Monday, September 14, 2015

Tulips

Planting fall bulbs are a great way to bring blooms to your garden in the spring.  When choosing which ones to plant, try to mix all the blooming times - early, mid and late spring.  You can choose from tulips, daffodils, hyacinth, alliums and scilla.
The bulbs should be planted in a sunny location to receive at least 6 hours of sun.  But 8 - 10 hours would give you the best flowering.
They should be planted about 3 times as deep as the height of the bulb, but an inch or two deeper will give them extra protection.  You can add bulb fertilizer or bone meal at this time.  After blooming, remove the faded flowers so they don’t go to seed.  Let the foliage yellow and die back naturally so that energy goes back into the bulb for next year.
Naturalizing refers to a process by which you plant self-propagating bulbs in an informal setting.  They will require little or no human care, and will produce their own garden.

Tulips are probably the most popular fall bulb.  We have ordered five different types this year.

Darwin - are the longest living tulips with the largest flowers.
            - have tall, strong stems and strong petals that withstand wind and rain

Fosteriana - one of the earliest tulips to bloom
                  - have very wide flowers on strong stems

Lily flowering - blooms have pointed tips and very strong stems

Botanical - create a very natural look as they come from a wild species
                - some of the longest flowering tulips
                - a great choice for naturalizing

Double Peony - generally bloom in late spring with short, sturdy stems

There are other varieties of fall bulbs you can choose from.  Mixing these in to your tulip garden would be lovely.

Scilla - referred to as “glory of the snow”

         - bloom in very early spring and are extremely hardy
     - blooms usually last a few weeks
     - beautiful in a rock garden or in mass plantings

Muscari  - or Grape hyacinth
               - blooms last forever and are very fragrant
              - a shorter bloom to go in front of tulips
              - deer resistant

Trumpet Narcissus
- the most traditional daffodil
   - single stemmed, with big trumpets
      - deer resistant

Allium - belong to the onion family
      - easy to grow and long lived
         - deer resistant

It is a great time to do some planting - including fall bulbs.  Just when most everything in your garden is finished you can have some fun making a new spectacular spring garden.

Jennifer
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 3:57 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Garden Days - June 19th - 21st

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 Canada's Celebration of Gardens 
June 18-21, 2015

Garden Days is Canada’s coast to coast to coast, three-day celebration of our National Garden Day which is held annually on the Friday before Father’s Day.
 
 This three-day program of activities and events is for gardening enthusiasts, families, schools and tourists alike. Garden Days is an opportunity for Canadians to enjoy their own garden, visit or take part in their favourite garden experience, get inspired at their local garden centre or travel to a nearby destination to enjoy their favourite garden. 
 
Register Your Activity 
 
 All Canadian gardens, garden centres, garden and horticultural organizations and garden-related businesses are invited to organize activities or events to celebrate public gardens and home gardening. If you are organizing an activity in celebration of Garden Days, click on the ‘Register your Activity’ button at the top of the page and follow the simple prompts. 
 
Enter the ‘Canada’s Garden Street' Contest  by going to Gardendays.ca

 Kicked off with National Garden Day, always the Friday before Father’s Day, Garden Days is a three-day celebration that takes place over the Father’s Day weekend. The program’s objective is to draw attention to our cultural garden landscape, history and innovations and to underscore the importance of public and private gardens, the values of home gardening and the promotion of environmental stewardship. Garden Days is a joyful, country-wide celebration of the role of gardens in our communities and in our lives. We are offering an assortment of specials and workshops to celebrate "Garden Days"

$1 OFF ALL 1 G PERENNIALS

10 – 3 ½” PERENNIALS FOR $37.00

25% OFF – GIFTWARE

JEWELLERY

MINIATURES

WALL ART

EMPTY CONTAINERS & POTS

GNOMES

40% OFF – HANGING METAL LEAF TEALIGHTS & CANDLE HOLDERS

 

 
 
 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:48 PM 0 Comments

Monday, February 17, 2014

A look back at a day in life of Karl at Jensen's!

  All in a day’s work.
Jensen Nursery has been a contributor to the Scandinavian Centre for a number of years through advertising and donations of gift certificates to many events annually. To make this possible, I will like to give you an account of a traditional day at work, leading up to Christmas.
Christmas is getting close and I know, we will have a busy day at work selling Christmas trees. On the long drive to work I curse the City for the poor planning of road infrastructure and the poor drivers ahead of me, but look forward to a nice cup of coffee, waiting for me at work. When I finally arrive, I am greeted by a chilling look from Susan, my boss that says “you are finally here”. I steer directly to the lunch room for my coffee and stop dead in my tracks. “What, no coffee”, I yell. Jennifer enters the lunch room. “You want coffee, you make your own. We are too busy to bother with that,” She exclaims” Jean now enters with a big smile.”I’ll make the coffee for you and bring it to you when it is ready, go help the girls in the greenhouse. As I enter the greenhouse, Jennifer and Susan M. (Macpherson) are getting trees ready for delivery. “What took you so long? Give us a hand doing these fresh-cuts” she says, giving me a certain look. “You know I’m not much good till I’ve had my coffee” I explain. Just then, as if she has read my mind, Jean enters with a cup of coffee and I’m ready to go. With my coffee in my left hand and a saw in my right, I can now do a fresh-cut on the trees, only to hear my boss, Susan complaining. “You are cutting crooked, how can we make the tree stand straight with a cut like that” Looking at a pretty good cut I say defiantly,” Well if we had a good saw that could cut straight, you would have a perfect cut.”
As we continue getting the trees ready for delivery, the first customers of the day enter the greenhouse. This gives me a chance to finish my coffee and help the people at the same time, leaving the heavy work to Jennifer and the two Susan’s. It is not hard to sell a tree as we have a really nice selection and in no time at all I have made a sale. Now I just have to take it down from it’s hanging position. I swallow the last of my coffee and go to work, only to hear the girls yelling for me to come give them a hand. More costumers arrive and now we all rush to serve them. We blame this on Tammy, who has been busy advertising our services. Come in, bring your tree stand and pick your tree. We will then give it a fresh-cut, put it in the stand for you and send it out right into your living-room, and there for people are coming in droves buying their trees. 
Late in the morning Elsie arrives, bringing Kurt to work. Elsie doesn’t look too happy. “Keep him here the rest of the day,” she says, “I’m going to the Scandinavian Centre for the Norwegian lunch without him,” she says and off she goes. Kurt wanders around the greenhouse mumbling something only he understands and then disappears out to the garage. We are now close to noon and two more staff arrive, Laura and Jane. “Anything we can help with” they both ask and instead of replying we simply hand them tools to cut plastic with and point to the trees waiting to be wrapped. At this time the girls are noticing that I am slowing down. “Don’t lift the trees by yourself, let me help you. You are getting too old to do it by yourself,” Susan M says and the other girls soon follow suit. Looking like my pride has been hurt, I manage to hide my pleasure of being pampered.
It is now one o’clock and I have to teach a group of ladies how to make wreaths. Another staff member, Arlene will teach another group to make center pieces. This gives me a break from the hustle and bustle in the greenhouse, but Jean soon lets me know that I am needed there as well, so back and forth I go. The end of the day is nearing and Elsie returns from the Centre, this time with a smile on her face from having a nice visit with friends from the Centre. Kurt has come back from the garage and has wandered around the greenhouse, mumbling his own language. He too now has a smile on his face. He has been counting the trees and learned how many we have sold in the course of the day and he is pleased. Everybody is exhausted from the day’s work but already they are discussing the plans for the next day.
As I am driving home, fighting the traffic, my cursing is less, perhaps from being too tired, but mainly from realising how lucky I am, working in a lovely environment and with a great group of people, who really spoil me. Also knowing that because of the hard, but fun work, we are able to help others. From every tree sold two dollars go to the “Pennies from Heaven” foundation.
Just a brief outline of what goes on at Jensen’s. All in a day’s work.
Karl Sorensen
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:10 PM 0 Comments

Monday, February 10, 2014

Making Sense of Hydrangeas

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I know exactly what you have been worried about. Last summer I know it was worrying me. Then……Colleen Zacharias gave a seminar last September about …..Hydrangeas. And I took notes:
 
There are three types of Hydrangeas.
 
Arborescens, which is also commonly known as a mop head, has large round flower clusters. They bloom on new wood and should be pruned in late fall or early spring. The most well known is Annabelle, which can be pruned to 6” in the spring of its third year. 
 
The second type is Paniculata - Limelight and Quick Fire - which has a cone shaped flower cluster. It is the easiest to grow and also blooms on new wood. You can also prune this one in late fall or early spring. The Quick Fire Hydrangea is great for gardens as it blooms one month earlier than other Hydrangeas.
 
The third type is Macrophylla - Endless Summer - which is known for the large leaves. It blooms on new and old wood. This type, especially, doesn’t like the afternoon sun and must not be pruned. 
 
It’s important to consider the following guidelines when growing Hydrangeas. They need three deep waterings a week with a weak fertilizer mix. Most varieties need afternoon shade and they should all be mulched. 
 
Stop by and see us in the spring and check out all the varieties that we have at Jensen’s.
 
Now your worrying is over,
Jennifer

FIRE AND ICE HYDRANGEA

BELLA ANNA HYDRANGEA

 
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:15 AM 0 Comments

Friday, August 30, 2013

Wasps bothering you?

Are you being bothered by Wasps?

I was in to the greenhouse the other day when I spotted a few things that we carry to rid your outdoor patio area and yard of wasps. The wasps are starting to appear already and never at an opportune moment. Just when we’re about to sit down for a nice meal on the patio or enjoy a drink outside, there they are. Many people are allergic to yellowjacket stings so must always be on guard.
Jensen’s carries Doktor Doom that will kill wasps, mosquitoes, house flies and many other insects as well as ants and bed bugs! I understand it has also proven effective on the dreaded Lily Beetle.
We carry yellowjacket traps that are non-toxic. They come complete with an attractant. You just add water and hang. There are no killing agents, the insects die naturally. The traps catch ten yellowjacket species, but will not trap beneficial honeybees.
We also carry the Waspinator, a durable, weatherproof device that resembles a wasp nest. It acts like a scarecrow for wasps – other wasps see it as an enemy nest and avoid the area. It can be left out year-round in any weather. No harmful chemicals, no dead wasps to clean up, no maintenance, and no more wasps!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 2:20 PM 0 Comments

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Keeping Your Plants Healthy!

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Make Your Life Easy by Keeping Your Plants Healthy! If you’re wondering why some of your plants are just not performing the way you expected, maybe it’s because they are starving! Keep in mind the plants you purchase from most garden centres are grown in a soil less mix. It has little to no nutrient value as it is composed mainly of peat moss, perlite and possibly some vermiculite. If you’re not into composting, try using a fertilizer that is 100% organic. Jensen’s carries a fabulous line of organic fertilizers made by Orgunique, a trademark of BioFert a Canadian company out of Langley, B.C. Orgunique provides a 100% organic and chemical-free gardening choice to help build greener and healthier gardens. The General Purpose Fertilizer 2.5-2-5 is a 100% organic liquid product that offers an environmentally friendly alternative to your gardening needs and helps keep your plants looking vibrant and fresh. It can be used on all indoor and outdoor plants including fruits, vegetables and ornamentals, etc. The Rose and Flower Food 2-3-5 is a 100% organic product that is formulated to meet nutritional requirements of flowering plants in your garden. The product is easy to use and will keep your flowering plants fresh and blooming. Rose and Flower Food 2-3-5 can be used for bedding plants, hanging baskets, potted plants and flowering shrubs. Rose growers successfully combat powdery mildew and other fungal diseases by spraying roses with a solution of 3 Tablespoons of baking soda in a gallon of water. Tip – Never spray your plants when the sun is shining on the leaves as this may promote leaf burn. Orgunique’s House Plant Food 2-1-3 is the way to go if you are concerned about exposing your home to chemicals. Unlike chemical fertilizers, it fulfills all nutritional requirements in a natural way. It is 100% organic liquid fertilizer ideal for feeding houseplants and patio plants. It brings rich foliage and bright colour to all houseplants. Kelp Boost is another great product to try and is a supplement to be used along with plant food. It is a 100% organic emulsion made from highest grade Atlantic Kelp. It is an ideal plant supplement that provides vigour and boosts all stages of plant development. As a spray, all you have to do is mix 3-4 tsp. (15-20 ml) in 1 litre of water and spray once every 10 – 15 days or so, or apply 2 – 3 tsp. in 1 litre of water and water it in at the root zone. Apply to wet ground. Tip – Always ensure your plants are well-watered before you fertilize to avoid any burning of leaves. Arlene Ortiz (Wheeler)
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Friday, June 21, 2013

Jensen's School Program with Arlene Wheeler!

AAAAAAAAAAaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh Summer!!!!!! I’ve just completed the Jensen School program for this year. It ran from the beginning of April until the middle of June. I attended many different schools across the city and have taught over 2,000 children. Many thanks to the people who dropped off their empty containers for me!!! (Jensen’s supplied containers, soil and plants for the children!!!). I have had such a great time teaching gardening to all the children and the teachers and have had many wonderful and crazy experiences along the way. One morning while crossing the street to a school off Pembina Highway, I was stopped by 2 of Winnipeg’s boys in blue. They asked me if I was taking Mariuana plants to the school and then, they laughed their heads off. I had a tray of beans on my cart! We all had a great laugh! We have some wonderful, caring teachers with a lot of heart and there are many, many, many great kids out there. I feel so fortunate to have been able to meet so many of them, share some of my gardening tips and tricks and gardening riddles and be part of their world for a short time. I’ve enjoyed so many different renditions of our national anthem and it always warmed my heart when, after I had finished a class, so many children came up and gave me a big hug, even the challenging ones the teachers thought were not paying attention!. I remember finishing one class of grade one students at Sister MacNamara school right down in the core area. There was one of the cutest little girls standing in front of me when we finished and she said “I just have to do this”, and she gave me one of the biggest hugs. I’ve shed many a tear at school. Jensen’s and I have received so many thank you cards from the teachers and the children and I really would like to share some of these thank you messages with you. The children are precious; I’m not going to change a word of what they wrote. Enjoy! Thank you Ms Wheeler for coming to are school and thank you for the flowers. I like your rittles. Thank you from Peyton. I like the marigold. I learned about Jensen Nursery. I loved the riddles. Thank you Jensen Nursery and Ms. Wheeler. From Abby Thank you very much! I like my flower. I named my flower Bella. She is so cute and thank you for the flower and the coupon. From Sierra Thank you Mrs. Wheeler for teaching about the plants. I never new there were so many plants. You are awesome and thank you for the plants. They are awesome. I lernd about plants you are so so awesome at plants. Thank you from Whay Thank you for coming to our class. I really liked the riddles. I definetlay will give my tomatos some calcium! Thanks for coming from Alexander Thank you Mrs. Wheeler. You shod us cool ridels and at the same time tetcht us about flowers and vegtibals and we also maid a flower. It was great as am you. You techt us in a fun way. I lernd ridels. I was the girl in the pink sweter. From Roxy Thank you Mrs. Wheeler for coming and talking to us about plants! Ava Bishop and I were super happy with the plants you gave us! And agin tank you very much ok and I like your Nike shoes! Thank you Mrs. Wheeler for warming up our brains. From Bishep I learned that potatos have eyes but I thought it was freeky. From Tristan Thank you Mrs. Wheeler and Jensen Nurseries for letting us plant our own Marigolds! And for giving us a coupon for free seeds. I’m going to try to plant a flower in a recycling box and I’m going to water my Marigold every time I can!!! Thank you from Audrey. Thank you. I liked the jokes you told us. I learnd about plants that I didn’t know about. Thank you by Andrew Thank you for the coupon and the riddles and the advise for planting flowers, and food. Marilgold yeah, thank you for teaching me about planting stuff. Maybe I will come and visit you. Bye by Kaeluna Thank you I lernd a lot. And I had fun and I hope I see y agene. From Zack Thanks Mrs. Wheeler. I loved learning about plants. I lerned that marigolds come in different colours. I also learned that there are plants that only need to be planted once. Thank you from Hannah the girl at the end of the table with the crazy hair. I’m sitting here thinking how lucky I am!!! Thank you Kurt, Elsie, Tammy and Susan for giving so much back to the community and for allowing me to experience so many happy times that other people only dream of. Happy summer!!! By Arlene Ortiz (Wheeler)
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 5:37 PM 0 Comments

Monday, February 11, 2013

Hot and New Plants 2013

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What’s Hot & What’s New 2013
Jensen Nursery & Landscaping Ltd.
 

Tropical's/Elephant Ear persian palm, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center, Winnipeg, Manitoba

Persian Palm
Alocasia  x ‘Calidora’  
4-6high &  2-3ft wide   
part sun – shade, wet
Deer resistant

Buddha’s Palm
Alocasia cuculata ‘Buddha Palm’
2-4 ft high & 1-2ft wide
part sun – shade, wet
Deer resistant

Borneo Giant Upright Elephant Ears
Alocasia macrorrhiza 'Borneo Giant' 
7 - 10ft high & 4 - 5ft wide
part sun – shade, wet
Deer resistant Elephant Ears Black Ruffle, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center, Winnipeg, manitoba

Purple Upright Elephant Ears
Alocasia plumbae ‘Nigra’
4-5 ft high 2-3ft wide
part sun – shade, wet
Deer resistant

Black Ruffles Elephant Ears
Colocasia esculenta ‘Black Ruffles’
4 - 5 ft high & 3 - 4 ft wide
sun to part shade, wet
Deer resistant

Elena Elephant Ears
Colocasia esculenta 'Elena'
24 - 36" high & 24 - 36“wide
sun to part shade , wet
Deer resistant banana Plant Zebrina, Winnipeg, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center

Mojito Elephant Ears
Colocasia esculenta ‘Mojito'
4 - 6 ft high & 3 - 4ft wide
sun to part shade, wet
Deer resistant

Thailand Giant Elephant Ears
Colocasia gigantea ‘Thailand Giant’
7-9ft high & 4 - 5ft wide
sun to part shade, wet
Deer resistant
False Banana Plant
Ensete maurelii
5 - 6ft high & 4 - 5ft wide
sun to part shade, average

False Green Banana Plant
Ensete superbum
Grows 5-6 ft tallPansy Purple Rain, Winniepg, Manitoba, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center
bright green foliage
Full sun

False Banana Plant
Ensete glaucum
6-8 ft high
Bluish green leaves.
Full sun

Basjoo Banana Plant
Musa x ‘Basjoo’
very tough Banana Plant
8-10 ft high 4-5 ft wide
Full sun

Margarita Banana Plant
Musa x ‘Margarita’
Fast growing classic Banana look
Lime green foliage
6-8 ft high, part sun

Zebrina Banana Plant Canna Bird of Paradise, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center, Winnipeg, manitoba
Musa sumatrana 'Zebrina'
5 - 6ft high & 4 - 5ft wide
sun to part shade

Poquito Banana Plant
Musa x ‘Poquito’
3-4 ft high and 2-3ft wide
Bright green lush foliage
Part to full sun

Hybrid Begonia
18 - 20" high & 18 - 20“ wide
part sun – shade
Silver, purple and green variegation

Plum Paisley Begonia
Begonia ‘Plum Paisley’
12-15" high & 12-15” wide
part sun - shade
Deep variegated leaves with dark green, white to plum margins

Canna Bird of Paridise
5-6high & 2 - 3ft wide
sun to part shade
Blue green leaves, pink flowers

Australia Red Canna canna Erebus, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center, Winnipeg, manitoba
5-6ft high & 2 - 3ft wide
sun to part shade
Purple Reddish foliage, red flowers

Intrigue Canna
5-6 ft high & 2 - 3ft wide
sun to part shade
Narrow purple leaves, orange flowers

Erebus Canna
3-4 ft high & 2 - 3ft wide
sun to part shade
Green leaves, salmon pink flowers

Ermine Canna
3-4 ft high & 2 - 3ft wide
sun to part shade
Green leaves, pure white flowers

Canna Ra
5-6high & 2 - 3ft wide Kint Tut Grass, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center , Winnipeg, manitoba
sun to part shade
Green leaves, bright yellow flowers


Grasses

Red Star Palm Grass
Cordyline australis 'Red Star'
24 - 30" high & 15 - 18" side
sun to part shade, dry
Deer resistant

Burgundy Design a Line Palm Grass
Cordyline x ‘Design a line burgundy’
Burgundy foliage that forms a tight clump
2-3 ft high
Part to full sun

Baby Tut Graceful Grass
Cyperus involucratus 'Baby Tut'
18 - 24" high & 14 - 20" wideFireworks Fountain Grass, Jensen Nurserya nd Garden Center, Winnipeg, Manitoba
sun to part shade
Can be used in ponds

King Tut Graceful Grass
Cyperus papyrus 'King Tut'
48 - 72" high & 36 - 48" wide
sun to part shade
Can be used in ponds

Fireworks Fountain Grass
18-24” high & side
Sun or part shade

Princess Fountain Grass
Pennisetum x ‘Princess’
Beautiful purple color of the Purple Fountain Grass 
but has a wider leave to give a more textured look.
Vigorous growing to 3 ft
New zEALAND fLAX, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center, Winnipeg, manitoba
Vertigo Millet
Pennisetum x ‘Vertigo’
Thicker blade, better dark purple coloring.
3-4 ft high Full sun

Toffee Twist Grass
Carex flagellifera
18 - 24" high & 15 - 18" wide
sun to part shade

Assorted
Bronze New Zealand Flax
Phormium tenax atropurpureum
Very tough
Grows 4-5ft high
Full sun, deer resistant

Senorita Rosalita Cleome
Cleome Hybrid Regal Geranium baroness, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center, Winnipeg, Manitoba,
24 - 36" high & 14 - 20“ wide
sun to part shade
Deer Resistant, Butterflies

Gaura
15 - 18" high & 12 - 15“wide
sun to part shade

Coleus
Solenostemon scutellarioides
18 - 24" high & 12 - 15" wide
sun to shade
Deer Resistant, hummingbird

Coleus Marooned
24-36 inchesColeus EI brighto, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Sun or Shade

Keystone Copper Coleus
24-36 inches
Sun or Shade

El Brighto Coleus
24-36 inches
Sun or Shade

Merlin’s Magic  Coleus
10-12” high
Sun or shade

Wasabi Coleus
24-30 inches
Sun or Shade
/begonia plum paisle., jensen Nursery and Garden Center, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Sun Impatiens
Sun or Shade, hot dry, windy areas, will take frost
- 24-36” high and 18-24” spread
Compact Coral
Compact Magenta
Compact Orange
Compact Pink Blush

Garnet Lace Ipomoea
6-8” high and spreads to 36”
Bronze red foliage

Sweet Carolyn Bewitched Ipomoea
6-8” high and trails to 24”
Dark purple foliage

Picasso in Pink Supertunia
More compact then Pretty much Picasso
10-12” high and trails 36”coolwave pansy, jensen nursery andgarden center, winnipeg, manitoba

Pink Lemonade Suncatcher Petunia
Soft yellow petunia with pink tones
Excellent on containers

Inspired by the wave petunia line
Grows 8-10” high but spreads to 2ft
Excellent in baskets

Violet Wing Pansy

Purple Rain Pansy Cool Wave
Dark purple, cascading pansy
Will trail 18-24”

Asparagus Fern
Vigorous growing from 2-3 ft long
Excellent in mixed containers
Full to part sun

Luna Red Hibiscus
Shrub like, grows 2-3 ft high
Deep red flowers all summer/MinalobataJungleQueen, Jensen Nursery and Garden Center, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Full sun, tolerates a wet area

Mina Jungle Queen
Full sun vine
Yellow and red flowers
vigorous

Solanum Jasminoides White
Potato Vine
Fragrant white flowers, very vigorous, need support
Part sun

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:10 PM 0 Comments

Tuesday, February 05, 2013

School Gardening Program

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The Days Are Getting Longer!!!!!

The days are getting longer and spring will soon be around the corner.  I have been getting a number of calls and emails from teachers regarding our School Program.  It was a huge success last year and with the calls and emails I have been receiving, it looks like it will be another great year.  Jensen’s is a great supporter of the community and as such, supplies soil, containers, seedlings for the children to plant and a coupon for each child so they are able to drop in to Jensen’s for a free package of vegetable seeds or seedlings.  I go into the classroom, talk about gardening basics, container gardening, basic plant care and what plants give us.  I also have a number of gardening jokes and riddles for the children to solve.  We have a lot of fun.  I have taught children from daycare level to grade 6.
I have been teaching children’s gardening for over 18 years and have experienced first hand what gardening teaches children.  It teaches patience; respect of property; a greater respect for all living and growing things and it creates a greater sense of pride when they are able to create beauty or see something growing that they have planted or cared for.  Gardening also gets us outside for some much needed fresh air and exercise after being in so much over the winter. Gardening is very therapeutic and great for the soul!
If you are a teacher or teacher’s friend, please contact us as soon as possible so we can plan a date and time to come out to spread the good word about gardening!

Arlene Wheeler
Arlene@jensennursery.com
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 10:23 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Arlene's Information on Garden Clubs and Societies in Manitoba

ARLENE’S INFORMATION ON GARDEN CLUBS AND SOCIETIES IN MANITOBA

I encourage all gardeners out there to hunt down a Garden Club or Society in your area and get out and enjoy the different programs available.  Over the winter months it’s so nice to get together with people that share your love of gardening.  Many of the Clubs offer workshops, seminars, junior gardener programs, garden tours, many knowledgeable and interesting speakers, and more.  I was with the East Kildonan Garden Club for many years and developed some great friendships with some wonderful, experienced gardeners willing to share their vast gardening expertise.  Gardeners are a special group of people. They always want to share and help all gardeners, especially those new to the gardening scene, that feel they know nothing when it comes to gardening.  The experienced gardener recognizes that they knew little when they started out.  Being involved with the Garden Club really added to my gardening knowledge and added much enjoyment in my life.

Some Clubs operate under the umbrella of the Manitoba Horticultural Association (M.H.A.) Other Clubs and Societies stand on their own. The M.H.A., a non-profit organization, established in 1895, promotes interest in horticulture and acts as a source of information to Association members and to the general public. The M.H.A. is holding their 115th Annual Convention in Brandon, January 17th, 18th and 19th, 2013 (a great winter retreat for gardeners).  They are offering some very interesting speakers and topics. Stefan Fediuk, Landscape Architect from the City of Windsor and formerly of the City of Winnipeg, will be speaking on Creating a Personal Paradise in the Garden; Lew and Tammy Wallace from Minnesota will be doing a demonstration on Arranging with Glads. They do a fabulous job.  Many of you will have seen their work displayed at St Vital Mall over the years, with the Glad and Dahlia flower show.  There are many other great guest speakers and topics such as Container Gardening With Herbs, Cacti and Succulents, Growing Tropicals in your Garden, Iris – the Median Alternative by the very experienced Barb Jackson.  Everyone will be wanting to here from Duayne Friesen from Ball Superior on “What’s New for 2013”.  There are many other interesting speakers as well.  Registration is on the Thursday with guest speakers continuing throughout the day on the Friday and Saturday. There will be a Banquet and Gardeners Auction on the Friday that is always a lot of fun. The cost is very reasonable and is a nice get-away in the middle of January. 
Check out the I Can Garden Website, www.icangarden.com/clubs/mha for more information on the Convention and a garden club near you or you can email the M.H.A. directly at www.m.h.a.@shaw.ca. There are 23 Garden Clubs and Societies under the M.H.A..

Following is a list of clubs that are not under the umbrella of the M.H.A.:

Steinbach & Area Garden Club
Gimli Garden Club
Friends of Gardens Manitoba (formerly Friends of the Conservatory)

Herb Society of Manitoba
Manitoba Orchid Society
The Manitoba Regional Lily Society
Bonsai Society of Winnipeg
Friends of the Beausejour Daylily Gardens
Landscape Manitoba
Manitoba Forage Seed Association
Manitoba People and Plants
Swan Valley Garden Club
Tent Town Garden Club

A lot of the club information can be found on the events calendar on the I Can Garden Web-site.

The Master Gardeners site also has club information, www.mgmanitoba.com/resources/garden-clubs-news.

If all else fails and you still need information on finding a club, please email me at  info@jensens.com and I will put you in touch with a great club near you!

Don’t forget to check out the Jensen Web-site for information on Gardening Seminars and Christmas Craft Classes in the up-coming months!



Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:41 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Arlene's Lasagna Gardening Tips

Arlene’s Lasagna Gardening Tips

This is the time of year to take advantage of all the Carbon sources around to create a vegetable garden or flower bed without having to break your back doing it. It’s easy – no digging or tilling!  You’ll also be able to use all the compostable items from your yard and kitchen   NO meat or dairy please!!!
Lasagna gardening or sheet composting is an organic gardening method that results in fluffy, rich soil, with very little work. You are going to build a garden by layering nitrogen and carbon sources, similar to creating Lasagna.

Nitrogen sources:  grass clippings used coffee grounds
(Greens) used tea leaves or bags fruit & vegetable scraps
fresh weeds (no seeds) blood meal
alfalfa pellets composted manures

Carbon sources: leaves sawdust
(Browns) corn stalks (cut up) pine needles
peat moss straw
wood chips newspaper
cardboard shredded bark
dryer lint

To create a garden or flower bed, mow the grass or other vegetation as short as possible.  Loosen the soil underneath with a spading fork.  Remove the weeds.  Cover the area with 4 – 6 overlapping layers of newspaper or cardboard.  Wet the area thoroughly. Fill in the area with layers of Nitrogen materials (Greens) and Carbon materials (Browns), ending with Browns, to a minimum of about 18 inches in height. Ending with a Carbon layer discourages flies from laying eggs in the nitrogen, such as the kitchen scraps and composted manure, however, you will be creating an attractive playground for the earthworms to loosen up the soil as they tunnel through it.  To speed up the composting process, sprinkle the layers with a Compost Accelerator, as there is little or no heat reaction from the microorganisms to speed the process along. Cover with about 4 – 6 inches of a 4-way garden mix. By the time spring rolls around, the garden will be ready for planting.  The layers will have decomposed and it will look and smell like fresh earth. There will be no need for fertilizer next year!!!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 4:01 PM 0 Comments

Thursday, October 11, 2012

ARLENE’S TIPS ON FALL ROSE CARE

ARLENE’S TIPS ON FALL ROSE CARE

1. DON’T PRUNE ROSES IN THE FALL IN OUR ZONE – LET THE ROSES
FORM ROSEHIPS AND PREPARE FOR WINTER.
2. FOR HARDY ROSES – YOU REALLY DON’T HAVE TO DO ANYTHING, AS THEY ARE HARDY FOR OUR ZONE AND SHOULD SURVIVE THE WINTER, WITHOUT EXTRA PROTECTION.  
       IF YOU ARE CONCERNED ABOUT A NEWLY PLANTED ROSE, USE
      FLAX STRAW TO COVER IT AFTER THEY IT HAS GONE INTO
      DORMANCY.
3. FOR CLIMBING ROSES – TIE THE CANES WITH SOMETHING SUCH AS
      PANTY HOSE TO KEEP THEM FROM WHIPPING AROUND IN THE
      WIND.
4.  FOR TEA ROSES
a. THESE ARE THE ONLY ONES YOU SHOULD PRUNE IN THE FALL OR
    BEND THE CANES AND COVER, IN OUR ZONE.

b. DON’T PRUNE AND COVER, JUST TO GET IT DONE, UNTIL THE 
    COLD WEATHER HAS REALLY SET IN.

c. AFTER PRUNING BACK TO ABOUT 12 INCHES, SPRAY WITH A
    FUNGICIDE/INSECTICIDE OR SPRINKLE WITH GARDEN SULPHUR.

d. COVER THE ROSE WITH 6 – 8 INCHES OF DRY SOIL OR LEAVES.

e. PROTECT IT WITH A ROSE CONE, CARDBOARD BOX OR CONTAINER
   (NOT PLASTIC AS PLASTIC DRAWS THE COLD).  PROTECT IT FROM
    THE SUN, AS SOON AS THE FROST HAS GOT AT IT AND BEFORE IT
    HAS A CHANCE TO THAW OUT.  IT’S THE FREEZING AND THAWING
    THAT DOES THE MOST HARM.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:46 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, October 11, 2012

ARLENE’S TIPS ON OVER-WINTERING CANNAS

ARLENE’S TIPS ON OVER-WINTERING CANNAS

1. DIG THE CANNAS AFTER THE TOPS HAVE BEEN KILLED BY FROST.
2. CUT THE STALK TO ABOUT 4 INCHES AND RE-POT.
3. STORE THEM IN A COOL SPOT (ABOUT 50 DEGREES).

OR

1. DIG THEM UP AFTER THE TOPS HAVE BEEN KILLED BY FROST.

2. REMOVE FOLIAGE.

3. ALLOW CANNA RHIZOMES TO DRY FOR A FEW DAYS WHERE THEY WON’T FREEZE.

4. STORE THEM IN A PLASTIC BAG WITH DAMPENED PEAT MOSS – POKE HOLES IN THE BAG FOR AERATION.

5. STORE THEM IN A DARK, COOL PLACE ( ABOUT 50 DEGREES).

6. CHECK EVERY MONTH THROUGH THE WINTER TO INSURE THE PEAT MOSS HAS NOT DRIED OUT.  USE A MISTER TO DAMPEN THE PEAT MOSS, IF NECESSARY.  KEEP IN MIND THAT TOO MUCH MOISTURE WILL ROT THE RHIZOME.

7. RE-POT THEM IN EARLY MARCH AND MOVE INTO A SUNNY LOCATION BEFORE PLANTING THEM OUTSIDE AFTER THE THREAT OF FROST.
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 7:42 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Container Gardening by Arlene


Arlene’s Container Gardening Tips

Container gardening can be a lot of fun and very rewarding. Here are some tips I’ve gathered through the years to be successful:

Choosing the right container

SIZE MATTERS!!!

TIP - Choose a container that is at least 12” in diameter. Smaller containers dry out very quickly in hot weather. The container must also have drainage holes to allow for moisture to drain out if over-watering occurs or if they are out in rain.

There are many different containers to choose from to hang or place on the ground. There are wire baskets with a coco liner or lined with sphagnum moss; plastic, fiberglass, self-watering; glazed, terra cotta, metal and wooden containers.
TIP - When using clay or terra cotta, soak the container in a tub of water until the air bubbles subside before you pot them up, to avoid drying out the soil. Also, place a saucer of water underneath to keep them moist.
TIP – When using baskets lined with either a coco liner or sphagnum, put a plastic liner punched with holes, over-top of the coco or sphagnum liner and then plant your plants. The basket will not dry out so quickly.

Darker coloured containers attract the heat more than lighter coloured ones, so keep that in mind if you plan on spending weekends away. Use light coloured containers for the sunny spots.

Choosing the right soil

A peat based soil less mix dries out more quickly than a quality potting soil. Choose a quality potting soil specific for containers or hanging baskets that contain key nutrients. Consider using a product such as Soil Moist that contains water crystals that hold water and release it into the soil as it dries. Soil Moist is added to the soil before you plant. Add compost to enrich your soil.
TIP – Don’t use soil from the garden as it will compact, be heavy and may contain insect or disease.

Choosing the right plants

Choose the right plants for the conditions (sun or shade). If you get away on the weekends and have your hanging baskets or containers in hot dry sun, choose annuals such as Geraniums, Strawflower, Portulaca, Million bells, Osteospermum, Cosmos, Lantana. Scaevola, Marigolds, Heliotrope, Salvia, Celosia, Verbena, Gazania, Ice Plant, or Castor Bean, to name a few, that will tolerate a lot of hot and dry.

Keeping your plants healthy

Fertilizing
Add compost to enrich the soil before you plant or use a slow release fertilizer that breaks down with heat and moisture.  Some slow release fertilizers last for up to four months.  If you haven’t improved the soil, you may also want to use a water soluble fertilizer or an organic fertilizer such as sea weed or fish emulsion to supplement until the slow release fertilizer starts breaking down.

Deadheading
Remove the spent flowers by removing the flower head right back to the stem to keep the plant from going to seed.

Checking for insects and disease
Check for insects and disease regularly and deal with the problem immediately before the plants gets stressed or destroyed.

Watering
Water your hanging baskets or containers slowly to insure the entire container is moist.  For hanging baskets, you may want to submerge the basket in a bucket of water until air bubbles subside. This way you know the basket is very well watered.
TIP – The feeder roots will gravitate to the outside of the container so make sure the soil at the edges of the container is well watered.
Water bulbs are available to fill and leave in your container when you are away.  I have also filled 2 litre plastic bottles, punched a few holes in them and turned them upside down in a large to container to drip water slowly into the soil when I am away for a few days.

Mulching
The use of mulch in containers also helps keep in moisture and keep the soil cool.

TIP – if you are going to be away for a number of days and are not able to have someone come in to water while you are away, you might consider moving smaller baskets and containers inside or into a shady, sheltered area outside to keep them from drying out in the hot sun.

TIP – If you have planted perennials or shrubs in containers for the summer, make sure you remove them from the container and get them planted into the ground by the middle to the end of September to insure they settle in before winter.

These are some tips that I have used over the years to keep my hanging baskets and containers looking in top shape all summer long!  If you keep your plants healthy, they will be able to survive on their own through periods of both drought and a lot of rain!

Posted by Tammy Jensen at 1:24 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Well, this is the time for planting – finally!!!



We must remember to get our plants ready for the great outdoors where they will be subject to the elements of the season.  Most plants at many greenhouses and different places have been babied and have not been used to the wind and the direct sun. To make sure your plants are going to survive and be healthy and strong, put them first in a shady, sheltered area and then gradually move them into the sun and the wind for a few hours at a time.  You may have to do this for a few days before planting them out into the garden area or will they will eventually call home.  They will need a lot of water for the first while they are out so they don’t dry out and get stressed.  If they look wilted or the leaves become white (scorched by the sun), give them a good drink and move them back into a sheltered, shady area for a few hours before you move them back out again to where they will be planted.  If you have already planted them out into the garden area, you may have to shelter them from the hot sun and wind by using sheets, newspaper or cardboard boxes to cover them.  Plant out your sun plants first and then your shade plants.  If the temperature drops below 10 degrees at night, your shade plants may suffer and become stressed, so if you have a lot of planting to do, leave your shade plants until the temperature at night is 10 degrees or higher.  If you are planting your containers, the ideal time to plant is in the early evening.  They will then get the rest of the night to settle in before the hot, windy conditions of the day.  For the first week, just make sure everything is well watered and then after the first week once they are settled in, start your fertilizing program.  Most plants purchased have little to no food in the soil less mix they are grown in, so you must improve the soil with compost or fertilizer of some kind.  For blooming plants, I recommend a water soluble fertilizer with a high middle number to encourage bloom.  Miracle Gro 15-30-15 is a good one to use.  A fertilizer too high in nitrogen, the first number will encourage a lot of leaf, but little bloom.  If you follow this simple plan, you will have strong, healthy plants that will ward off a lot of insects and give you a lot of bloom throughout the rest of the summer!
Arlene Wheeler
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 8:03 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Gardening Saturday 2012 -This Saturday!!!! See you there!

 
gardening Saturday 2012



GARDENING SATURDAY - MORE INFORMATION


Come and see our booth #5 and #6 at Gardening Saturday on March 31, 2012. Arlene from Jensen's will be holding a seminar on gardening with kids. Bring the kids down and give them a chance to do a bit of planting! Call 895-4560 to book, or go online to www. gardensmanitoba.com to register. We will be having free demonstrations at our booth at 11 am and 2 pm! Hope to see you all there!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Gardening in busy times!

Well it is 9 pm sunday night. Most people are settled in for the night getting ready for the week. But when you are in the gardening business.........things work a little different! I thought I'd let you all dwell into a day in the life of a Jensen! I'm hoping my staff will all follow suit and do a blog about how it is to work at Jensen's!
 
I started my day off with a cup of coffee, a wish that I could stay where I was..... all snuggled up, and a drive across town to work. As usual I wasn't the first one there! After working 60 hour weeks for a while you tend to slow down! But once I get moving, watch out! Father's Day and Marathon day typically are a bit slow for us. Well apparently my website is working or something! Because after I decided I would fertilize every single basket and container pot...people started trailing in. So here I am in the middle of the greenhouse with about 150 baskets waiting for fertilizer on the ground! Nobody can get down the aisles, everyone wants help in a completely different area of the garden center! To sum it up CHAOS! So some how I fertilized every single annual basket and annual container, and put them back where they belong!

The rest of the day went fairly smooth! Because I was moving petunia baskets around I got all sticky and extremely dirty! So by the end of the day I looked like a mess! But believe it or not , sweat, dirt and all.........boy did I have fun!

So then, when it is time to go, what do I do? Sit down with my sister who I have not had time to talk with in days. So we catch up, on all the business matters we have not had time to deal with all week. Greenhouse talk, tree talk, watering system talk, how to deal with stress talk!etc. etc. etc! So then I go home..

 What do  I do then? Go out, cut my lawn, spray Killex for weeds, Round- Up in the area I want to turn into a patio for the swing and fire pit! Repot my flowers into a bigger ceramic pot adding torenia, and yellow sweet potatoe vine.

Finally  I crawl into my house...thank my daughter who has been busy cleaning my house for chore money. Spend some time catching up with my daughter, talking on the phone...it's off to bed I go! ...............

Off to bed I go! When I wake hopefully the sun is shining, the ferilizer kicked in, and all is happy! Tammy
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 9:59 PM 1 Comments

Wednesday, March 09, 2011

Proven Winners Annuals being planted in our greenhouse!

GREENHOUSE, PLANTS, ANNUALS, BEDDING PLANTS,PROVEN WINNERS,JENSEN NURSERY AND GREENHOUSE, WINNIPEG coleous, hanging baskets, proven winners, greenhouse, winnipeg, jensen nursery, HANGING BASKETS, GREENHOUSE, GARDEN CENTERS, GATRDEN CENTRES, JENSNE NURSERYHANGING BASKETS, BEDDING PLANTS, GREENHOUSE, HANGING BASKETS, WINNIPEG, GREENHOUSE, GARDEN CENTER, GARDEN CENTRE, WINNIPEG, JENSEN NURSERY  WE HAVE PLANTED 1100 HANGING BASKETS FOR THE  2011 GARDENING SEASON! OUR GREENHOUSE IS LIKE A SUMMER DAY FILLED WITH PLANTS AND SUN! NOW WE HAVE A BREAK TILL THE SPECIALITY ANNUALS AND PERENNIALS ARRIVE NEXT! I CAN`T WAIT TO SEE THE BASKETS GROW AND START TO FLOWER! OUR GREENHOUSE WILL SOON BE FILLED AND READY FOR YOU TO SELECT YOUR FAVORITE BASKETS AND BEDDING PLANTS TO MAKE YOUR YARD A GARDEN PARADISE TO COME HOME TO! FEEL FREE TO DROP BY IF YOU NEED A TASTE OF SUMMER! BROWSE THE GREENHOUSE AND IMAGINE A SUNNY SUMMER DAY! I ALMOST FORGET IT`S WINTER WHEN I AM IN THE GREENHOUSE! SEE YOU ALL SOON! THE STAFF AT JENSEN`S!
Posted by Tammy Jensen at 12:00 AM 0 Comments