightly rake the soil.  In giving the area a light raking, it will bring up all the eggs the slugs have laid and you will be providing food for all the birds coming into your yard, while reducing the number of slugs.  Often times they love to lay their eggs all along a sidewalk or walkway so rake the soil lightly along these areas. Be careful not to compact the soil by walking on it.  Take a long board out to the garden area with you to use to walk on so as not to compact the soil by walking on it. To encourage birds into your garden area, place some drier lint out by a shrub or tree.  They will soon find it to help build their nests and will help rid your garden area of slugs at the same time.

Here are a few more tips to rid your garden area of Slugs.
1. Ammonia Spray:  Mix 1 part ammonia to 10 parts of water.  Spray on slugs in early morning or late at night when they like to come out and do their damage.  It does not hurt the plants; however, you should be careful not to spray everywhere as it will kill the good insects as well.
2. Barrier method: Around the base of the plants under attack, right around the stem, use baby powder or talc which will stick to their gummy bodies.  They will not go through it, or, if they do, it will kill them eventually.  An inch of sand, the coarser the better, like a moat, the sharpness of the grains make it unpleasant to impassable for most slugs.  Copper bands apparently cause a shock to slugs.  This can be bought in a tape form at most garden centers.
3. Boiling Water: In the very early spring pour boiling water along any hard edge that is in contact with the soil of the bed.  This would be like a sidewalk, fence or edging material including large stones or rocks.  This will kill the eggs.  This can be challenging if you have huge spaces that fit this definition.  Apply in areas where there is a lot of moisture or shade where you are having a serious snail colony problem.
4. Egg Shells – Save your egg shells, break them up and add around the plants in your garden that are affected.  They will help cut their skin and they will tend to keep away from your plants.

If your slug problems persist, drop into our garden center and pick up some slug bait to rid your garden of the nasty, slimy ones!
 
Arlene Wheeler
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:25 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Thanks for attending our Spring Seminars

I want to thank everyone who attended our Spring seminar day April14th, 2012. We had over 50 people over the course of the day! We all enjoyed the day very much!
Jennifer gave her first seminar - Gardening for Dummies! It was fun, humerous, and informative! Way to go Jennifer! We definitely will have to repeat that seminar!
Sue had a interesting discussion panel on all those nasty critters that lurk in your yards waiting to eat your plants!! Critter's Anomynous was a great success! Grant Dunn came and introduced some great new products. He went over all the products we carry for different garden concerns. Thanks Grant! We look forward to staff training next week. And Bill Dowie our resident Master Gardener gave 2 interesting seminars on 3D and 4D gardening.
 

ca.linkedin.com/in/williamdowie -Check our Bill's Profile

Now that the seminars are done we will be out setting up our tree, shrub, perennial, and display gardens outside. New stock starts arriving April 18th! With this weather we already have a waiting list going for trees as they come in the door! It is going to be a exciting spring! Drop by and check out what is new at Jensen's this spring!
Tammy
 
3D and 4D as presented by Bill Dowie -

William (Bill) Dowie BA, MCPM, LEED-AP (O+M)
Independent Environmental Consultant
Master Gardener Program Graduate
Guest Design Consultant

 3-D Gardening Designing to maximize all the Space in your yard and garden Many gardeners have the knowledge and skills to move vertically in their garden;

3-D gardening is so much more. Inter-spaces, nooks and crannies, cracks, edges, layers... these are key concepts to make your garden beautiful while increasing the amount of usable space – so you can plant all those varieties of flowers and vegetables you’ve been eyeing. Think you have run out of room? Wondering how to increase bio-diversity in your small yard? This first of two seminars will introduce you to spatial concepts of the space-time continuum you may have not have thought about.
Concepts Discussed…

shapes in space = x-y flat | z-vertical | beyond simple planar vertical
small cracks and openings have large volumes behind / under them
raised beds (bonus = 4-D benefits)
polar coordinates – vectors and angles in space
tree limbs and pruning – how you want the tree to grow in 20 years = where
micro-spaces in your yard (frost movement | solar gain | nooks and coziness)
plant size (intra / inter)
landscape ecology and edge
wildlife & naturalization – from the sub-basement to the penthouse
the underground world – The Douglas Fir = Mother Tree (“Smarty Plants” – NoT, CBC)
Jensen’s Nursery Spring Seminar Series


http://ca.linkedin.com/in/williamdowie
cwcdesigngroup@yahoo.ca
204-888-8012
Residential Walkabouts | Urban-scape Enhancements | Landscape Design-Build
www.jensennursery.com/blog/post.cfm?Title=Free_Spring_Gardening_Seminars_-_April_14,_2012
William (Bill) Dowie BA, MCPM, LEED-AP (O+M)
Independent Environmental Consultant
Master Gardener Program Graduate
Guest Design Consultant

 4-D Gardening Thinking about the aspects of Time for your short and long-term garden plans Time is fleeting. As humans, we are caught in a linear perception of time passing second by second, year by year. In Nature, the concept of time is irrelevant. Nature is dictated by cycles – ebbs and flows of matter and energy. So how do we reconcile such philosophical ideas to make a beautiful garden? This seminar will explore the themes of legacy planting, time-framing your designs, plant succession, and the young-to-old transition of your human and animal visitors to your yard (that rabbit seems like it is 20 years old!). This second of two seminars will introduce you to the temporal concepts of the space-time continuum you may have not have thought about.

Concepts Discussed
time and space sometimes is the same thing (for us humans and social insects)
natural cycles v. human calendar (the time honored battle)
legacy – what stage in life are you at? Stakeholder needs and alignment
time scale – shifts with weather & climate (from seconds to centuries)
maintenance time scales = mowing | watering | weeding | dividing | pruning
intra / inter-seasonality | dormancy | active growing
critical timings – veggies and growth | blooming periods
when to plant / transplant
succession – from lawn to natural prairie to forest (if that’s what you want)
garden philosophy – time and space – just have fun (please)!
Jensen’s Nursery Spring Seminar Series
April 14th, 2012 (live, on location)
Welcome to the space-time continuum of gardening... What? This sounds like science fiction - something you would hear on The Big Bang Theory... but yes, even gardeners have to know about the multi-dimensions of the universe to make their gardens beautiful and sustainable... Intrigued?

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:58 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Gardening Saturday 2012 -This Saturday!!!! See you there!

 
gardening Saturday 2012



GARDENING SATURDAY - MORE INFORMATION


Come and see our booth #5 and #6 at Gardening Saturday on March 31, 2012. Arlene from Jensen's will be holding a seminar on gardening with kids. Bring the kids down and give them a chance to do a bit of planting! Call 895-4560 to book, or go online to www. gardensmanitoba.com to register. We will be having free demonstrations at our booth at 11 am and 2 pm! Hope to see you all there!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Happy Winter to all the gardeners out there!

I'm not sure about everyone else, but after a return to typical winter weather I am ready for spring! I went into work Wednesday for the first time. After putting away Christmas  we met with a lady from the Forks about flowers for next year. It really got my brain back into the swing of things again! I think I had forgotten what a Karl Forester grass was! Now I'm ready to start planning my yard for spring again! This is a great time of year to check out our plant search engine and start planning for spring. I have also received a email from Bill Dowie with some great ideas for spring seminars. I will keep everyone posted when we set a date. It should be sometime in early April. Anyway I'm off work till next wednesday so I must return to painting my house and babysitting Kato the pug and Ziegler the cat!
pug, Jensen Nursery
Kato


Ziegler
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 2 Comments

Friday, November 25, 2011

Sue's First Blog - by Sue the Other Sister!

Well, I decided it was time. It’s only been a year since my dear sister, Tammy asked me to write a blog. With my track record I figure I’m right on schedule. I can hardly believe that it’s time to make the switch from Landscaping to selling Christmas trees.

We’ve been having a lot of fun finishing the last few jobs. The last two weeks have been working at the Youth for Christ Building at Main and Higgins. It absolutely amazes me that you can have so many trades people, trucks and equipment on one site and nobody hits anything. This particular site being down town was the dreaded site of the year. Due to the lack of parking, vehicle and people traffic I was picturing this site as a nightmare. I was pleasantly surprised that everything when extremely well. The trades people and site supervisors have been amazing. All the different trades have worked together with efficiency and grace. There was not a day where I felt we were hindering someone else’s job. Everyone seemed to work together making sure that they were not undoing each other’s work.

We even got a few surprises. Shortly after remarking that I seemed to have a horseshoe stuck in a particular part of my body. This was said because everything on site fell into place just perfectly. From the tree delivery, soil drop offs to the excavator John who helped us out. Mark and Scott actually dug up an old Horseshoe. It looks like it may be from the early to mid 1900’s. It will soon be hanging above our garage door with hopes that it will continue to bring us all more luck.

Well as we wrap up our landscaping season another time is upon us. Yes it is here!!!! I’ve been waiting for this all year. IT’S FINALLY HERE, IT’S FINALLY HERE. It’s time for me to go from the hardhat, safety vest wearing Landscape Girl to...... CRAFT GIRL. Yes that’s right CRAFT GIRL. Instead of thinking about tree planting, semi loads of soil and mountains of Cedar Bark. My head in filling with designs for Outdoor Containers, Center Pieces, and Wreaths, and of course Bow making. So please come by with your containers or ideas and let us help you add some beauty to your Christmas.

Or stop by and pick out the perfect Fresh Christmas Tree. We have an amazing selection of Balsam Fir, Fraser Fir, Noble fir, Nordman Fir and some Manitoba Spruce. You can shop indoors, pick your tree and have us deliver it for free. ( within Winnipeg, Oak Bluff, Sanford or LaSalle )

Have a Happy Christmas Season!!!

Susan Jensen Stubbe
(The Other Sister)

Youth for Christ buiilding, Landscaping, Jensen Nursery and Landscaping
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 6:49 AM 1 Comments

Monday, October 31, 2011

Upcycling with Bill Dowie

Download Attachment...

Recycling brought to a new level! Upcycling is the lastest garden trend!
For those who were lucky enough to attend our Up-Cycling seminar this September here is the promised PDF file!
If you would like to know more on Upcycling open our attachment and learn more! We will definitely be holding more seminars on Up-Cycling in the spring!
I am hoping to get seminars under way as early as March this year! If anyone has subjects that they would be interested in feel free to contact me at tammy@jensennursery.com

Happy gardening!
Tammy Jensen

up-Cycling, Bill Dowie, Jensen Nursery garden seminars
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 11:39 AM 0 Comments

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Gardening in busy times!

Well it is 9 pm sunday night. Most people are settled in for the night getting ready for the week. But when you are in the gardening business.........things work a little different! I thought I'd let you all dwell into a day in the life of a Jensen! I'm hoping my staff will all follow suit and do a blog about how it is to work at Jensen's!
 
I started my day off with a cup of coffee, a wish that I could stay where I was..... all snuggled up, and a drive across town to work. As usual I wasn't the first one there! After working 60 hour weeks for a while you tend to slow down! But once I get moving, watch out! Father's Day and Marathon day typically are a bit slow for us. Well apparently my website is working or something! Because after I decided I would fertilize every single basket and container pot...people started trailing in. So here I am in the middle of the greenhouse with about 150 baskets waiting for fertilizer on the ground! Nobody can get down the aisles, everyone wants help in a completely different area of the garden center! To sum it up CHAOS! So some how I fertilized every single annual basket and annual container, and put them back where they belong!

The rest of the day went fairly smooth! Because I was moving petunia baskets around I got all sticky and extremely dirty! So by the end of the day I looked like a mess! But believe it or not , sweat, dirt and all.........boy did I have fun!

So then, when it is time to go, what do I do? Sit down with my sister who I have not had time to talk with in days. So we catch up, on all the business matters we have not had time to deal with all week. Greenhouse talk, tree talk, watering system talk, how to deal with stress talk!etc. etc. etc! So then I go home..

 What do  I do then? Go out, cut my lawn, spray Killex for weeds, Round- Up in the area I want to turn into a patio for the swing and fire pit! Repot my flowers into a bigger ceramic pot adding torenia, and yellow sweet potatoe vine.

Finally  I crawl into my house...thank my daughter who has been busy cleaning my house for chore money. Spend some time catching up with my daughter, talking on the phone...it's off to bed I go! ...............

Off to bed I go! When I wake hopefully the sun is shining, the ferilizer kicked in, and all is happy! Tammy
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:59 PM 1 Comments

Friday, May 27, 2011

When you see someone without a smile give them yours!

Yesterday at the end of a long day I put that up on my staff bulletin board. This weather lately has been crazy to say the least. And not agreeable to Manitoba gardeners. Frost warning, no frost warning, hot summer weather, cold arctic winds, dreary rainy days..... where is our famous Manitoba summer? I'm seeing frustration in my customers, my staff, and feeling it myself. Last night I decided it was time for the season to start in spite of the weather. I came home after a 12 hour day and started digging out weeds and planting perennials and annuals. The first thing I planted was a  large 9' high piece of driftwood! Behind it I planted a cup and saucer vine that will grow up the driftwood and create an interesting feature right in my front yard. In front of it I have a summer wine ninebark. The dark color of the ninebark makes the driftwood stand out more! When the flowers bloom on the vine and the ninebark I think it will be gorgeous!
After that I started digging out some unusual weeds that have taken over my rock garden. Roundup would have been easier but working by hand is quicker and more therapeutic! In that bed in front of lovely piece of driftwood I found at Patricia Beach I planted 3 fireworks fountain grass. I figure it will delicately fall over the driftwood! Next I moved on to the herb garden I planted along my garage. I actually made a raised herb garden using some railway ties that were lying around my yard. I put a climbing spinach vine in the middle to grow up my trellis. I put lemon balm(for tea), mint(for mohito`s), rosemary, oregano, and thyme for cooking. Then I crawled into the house, hugged the kids goodnight, and settled in for a good rest before a new day begins! Wishing everyone a good weekend and happy gardening! I would love to hear some gardening stories. If you have an interesting one send it to me. I can post the most interesting one on our blog each week! Tammy Jensen

             
                                                                                                          

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:02 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Sun, Shrubs, Trees, Soil, Stone, and Flowers galore!

The sun is shining! Spring is finally here! Everytime I look out the window a truck is driving up with a fresh load of shrubs, trees, evergreens, and more! We are in the process of building a new system to display and care for the trees! We also have some very hard working guys potting up truckloads of bareroot trees and shrubs. By tomorrow they will be done, and will start bagging more mulch, riverstone, limestone, shale, soil, and what ever else we can bring them! Jennifer is running around trying to put up signs as quickly as the plants arrive. Chelsey is back for her second year running out to greet all the customers!Laura is taking care of all the annuals and baskets in the greenhouse. Karl AKA Mr Jensen is busy planning and designing the outdoor shrub area. Drop by and check out all the excitement. It may not be organized quite yet, but the plants are here just waiting for a new home. I now have a PDF version of our catalogues available online. There is the shrub and tree plant list, and the perennial list. Just email me at tammy@jensennursery.com  and I will send it to you! Happy gardening!~ Tammy
clematis, greenhouse, Jensen nursery and garden center, winnipeg
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Friday, April 08, 2011

Chuck Manigione and the Greenhouse by Jen

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I am truly hopeful and optimistic that winter is over. In the car last night, driving my daughter to her piano lesson, we decided to listen to "Chuck" (Mangione). He had been introduced to my kids as a way of remembering my high school days.

It was a beautiful evening, still sunny, and we had the sun roof open. "Feel So Good" came on. It starts slow, like the music is just waking up. Now I start thinking about spring, warm sunshine and gardening. Nature is returning to all her glory. It's amazing how music can make connections.

Listen and see what it makes you think of. And....come by and visit us on Saturday. We have seminars and coffee. Stroll around the greenhouse. I will be there watering the flowers.



Jen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RID-gqSw85o&feature=related Click on this link to hear Chuck Manigione - Feel So Good!
Jen at Jensen Nursery and Garden Center
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

My name is Boomer by Boomer the Garden Center Dog

           Hi! My name is Boomer and I am the garden center dog. This is my first blog. I follow Sue around the garden center from January till April. I am the most wonderful and beautiful golden retriever.Oh yes, and the best behaved dog! I love being spoiled and eating the plants in the greenhouse! The grasses are the best! My favorite grass is the Fireworks Fountain Grasgarden center dog, planting box, peat moss, golden retrievers. They get real upset when I eat that because it's brand new or something. They all look the same to me! They are so tasty! I do lots of work here greeting people, chewing pots, walking on plant tables,and digging in the mud in the potting room. I also work very hard chasing away the bunnies in the back nursery area. Please come and see me in fireworks fountain grass, jensen nursery and garden center, winnipeg, greenhouse, annual grasses, outdoor container potsthe greenhouse! If you find me too big and friendly I can sit in the lunch room(yummy) and check out the lunches! Please come visit me and check out the wonderful greenhouse. See you soon!

                                                









ps. bring doogies cookies 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Container gardening at Jensen's! by Jennifer Fletcher

OKAY! I am writing a blog.....DREAMSICLE SUPERBELLS, PROVEN WINNERS, WINNIPEG, JENSEN NURSERY, WINNIPEG, GARDEN CENTERS, BEDDING PLANTS

Back in January, I wanted to talk about the new annuals and combinations for the hanging baskets.
I was ALONE with my thoughts!

One Saturday afternoon, I watched a P. Allen Smith tv show (the spokesperson for Proven Winners). He took three pots
in different sizes and planted a container landscape. He believes that you should plant different plants in each pot,
with one color that unifies them.

For example: 
             
                                                                                                                                                           
First pot: Superbells Dreamsicle                                                  

Second pot: Coleus Sedona

Third pot: Toffee Twist Grass

This example would have a orange plant in each pot with a mixture of annuals. What an idea! I will store that one in the
back of my brain.TOFFEE TWIST GRASS, PROVEN WINNERS, WINNIPEG, JENSEN NURSERY AND GARDEN CENTER, CONTAINER GARDENING

Then I went on a winter holiday. Cruising from Los Angeles to Puerto Vallarta. Did you know that Bird of Paradise
blooms in late January in California landscapes? Well...that definitely messed up my "Prairie Gardener" brain.

Back to the cold and "Jennifer, I can't talk about the hanging baskets until I see the flowers!"

Okay, I was still on my own with my thoughts - busy organizing, painting and laminating signs.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Now, the plants have come. The baskets are done and we will keep working on the pots. On a sunny day, you have to wear shorts in the greenhouse. In a few short weeks we will move outside. I can't wait. Stop by the garden centre if you like. Smell the flowers. I would be happy to help you plan your containers.
Because.....SPRING IS ON ITS WAY!!!!!

By Jennifer Fletcher























   
                             
   
               

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Monday, March 14, 2011

Gardening Saturday this Saturday March 26, 2011 at CMU

The 4th Annual Gardening Saturday will take place on Saturday, March 26th (9 a.m - 4 p.m.) at the Canadian Mennonite University North Campus

One of the most anticipated springtime gardening events for Manitoba Gardeners, Gardening Saturday will have everything you need to get ready for the spring gardening season. This year's event features 19 workshops (theme Urban Farming), an exciting Tradeshow Area ($5 admission), and delicious food in our Eat Local Grow Local Food Market.


Guest Speaker Des Kennedy
Garden Artistry: A "how to" look at the use of art works and "artistic touches" in the gardens of Ireland, New Zealand, England and China. Tickets to the keynote presentation are only $25.00 and include admission to the Trade Show.
Workshops
Register for your choice of workshops: only $10.00 per workshop. Any workshop registration includes admission to the Trade Show.
Become a Friends Member and receive a 10% discount on
keynote presentation and workshops.


Gardening Saturday Workshops


Want to learn more about gardening? Gardening Saturday's workshop presenters are local experts who will show you everything you want to know. Workshops are designed to appeal to both novice and experienced gardeners. Each workshop is 45 minutes in length and affordably priced at only $10.00 with a discount being offered for Friend's Members. Workshop registrations include admission to the trade show.


1. Landscaping: "The Wow Factor", Charlotte Tataryn. Charlotte Tataryn, Landscape and Interior Designer, Charlotte's Place, is back by popular demand to talk about the basics of landscaping: learn how to make the best of what already exists and how to get the ' wow factor ' affordably.


2. Starting a New Garden Bed, Susan LeBlanc. Wondering where to begin? Susan LeBlanc, experienced gardening enthusiast, will cover the basics from soil preparation and amendment as well as an interesting look at past and present schools of thought.


3. Chickens for WinnipEGGers, Darby & Kara Jones, of Chickens for WinnipEGGers. Urban chickens catch your fancy? The presenters will guide you through a practical approach towards the growing trend in North America of keeping a few hens in your own backyard.


4. Get to Know our Native Grasses, Shirley Froehlich. Come and see how beautiful and versatile they are and how to use them in your garden. Some nice combinations with our Manitoba wildflowers will also be shown and discussed


5. Attracting Birds to your Yard, Sherrie Versluis. Attracting Birds to your Yard Sherrie Versluis Sherrie Versluis of The Preferred Perch tells us how to attract birds to our gardens. After all, what is a garden without birdsong, or the flutter of wings.


6. Herbs, Dave Hanson. Fragrant, tasty, home grown and organic! Herbs are one of the best choices for urban organic gardens, adapting easily to containers and beds of all shapes and sizes. Dave Hanson, owner of Sage Garden Herbs, will show you how to grow a bumper crop of herbs to complement your kitchen garden, leveraging the advantages of all natural growing techniques and the value of intermingling and diversity in the landscape.


7. Container gardens for balconies and small spaces, Jim Beckta . Jim Beckta has been involved in creating lush, beautiful gardens in the smallest of spaces. From container options to raised beds, everyone can have their very own garden!


8. Gardening with Children and Youth, Jeannette Adams Master Gardener . Jeannette Adams will pique the curiosity of our youngest gardeners with tips on getting started in gardening. Parents will enjoy learning how to inspire children to garden at home as well as information on gardening with community organizations and schools.


9. All About Lilies, John Rempel . A household name in Manitoba`s gardening community, John Rempel will talk about new and different varieties, cultivation and propagation as well as an overview of the spread of the red lily beetle.


10. Panel Discussion "What’s New, What’s Hot", Joanne Jones (Growing Pleasures); Erna Wiebe (Oakridge Garden Centre, Steinbach); and Chad Labbe (Shelmerdine Garden Center); Richard Zelke (Cook's Greenhouses) and Ken Land (St Mary's Nursery and Garden Center). Panelists will discuss the newest and latest trends in gardening and all of the exciting new choices awaiting you at the garden centers this spring. Joanne Kelly, Host/Producer Shaw TV will moderate the panel discussion. Sponsored by Bylands Nurseries.


11. Irresistible Irises, Barbara Jean Jackson Master Gardener . Barbara Jean Jackson, Brandon MB. is a Mater Gardener and member of the CanWest Iris Society. This presentation will look at many different varieties of the beautiful Iris species and how to grow them successfully in the prairie garden. Attendees will also take a pictorial walk through Barbara Jean's iris gardens in Brandon.


12. Covering Lots of Ground , Linda Dietrick. Using slides, Presenter Linda Dietrick explores over fifty hardy ground covers for our region. Every gardener has a problem area. Linda suggests solutions for sun and shade, moist soil and dry.


13. Plants for the (Small) Home Landscape, Susan Jensen Stubbe of Jensen's Nursery & Garden Center . Oversized plants taking over your landscape? Susan will recommend which perennials, shrubs and trees are suitable for the smaller landscape and which ones to avoid.


14. Drainage Problems? Create a Rain Garden!, Jodi Goerzen from the Seine-Rat River Conservation District and Chris Maxemuck from C & S Country Gardens. A rain garden is a colourful, perennial planting within a shallow depression that is designed to capture and use rain water that may otherwise run off. This presentation will include discussion of rain garden theory and a demonstration rain garden at C & S Country Gardens being used as a case study.


15. How to Can and Preserve Your Garden Harvest, Judy Schwartz. Jellies, pickles, chutneys, anyone? And don’t forget the tomatoes! Judy will provide information on how to preserve the produce from your garden.


16. Caring for Fruit Trees, Mike Allen. Fruit trees are all the rage. With many new and interesting varieties available to be grown on the prairies, Mike Allen, respected Arborist and owner of Viburnum Trees Experts will explore the topic of fruit tree maintenance.


17. Creating Edible Urban Spaces, Urban Eatin. The experts at Urban Eatin Gardeners Co-op know all about creating vegetable gardens. Want to be part of a co-op? They can tell you everything you need to know!


18. Propogation, Karen Loewen . A fast and easy way to expand your garden affordably. Learn how to propagate your perennials, trees and shrubs with Master Gardener Karen Loewen.


19. Container Gardening, Sharlene Nielsen. Observe Sharlene in action as she provides instruction to 10 participants, who will be creating their own Spring Garden containers in front of you


Workshop Information 2011 Gardening Saturday Registration Form


Please consider lending your time and talents to Gardening Saturday by volunteering . Volunteers receive free admission - we have many interesting opportunities to connect with other gardeners, assist in workshops or in the Trade Show/Food Market areas

If you would like to volunteer,
please contact Helene Fairbanks at 895-4560, execdir@mts.net  OR CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION


Hope to see you all there!!
Tammy & Sue!

 Jensen Nursery and Garden Center
2550 McGillivray Blvd
Winnipeg, Manitoba
(204)488-5042

MARCH HOURS: Monday to Friday 10am -4pm






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Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:22 PM 0 Comments