Sunday, March 06, 2022

Starting Seeds Indoors

What  better thing to do on a snowy winter day, than to start some seeds! We have had such a long cold winter, we need to see some hint of spring.   
 
When: It’s a great time to start planning you vegetable garden and gathering your supplies to start seeding inside.  The best time to seed inside is Mid March to April. Refer to our Seed Starting Chart for the best time for seeding vegetables and herbs. For flower seeds, just check on the package how many weeks to seed before the last frost. Then you can count back from May 24th. 
 
Which Seed: Which seeds 
should I be starting you ask.  The best ones are Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Leeks, Kohlrabi, Peppers and tomatoes.  You can try other seeds but most will germinate and establish quite quickly when directly sown into the ground.  Most of your root vegetables won’t transplant well, thus they have t
o be sown directly.  Also let’s not forget fresh herbs.
 
Pots and Containers: Seeds are best planted in individual pots or trays with individual cells to make transplanting easy.  You can use plastic or peat pots, yogurt containers and egg cartons.  Almost any container will work but make sure there are drainage holes in the bottom.  Seeds and young seedlings don’t like to have we
t feet.  If you are reusing plastic pots be sure to soak them in warm water and bleach at a rate of 9 parts water to 1part bleach to kill any pathogens or bacteria that is present.
 
Soil Mixture: A nice sterilized peat mixture is a great soil to seed in.  Such as Terra Organic Potting Soil.  In a larger container, such as a rubber maid container place you soil and add water to moisten it.  You want it to be moist but not dripping wet.  Fill your containers to ¼” below the top and pat it down.  Place two or three seeds in each container and then cover with soil.  To water the seed I like to use a spray bottle.  A watering can be too forceful and wash the seeds out of the container.
 
Where and Watering: Place the pots in a sunny warm location.  On top of your fridge is an excellent warm spot.  Keep the soil moist.  As the seedling grows it is a good idea to let the top layer of soil dry out between watering.  This will help prevent the plants from rotting or damping off.
 
Thinning Out: Once the seedlings have started to grow it is best to thin them out so that you leave the strongest growing one in the container.
 
Hardening Off: As we approach the transplanting time, which is usually End of May beginning of June in Manitoba, you will need to harden your plants off.  To take them directly outside and plant into the garden would be shock for most plants.  Hardening off is quite easy.  A week before you plan to transplant the plants you need to move them outside into a sheltered spot of a little bit each day.  Start with a two hour period the first day and increase it one hour a day for the rest of the week.
 
Planting Out
: Make sure the plants are thoroughly moist a few hours before transplanting.  This will help the soil stay on the roots.  The best time to transplant is on a cloudy day, late in the afternoon.  This will allow the plants to get use to their surrounding before the hot sun is on them.  Gently tip the plants and take them out of their pots taking as much of the soil as you can.  Place them into a hole that is slightly larger than the pot.  Lightly pack the soil around them and water in.  Continue watering daily until new grow appears.  At this stage let the soil slightly dry between watering.
 
 
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:17 PM 0 Comments

Saturday, June 30, 2018

Purple Coneflowers

  DROUGHT TOLERANT & PERENNIAL :   Purple Coneflower      
 
This coneflower is the original native form, single purple-pink petals surrounding a dark center, which has a long bloom time.
 
Coneflowers are very resilient.
 
Coneflowers now come in many different varieties (single, double, or triple types) and colours (white, raspberry, orange, red  and yellow) .
 
Coneflowers generally grow 2 to 3 feet tall with a spread of 2 feet. 
 
They bloom from early summer until fall.
 
They’re a favorite with butterflies and bees.
 
They make excellent cut flowers for indoor bouquets. 
Prefers full to part sun with average to dry, well-drained soil. 
 
The roots, leaves, and flowers are medicinal,  
 
Self sows if seed heads are left to overwinter.
 
 purple coneflower, drought tolerant flowers, drought tolerant perennials, winnipeg garden centers, perennials winnipeg, purple perennials
 
 
 
 















Growing Tip: Single-flowering forms often live longer than the double or triple types.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:41 AM 0 Comments

Monday, June 25, 2018

Astilbes for the Shade Garden

 SHADE PLANT FEATURE:    Astible  
Astilbe is a tall, summertime bloomer that adds interest and texture to the garden even after the pink, white or red flowers have dried up and turned brown.  
 
Their leaf foliage is feathery and clumps at the base of the plant. 
 
The heights vary depending on kind,  15 inches to 30 inches.
 
Deer do not particularly like them.    
 
astilbe, shade plants, winnipeg garden centers
 






































Growing Tip:    Astibles benefit from a bit of protection to get them through the severe winters, a fine layer of mulch, such as chopped leaves or straw.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:41 AM 0 Comments

Monday, September 14, 2015

Tulips

Planting fall bulbs are a great way to bring blooms to your garden in the spring.  When choosing which ones to plant, try to mix all the blooming times - early, mid and late spring.  You can choose from tulips, daffodils, hyacinth, alliums and scilla.
The bulbs should be planted in a sunny location to receive at least 6 hours of sun.  But 8 - 10 hours would give you the best flowering.
They should be planted about 3 times as deep as the height of the bulb, but an inch or two deeper will give them extra protection.  You can add bulb fertilizer or bone meal at this time.  After blooming, remove the faded flowers so they don’t go to seed.  Let the foliage yellow and die back naturally so that energy goes back into the bulb for next year.
Naturalizing refers to a process by which you plant self-propagating bulbs in an informal setting.  They will require little or no human care, and will produce their own garden.

Tulips are probably the most popular fall bulb.  We have ordered five different types this year.

Darwin - are the longest living tulips with the largest flowers.
            - have tall, strong stems and strong petals that withstand wind and rain

Fosteriana - one of the earliest tulips to bloom
                  - have very wide flowers on strong stems

Lily flowering - blooms have pointed tips and very strong stems

Botanical - create a very natural look as they come from a wild species
                - some of the longest flowering tulips
                - a great choice for naturalizing

Double Peony - generally bloom in late spring with short, sturdy stems

There are other varieties of fall bulbs you can choose from.  Mixing these in to your tulip garden would be lovely.

Scilla - referred to as “glory of the snow”

         - bloom in very early spring and are extremely hardy
     - blooms usually last a few weeks
     - beautiful in a rock garden or in mass plantings

Muscari  - or Grape hyacinth
               - blooms last forever and are very fragrant
              - a shorter bloom to go in front of tulips
              - deer resistant

Trumpet Narcissus
- the most traditional daffodil
   - single stemmed, with big trumpets
      - deer resistant

Allium - belong to the onion family
      - easy to grow and long lived
         - deer resistant

It is a great time to do some planting - including fall bulbs.  Just when most everything in your garden is finished you can have some fun making a new spectacular spring garden.

Jennifer
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 3:57 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Dormant Oil - Spring Application

Dormant Oil Kits contain Horticultural Oil and Lime Sulphur that are combined and sprayed on most Deciduous Trees and Shrubs.  These oils help clean up any overwintering eggs or fungi on your trees and shrubs. It is an excellent and environmentally friendly way to get ahead of insect and disease problems on your Fruit trees, Ornamental Trees, Cranberry, Roses, Dogwoods and many other trees and shrubs.
It's time to apply your Dormant Oil !  Dormant Oil Kits contain Horticultural Oil and Lime Sulphur that are combined and sprayed on most Deciduous Trees and Shrubs.  These oils help clean up any overwintering eggs or fungi on your trees and shrubs. It is an excellent and environmentally friendly way to get ahead of insect and disease problems on your Fruit trees, Ornamental Trees, Cranberry, Roses, Dogwoods and many other trees and shrubs.  Dormant Oil must be sprayed before the leaves emerge and when the buds are just beginning to swell.  Spray in early morning to allow sufficient time to dry before nightfall.  You want to pick a day that there is no rain in the forecast and the temperature will stay above 4°C.   Dormant Oils will help control scale insects, mites(maple gall Mites), aphids, apple scab, powdery mildew, and anthracnose.  It is an excellent general clean up for any garden. gall mite on maple, disease, dormant oil, jenesn nurseryoyster shell scale, dormant oil, jensen nursery
                    Black spot on roses                                                  Gall mite on Maple tree                                         oyster shell scale
 
Dormant Oil must be sprayed before the leaves emerge and when the buds are just beginning to swell.  Spray in early morning to allow sufficient time to dry before nightfall.  You want to pick a day that there is no rain in the forecast and the temperature will stay above 4°C. 
 
Dormant Oils will help control scale insects, mites(maple gall Mites), aphids, apple scab, powdery mildew, and anthracnose.  It is an excellent general clean up for any garden.

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                    Powdery mildew                                                 Dormant Oil Spray Kit
 
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:45 AM 0 Comments

Monday, February 17, 2014

A Day in the life of Karl!

  All in a day’s work.
Jensen Nursery has been a contributor to the Scandinavian Centre for a number of years through advertising and donations of gift certificates to many events annually. To make this possible, I will like to give you an account of a traditional day at work, leading up to Christmas.
Christmas is getting close and I know, we will have a busy day at work selling Christmas trees. On the long drive to work I curse the City for the poor planning of road infrastructure and the poor drivers ahead of me, but look forward to a nice cup of coffee, waiting for me at work. When I finally arrive, I am greeted by a chilling look from Susan, my boss that says “you are finally here”. I steer directly to the lunch room for my coffee and stop dead in my tracks. “What, no coffee”, I yell. Jennifer enters the lunch room. “You want coffee, you make your own. We are too busy to bother with that,” She exclaims” Jean now enters with a big smile.”I’ll make the coffee for you and bring it to you when it is ready, go help the girls in the greenhouse. As I enter the greenhouse, Jennifer and Susan M. (Macpherson) are getting trees ready for delivery. “What took you so long? Give us a hand doing these fresh-cuts” she says, giving me a certain look. “You know I’m not much good till I’ve had my coffee” I explain. Just then, as if she has read my mind, Jean enters with a cup of coffee and I’m ready to go. With my coffee in my left hand and a saw in my right, I can now do a fresh-cut on the trees, only to hear my boss, Susan complaining. “You are cutting crooked, how can we make the tree stand straight with a cut like that” Looking at a pretty good cut I say defiantly,” Well if we had a good saw that could cut straight, you would have a perfect cut.”
As we continue getting the trees ready for delivery, the first customers of the day enter the greenhouse. This gives me a chance to finish my coffee and help the people at the same time, leaving the heavy work to Jennifer and the two Susan’s. It is not hard to sell a tree as we have a really nice selection and in no time at all I have made a sale. Now I just have to take it down from it’s hanging position. I swallow the last of my coffee and go to work, only to hear the girls yelling for me to come give them a hand. More costumers arrive and now we all rush to serve them. We blame this on Tammy, who has been busy advertising our services. Come in, bring your tree stand and pick your tree. We will then give it a fresh-cut, put it in the stand for you and send it out right into your living-room, and there for people are coming in droves buying their trees. 
Late in the morning Elsie arrives, bringing Kurt to work. Elsie doesn’t look too happy. “Keep him here the rest of the day,” she says, “I’m going to the Scandinavian Centre for the Norwegian lunch without him,” she says and off she goes. Kurt wanders around the greenhouse mumbling something only he understands and then disappears out to the garage. We are now close to noon and two more staff arrive, Laura and Jane. “Anything we can help with” they both ask and instead of replying we simply hand them tools to cut plastic with and point to the trees waiting to be wrapped. At this time the girls are noticing that I am slowing down. “Don’t lift the trees by yourself, let me help you. You are getting too old to do it by yourself,” Susan M says and the other girls soon follow suit. Looking like my pride has been hurt, I manage to hide my pleasure of being pampered.
It is now one o’clock and I have to teach a group of ladies how to make wreaths. Another staff member, Arlene will teach another group to make center pieces. This gives me a break from the hustle and bustle in the greenhouse, but Jean soon lets me know that I am needed there as well, so back and forth I go. The end of the day is nearing and Elsie returns from the Centre, this time with a smile on her face from having a nice visit with friends from the Centre. Kurt has come back from the garage and has wandered around the greenhouse, mumbling his own language. He too now has a smile on his face. He has been counting the trees and learned how many we have sold in the course of the day and he is pleased. Everybody is exhausted from the day’s work but already they are discussing the plans for the next day.
As I am driving home, fighting the traffic, my cursing is less, perhaps from being too tired, but mainly from realising how lucky I am, working in a lovely environment and with a great group of people, who really spoil me. Also knowing that because of the hard, but fun work, we are able to help others. From every tree sold two dollars go to the “Pennies from Heaven” foundation.
Just a brief outline of what goes on at Jensen’s. All in a day’s work.
Karl Sorensen
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:10 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, October 03, 2013

Over-Wintering Herbs

1. Look for the most healthy plants to over-winter.
 
2. Rid your plants of insects and disease before bringing them in. Use Insecticidal soap or any organic product.  Make sure it is safe to use on edibles.  Isolate your plants for about 2 weeks from other houseplants before introducing them into the house to avoid spreading any insects and disease.
 
3. The best chance for success with some of the culinary herbs indoors for the winter is to start new plants from seed.  The best time to start seed is early August for herbs such as basil, chives, coriander, dill, parsley, marjoram, rosemary, sage, summer savory and thyme.  Plant in 4 inch pots using a medium of soil, sand, peat and perlite. Sink the pots into the garden up to their necks. Cover the seeds with sand or sphagnum moss.  Keep moist and fertilize with a liquid seaweed or a fish emulsion (Organique) when the sprouts are 3 inches high.  If you’ve missed the August sowing, start them any time indoors.
 
4. Other culinary herbs for indoors such as mint, oregano and French tarragon are best prepared by potting up root divisions after the harvest.  The optimum time to dig up the plants that you want to keep indoors is about a month before the first fall frost.  Bring in existing plants or make new ones by dividing them.  Capture as many of the roots as you can.  Mature plants, such as sweet marjoram, lavender and scented geraniums should be cut back by about 1/3 their full height to make them more manageable.  (You can cut them back even more drastically if the root ball is small.)  Put each one into a pot that is slightly larger than its roots.  Mint needs a lot of room so consider planting some in hanging baskets.  Fill in with a soil less growing mix.  Let the plants get settled in the pots in a lightly shaded outdoor location for a week or so.  Then move them into deeper shade for a week to get them ready to come indoors. Before frost arrives, bring tender herbs indoors to the window or light garden you’ve prepared.  
 
5. Let chives and garlic chives stay out through a month or so of cold before you bring them indoors.  They will grow much better indoors if they get a short winter to trick them into thinking it’s spring.  If conditions are right, they will re-sprout and provide you with some fragrant foliage to harvest in midwinter. 
 
6. Spearmint and tarragon will lose some leaves, but will perk up by February.  Keep them cool and dry until they re-sprout.  You can then begin to water and fertilize lightly every couple of weeks.
 
7. Other herbs to consider for inside gardening are aloe, bay tree, catnip, lavender, scented geraniums and lemon verbena.
 
8. When your herbs are grouped together indoors, they may be more susceptible to pest problems.  If you find whiteflies fluttering around the indoor herb garden, spray with Insecticidal soap or another organic product to kill mature flies and repeat until you get rid of newly hatched generations.
 
9. Red spider mites may attack because the humidity is low.  If so, use a pebble tray and fight them with insecticidal soap (Pebbles allow you to rest herb plants over – not in a tray of water.)  Avoid misting your plants to increase humidity as this will encourage insects and disease.  To discourage disease, remove dark, dead and sickly growth, and scrub your pruning shears or knife in a solution of 1 part bleach to 10 parts water between each cut.
 
10. The key to successfully growing herbs indoors is bright light.  A large window facing south is best, with an eastern exposure the next choice.  Bay, lemon balm and the other mints need only partial sun indoors and can be in east of west-facing windows.  If you cannot provide the necessary light but want herbs, consider investing in a grow-light unit.  This may be a simple fluorescent work light with 4 foot tubes, one warm and one cool-white, or two full-spectrum bulbs.  To be effective, fluorescent lights should be lit for at least 15 to 16 hours per day.
 
11. Most herbs need cool temperatures – in the 15 – 20 degree Celsius range during the day and cooler at night.  As well, good air circulation is important to reduce problems with fungus diseases.  Make sure air flows freely around the plants, but don’t put them in front of a heating vent.  It’s too hot and dry there.  Instead, invest in a small fan to gently keep the air moving.
 
12. Adjust the amount you fertilize to your light levels.  In a dark area where herbs struggle to stay alive, they may not need fertilizer at all.  In bright light where herbs are actively growing, you can fertilize every month.  Be sure to harvest fast-growing herbs often so they’ll stay compact.  You may want to replant crops that you use often so you will always have a fresh young plant to take the place of an older one.
 
13. You must also pay a bit more attention to the water and nutrient needs of your indoor plants.  Different herbs need different quantities of water when grown indoors.  Basil, parsley, mint, chervil and arugula do best if kept moist, not bone dry or soggy wet.  Let Mediterranean plants such as rosemary and lavender dry out slightly before you water again.  Too much water has probably killed more container-grown herbs than too little.  The plants shouldn’t sit in water, but instead, the water should evaporate up around them.  Because most of our homes are dry during the winter, increase the humidity around the plants by using a room or whole-house humidifier.  Alternatively, set the herbs on either commercially available trays that hold water and have raised racks for holding the pots, or on trays filled with pebbles.
 
14. When you wish spring would hurry up, spend some time nurturing your sage or lavender. 
Here is a list of plants that can thrive indoors, with recommended means of propagation.  This chart was compiled by Susan McClure and appears in her book The Herb Gardener:  A Guide for All Seasons.
 
Sow Seed Take Cuttings
 
Arugula Basil
Basil Mint
Chervil Oregano
Coriander/cilantr Pineapple sage
Dill         Rosemary
Mustard Sage
Parsley Scented Geraniums
Summer Savory Thyme
Sweet Marjoram
 
Bring in Mature Plants
 
Chives         Garlic Chives
Greek Oregano Lavender
Lemon Verbena Mint
Rosemary Sage
Scented Geraniums Summer Savory
Sweet Bay Sweet Marjoram
Thyme
 
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 6:29 PM 0 Comments

Monday, April 29, 2013

Slippery, Slimy Slugs, Yuck!

 This is the time of year our hearts and minds turn to gardening and the great outdoors!  We live in Winnipeg, wait 5 minutes and the weather will change!

Think of some of the problem areas of your garden instead and this is the time of year to deal with them. 

Slugs are slimy creatures resembling snails that come up from the ground at night and make holes in your beautiful plants (they really love hosta), leaving a slimy white trail in their wake.

If you have had a problem with slugs in a particular area of your garden, now is the time to get out the fan rake and lightly rake the soil.  In giving the area a light raking, it will bring up all the eggs the slugs have laid and you will be providing food for all the birds coming into your yard, while reducing the number of slugs.  Often times they love to lay their eggs all along a sidewalk or walkway so rake the soil lightly along these areas. Be careful not to compact the soil by walking on it.  Take a long board out to the garden area with you to use to walk on so as not to compact the soil by walking on it. To encourage birds into your garden area, place some drier lint out by a shrub or tree.  They will soon find it to help build their nests and will help rid your garden area of slugs at the same time. 

Here are a few more tips to rid your garden area of Slugs.

  1. Ammonia Spray:  Mix 1 part ammonia to 10 parts of water.  Spray on slugs in early morning or late at night when they like to come out and do their damage.  It does not hurt the plants; however, you should be careful not to spray everywhere as it will kill the good insects as well.
  2. Barrier method: Around the base of the plants under attack, right around the stem, use baby powder or talc which will stick to their gummy bodies.  They will not go through it, or, if they do, it will kill them eventually.  An inch of sand, the coarser the better, like a moat, the sharpness of the grains make it unpleasant to impassable for most slugs.  Copper bands apparently cause a shock to slugs.  This can be bought in a tape form at most garden centers.
  3. Boiling Water: In the very early spring pour boiling water along any hard edge that is in contact with the soil of the bed.  This would be like a sidewalk, fence or edging material including large stones or rocks.  This will kill the eggs.  This can be challenging if you have huge spaces that fit this definition.  Apply in areas where there is a lot of moisture or shade where you are having a serious snail colony problem.
  4. Egg Shells – Save your egg shells, break them up and add around the plants in your garden that are affected.  They will help cut their skin and they will tend to keep away from your plants.

 If your slug problems persist, drop into our garden center and pick up some slug bait to rid your garden of the nasty, slimy ones!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:55 AM 0 Comments

Friday, November 25, 2011

Sue's First Blog - by Sue the Other Sister!

Well, I decided it was time. It’s only been a year since my dear sister, Tammy asked me to write a blog. With my track record I figure I’m right on schedule. I can hardly believe that it’s time to make the switch from Landscaping to selling Christmas trees.

We’ve been having a lot of fun finishing the last few jobs. The last two weeks have been working at the Youth for Christ Building at Main and Higgins. It absolutely amazes me that you can have so many trades people, trucks and equipment on one site and nobody hits anything. This particular site being down town was the dreaded site of the year. Due to the lack of parking, vehicle and people traffic I was picturing this site as a nightmare. I was pleasantly surprised that everything when extremely well. The trades people and site supervisors have been amazing. All the different trades have worked together with efficiency and grace. There was not a day where I felt we were hindering someone else’s job. Everyone seemed to work together making sure that they were not undoing each other’s work.

We even got a few surprises. Shortly after remarking that I seemed to have a horseshoe stuck in a particular part of my body. This was said because everything on site fell into place just perfectly. From the tree delivery, soil drop offs to the excavator John who helped us out. Mark and Scott actually dug up an old Horseshoe. It looks like it may be from the early to mid 1900’s. It will soon be hanging above our garage door with hopes that it will continue to bring us all more luck.

Well as we wrap up our landscaping season another time is upon us. Yes it is here!!!! I’ve been waiting for this all year. IT’S FINALLY HERE, IT’S FINALLY HERE. It’s time for me to go from the hardhat, safety vest wearing Landscape Girl to...... CRAFT GIRL. Yes that’s right CRAFT GIRL. Instead of thinking about tree planting, semi loads of soil and mountains of Cedar Bark. My head in filling with designs for Outdoor Containers, Center Pieces, and Wreaths, and of course Bow making. So please come by with your containers or ideas and let us help you add some beauty to your Christmas.

Or stop by and pick out the perfect Fresh Christmas Tree. We have an amazing selection of Balsam Fir, Fraser Fir, Noble fir, Nordman Fir and some Manitoba Spruce. You can shop indoors, pick your tree and have us deliver it for free. ( within Winnipeg, Oak Bluff, Sanford or LaSalle )

Have a Happy Christmas Season!!!

Susan Jensen Stubbe
(The Other Sister)

Youth for Christ buiilding, Landscaping, Jensen Nursery and Landscaping
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 6:49 AM 1 Comments

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Gardening in busy times!

Well it is 9 pm sunday night. Most people are settled in for the night getting ready for the week. But when you are in the gardening business.........things work a little different! I thought I'd let you all dwell into a day in the life of a Jensen! I'm hoping my staff will all follow suit and do a blog about how it is to work at Jensen's!
 
I started my day off with a cup of coffee, a wish that I could stay where I was..... all snuggled up, and a drive across town to work. As usual I wasn't the first one there! After working 60 hour weeks for a while you tend to slow down! But once I get moving, watch out! Father's Day and Marathon day typically are a bit slow for us. Well apparently my website is working or something! Because after I decided I would fertilize every single basket and container pot...people started trailing in. So here I am in the middle of the greenhouse with about 150 baskets waiting for fertilizer on the ground! Nobody can get down the aisles, everyone wants help in a completely different area of the garden center! To sum it up CHAOS! So some how I fertilized every single annual basket and annual container, and put them back where they belong!

The rest of the day went fairly smooth! Because I was moving petunia baskets around I got all sticky and extremely dirty! So by the end of the day I looked like a mess! But believe it or not , sweat, dirt and all.........boy did I have fun!

So then, when it is time to go, what do I do? Sit down with my sister who I have not had time to talk with in days. So we catch up, on all the business matters we have not had time to deal with all week. Greenhouse talk, tree talk, watering system talk, how to deal with stress talk!etc. etc. etc! So then I go home..

 What do  I do then? Go out, cut my lawn, spray Killex for weeds, Round- Up in the area I want to turn into a patio for the swing and fire pit! Repot my flowers into a bigger ceramic pot adding torenia, and yellow sweet potatoe vine.

Finally  I crawl into my house...thank my daughter who has been busy cleaning my house for chore money. Spend some time catching up with my daughter, talking on the phone...it's off to bed I go! ...............

Off to bed I go! When I wake hopefully the sun is shining, the ferilizer kicked in, and all is happy! Tammy
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:59 PM 1 Comments